Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • I've been an actor, writer producer for over 30 years, and I've taught comedy for more than 20.

  • But it was only recently that I fully realized the incredible healing power of creativity.

  • Six years ago I almost died.

  • I had a massive stroke.

  • I lost the use of my right hand, my right arm.

  • My face was paralyzed and I spoke like this.

  • The doctor said it would be impossible for me to ever drive my car or play tennis or to ever think again.

  • Well, they were wrong.

  • They were so so.

  • So So you know why The healing power of creativity.

  • After the stroke, I was rushed to a place I like to call the room of death.

  • There were three other people in the room of death whose average age was approximately 275 and they breathe like this.

  • It was like I was surrounded by asthmatic pterodactyls.

  • The last thing the nurse said to me before I went to sleep was, I hope you have your affairs in order, not what you want to hear from your nurse.

  • At one in the morning, I was convinced that was going to die.

  • That night I had the most horrible nightmares filled with blood gore and samurais riding motorcycles, firing submachine guns.

  • I might have taken too much medication.

  • The next morning I was transferred from the room of Death to a different room, the room of Faint Hope.

  • There were three other stroke survivors in the room.

  • They were much younger than in the rule of death, and they sounded way less like terror doctors.

  • They were in as bad a worse shape than I was, which only made things worse for me.

  • I knew the stats.

  • One in six stroke victims die Doctor after doctor giving me test After test after test had driven me into a high state of anxiety and deep depression, I was worried I was goingto have another stroke.

  • I looked around me, but the other people in the room, moaning, lifeless, stared out the window.

  • The mountains you saw a bird fly by birds always remind me of my mom.

  • That's when the idea hit me.

  • I was going to turn this experience into a play.

  • A comedy, actually, and I'd call it a stroke of luck.

  • As soon as I had the idea, everything changed the entire narrative flipped.

  • It was like I had been given a new set of eyes.

  • The other people in the room were no longer victims.

  • Now there were powerful characters in my play.

  • These stroke survivors were my heroes, and I had been transformed into a hero in my own play.

  • Resilient, unstoppable.

  • I would survive this so I could be on inspiration to others.

  • I heard a voice in my head.

  • It was my mom's voice, something she used to always say to me when I was a child growing up, no matter how rough things get, do something you love every day.

  • So I did.

  • I started working on the play right away, just not with this hand.

  • About a week later, they sent me home.

  • I could barely move my fingers, and I could do this with my arm.

  • I was starting to believe that the doctors were right, but my recovery would be impossible.

  • I was visited by three therapists for one hour each every day.

  • The first exercise we did was tow walk for 1/2 a Knauer every day.

  • My physical therapist said that this would not only be good for my heart in my immune system, but it would dramatically improve my overall quality of life.

  • Wow, who knew?

  • I mean, other than my physical therapist, the first exercise we did was something called a pincer strength test.

  • So anybody know what that means.

  • It's Ah, this move measures the sanction, the pinch.

  • And it's one of the moves that separates from the from the other animals and humans.

  • And it also means that so really taste the meat, the ball in the top.

  • So I am squeezing like I'm really squeezing hard.

  • I'm giving it everything I've got.

  • Anybody want to guess my score?

  • Zero.

  • I score with zero.

  • You know what I thought?

  • Nowhere to go but up.

  • A couple of weeks later, we do another test using my right hand, taking small small items and putting them into a cup.

  • I had 2.5 minutes.

  • There were 15 items.

  • Things like coins, buttons, paperclips.

  • Ah, healthy hand would do all 15 in under 10 seconds.

  • I took the entire 2.5 minutes.

  • Any guesses as to how many?

  • I did two.

  • I did, too.

  • You know what I thought?

  • So it's we're better than zero.

  • Who was I kidding?

  • Was incredibly depressing for about 1/2 a second, but I was able to turn it around because I had become a hero in my own play.

  • I was able to see things differently.

  • And thanks to my mom, I was doing something.

  • I loved something creative every day.

  • Some days I'd work on the play.

  • Some days I'd sing.

  • Some days I dance, but I do something creative every single day.

  • And with my great of juices flowing, I started believing I would get better.

  • This is the power, the healing power of creativity.

  • It makes the impossible seem possible?

  • No, there have been many studies over the years that support this idea of creativity, being a powerful tool for people's healing and recovery.

  • Gonna cite one in particular.

  • In 2010 the American Journal of Health published a review called The Connection Between Art Healing and Public Health.

  • It found that creativity has a positive impact on one sense of hope, self worth and well being.

  • Decreases, depression and anxiety reduces stress, improves cell function brain function, boosts memory and releases the neurotransmitter dopamine, which is an anti depressant.

  • It actually creates feelings of joy and happiness.

  • It's like chocolate without the calories.

  • We had a mantra in recovery.

  • If it's good for the heart, it's good for the brain.

