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  • (upbeat music)

  • - Hi, everybody.

  • Today, I'm going to make red bean porridge.

  • It's called Patjuk, but special Patjuk

  • we eat this winter solstice day,

  • which means in Korean, Dongjitnal.

  • The Dongji-patjuk.

  • We always celebrate the Dongjitnal

  • by making this porridge, special porridge.

  • You know the winter solstice

  • this is the longest night of the year,

  • which means the shortest day.

  • Right after that, days are getting longer and longer.

  • So we Koreans consider this

  • the small New Year's day

  • because basically it starts

  • daytime is getting longer.

  • That's why we celebrate with this Patjuk,

  • special Patjuk.

  • Red color fight off the evil spirit.

  • All go away, go away, evil spirit.

  • We are new life is coming,

  • new year is coming.

  • White rice cake balls,

  • it look like a small,

  • like a quail bird egg size.

  • Egg, it means a new start.

  • White, and so prosperity.

  • This porridge is very symbolic,

  • and also very tasty.

  • I'm going to make this with one cup of red beans.

  • Azuki beans, one cup.

  • This is so, so hard.

  • You can not cook this easily,

  • but our mission is to make these guys soft

  • and very tender until it can be very mashed easily,

  • like mashed potato, very easily.

  • If you have a pressure cooker,

  • just choose the function

  • to make a porridge function.

  • Around one and a half hour,

  • slowly, slowly,

  • just a really low-heat simmer.

  • If you don't have a pressure cooker,

  • just use a large pot.

  • So boil for a long time

  • until these red beans really get soft.

  • But first, we need to wash these red beans.

  • We washed it this way,

  • and then put this in a large pot.

  • And we need 10 cups of water.

  • 10 cups of cold water and boil,

  • first, over medium high heat for 30 minutes.

  • After that, really lower the heat to simmer,

  • and one and a half hour, just really low heat

  • and then cook.

  • Easily, you can mash this like that.

  • Like this.

  • They mash easily.

  • I'm going to show you my pressure cooker.

  • Pressure cooker, I use eight cups

  • instead of 10 cups.

  • Eight cups and one cup dried beans.

  • And they're mashable.

  • I'm going to strain these.

  • This is the strainer, coarse strainer.

  • You can use any type,

  • even this kind of strainer also,

  • but wire strainer is better.

  • And the large bowl.

  • And then just pour into this.

  • We are going to mash this

  • but this is really hot now.

  • I'm going to let it sit here.

  • We have to make rice cake balls,

  • bird's eggs, small size.

  • So we need a glutinous rice flour.

  • I'm going to use two cups,

  • half teaspoon salt,

  • one tablespoon sugar,

  • and then, this is a boiling,

  • hot boiling water, one cup.

  • Very, very hot.

  • And use a wooden spoon

  • and just mix.

  • You see, almost looks like cooked already.

  • We can't knead it because too hot.

  • So use wooden spoon

  • until temperature little cool down.

  • It doesn't take a long time.

  • That's easy, like almost one minute

  • until it makes one lump,

  • nice one lump.

  • And then I'm going to put this in the plastic bag.

  • And then around 20 minutes later,

  • I will then knead.

  • Okay.

  • So let's take care of this.

  • And mash this.

  • And then all beans,

  • except for the skins,

  • the beans go through this strainer,

  • and that's what we want.

  • In winter time,

  • in cold winter time,

  • my grandmother, she made a huge amount

  • in a really large cast iron pot

  • and filled it with Dongji-patjuk, this Patjuk.

  • My winter vacation starts at 23,

  • right after solstice day.

  • I went to my grandmother's house.

  • These days I was thinking that

  • how did she make all the rice cake balls,

  • these small rice cake balls are filled!

  • It must have taken so long time.

  • Even these days, I can think about this.

  • When I was young, I never thought about this.

  • I still remember that it really delicious,

  • the Dongji-patjuk.

  • The Patjuk you know, on top it's just a little frozen.

  • She had an old fashioned wood stove

  • and then real fire

  • like this wood is on fire

  • and then re-heat.

  • They are so tasty.

  • Now, I'm going to use my hands.

  • Look at that.

  • We are going to throw away.

  • Here, it is separated.

  • Clear soup is on top

  • and the beans are here.

  • One,

  • two,

  • seven,

  • eight.

  • And then I'm going to boil this.

  • We're gonna make rice cake ball.

  • And then around when my rice cake ball is done,

  • I'm going to heat it up.

  • When it's boiled,

  • rice cake balls, just dump it,

  • and that's it.

  • That's the Patjuk. Dongji-patjuk.

  • If this too sticky,

  • you can add some rice flour more.

  • And here, just a little,

  • dust the cutting board or any large plate.

  • Roll into balls.

  • Dongjitnal, so when I was very young,

  • and then my mom always made these,

  • and then she always asking me

  • to give it to the next door.

  • So she bring the large, like you know, kind of a bowl

  • and then, okay give it to, you know,

  • so somebody's mom's house.

  • And then, "yes" and I just go there

  • and gave it to them.

  • And I come home,

  • and then next the porridge,

  • I gotta go to another friend's house,

  • Several my mom's friends' houses,

  • next door neighbors,

  • I didn't know why Dongji-patjuk is always

  • we share at that time,

  • but later I found out why:

  • because we believe the red color,

  • red bean is going to fight off evil spirit,

  • so good luck for the next door person,

  • good luck for their friends.

  • I think this is a really good custom.

  • My last ball.

  • Right, rice cake ball, the smallest.

  • Leftover only.

  • So let's make porridge.

  • Bean is all sunk on the bottom.

  • Sometimes, occasionally you need to stir this