  • If it's good for the heart, it's good for the brain.

  • Come on, everybody, say it with me.

  • If it's good for the heart, it's good for the brain.

  • If it's good for the heart, it's good for the brain.

  • And creativity is not only good for the heart, good for the brain.

  • It is great for the soul.

  • Fast forward.

  • 15 months My place.

  • Stroke of luck has been an incredible success.

  • I've played across lower mainland, two standing ovations and five star reviews.

  • My recovery remarkable.

  • I'm driving my car.

  • I'm playing tennis, although I lose a lot and I've sung in front of thousands of people.

  • They're small, and when our rose here, I didn't have no doubt.

  • I'm actually not too bad.

  • I've become a spokesperson for the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

  • I have started hosting an event called Art After Stroke.

  • My play is being performed to stroke victims in recovery clubs across BC.

  • I've begun singing for hospital patients.

  • I have seen some amazing things I have seen how creativity in all its forms music, art, poetry, dance, painting, how it inspires people, how it helps them heal and gives them a better recovery.

  • I have witnessed with my own eyes people who cannot speak who are like zombies with zero energy suddenly light up.

  • As soon as the piano starts playing, it's like a switch is turned on, and when I start singing, they start singing with me, the whole song.

  • People who could not speak.

  • This is not some miracle.

  • This is not magic.

  • It's science.

  • Creativity makes the impossible seem possible.

  • I started sharing my story about my recovery, about my play.

  • I was talking to this friend of mine who designs video games.

  • We were chatting about how incredibly creative video games are.

  • There's the art.

  • There's a voice over the music, that technology, the intricate story lines.

  • I discover that we share a common vision, a common dream of using video games to promote positive social change.

  • Amazing.

  • The next day, the very next day, I'm fixing a washing machine.

  • Part of my day job is a building manager, and there's a guy waiting to do his laundry.

  • We start chatting, he tells me about something called Games for Change, which does exactly what we have been talking about the night before.

  • They have thousands of games that promote positive social change, everything from healing to climate change.

  • You name it.

  • He tells me about one game in particular, called File Oh, where gamers create models that can be used for genetic research.

  • Since its inception, more than 350,000 models have been created 7000 in the first day alone.

  • I can't believe the incredible potential once we unlock this.

  • That's possible because it's hard to get people to volunteer to make the world a better place.

  • But it is easy to get them to play video games.

  • I get so excited about sharing this idea of the healing power of creativity, this idea of inviting other people to be heroes in my play in my story and offering to be a hero in theirs.

  • Speaking of heroes, remember my mom?

  • Do something you love every day.

  • She's my biggest hero, probably one of the most creative people I ever met.

  • She was an amazing baker.

  • She loved to write stories and tell us stories to inspire us.

  • She was a brilliant dancer, and she came up with the most creative ways to get meeting me.

  • Eat food that I didn't want to.

  • I wrote another play.

  • It's about her.

  • It's called the unbreakable Popsicle Stick gang.

  • Anybody want to hear why it's called that 1965?

  • My father left us.

  • My mom calls an emergency family meeting.

  • That was her.

  • The two boys and the two girls.

  • She believed in equality.

  • She gave us each a Popsicle stick.

  • Let's see if you can break it.

  • And we did.

  • It was easy.

  • Then she gave us five Popsicle sticks, one for each of us, she said.

  • Try it.

  • We tried.

  • Couldn't we?

  • Couldn't do it.

  • You could be the Incredible Hulk.

  • You could not break five Popsicle sticks.

  • See, she said, when we're alone were easy to break.

  • But when we're together, nothing can break us apart.

  • She had used creativity to take this moment, which could have been devastating for our family and turn it into something that would keep us there for each other for the rest of our lives.

  • It makes the impossible seem possible.

  • I was thinking about my mom creativity.

  • This whole journey and about how important it was.

  • Tow Walk for 1/2 on hour every day.

  • How much that helped me.

  • I still try to do it today.

  • I was thinking, What if we took it a step further?

  • What if we did something creative?

  • Something we loved for half a Knauer every day or even 15 minutes?

  • If that's all you got, but do it every day.

  • What could happen?

  • Sign up for a cooking course.

  • Take dance lessons.

  • Learned to play the ukulele.

  • Start writing your play.

  • Imagine what could happen.

  • Imagine your mood improving your brain functioning better your stress going down, being kinder to the people around you.

  • Imagine that.

  • And when those people ask you what happened, what made this incredible change in you?

  • You tell them about the healing power of creativity.

  • You tell them about my mom.

  • What she said, Do something you love every day.

  • Thank you.

I've been an actor, writer producer for over 30 years, and I've taught comedy for more than 20.

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

A2 初級

The Healing Power of Creativity | Jacques Lalonde | TEDxBearCreekPark

  • 0 0
    林宜悉 發佈於 2020 年 04 月 07 日
影片單字