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  • Hey, guys.

  • Anyone who is here says Ethan, your real life English fluency coach.

  • And this is our first ever you to live.

  • So I apologize in advance there any technical errors or anything like that.

  • So if you are here watching, please take a moment to introduce yourself and where you're from.

  • You ended the chat box.

  • All right.

  • A lot of you here already.

  • Can you tell me where you guys are from?

  • In the junior from Brazil?

  • Hey, Order Gordy from Israel.

  • Sorry if I mispronounced her name.

  • Be hard from India.

  • Amount from Syria.

  • The job from, uh, India as well.

  • Im yes, come from Poland.

  • What's up?

  • See some people from the US, South Korea, Venezuela, Colombia, Rome, Pakistan, Turkey.

  • Well, awesome guys.

  • So many different countries.

  • It's really great.

  • All right, we'll get started in just a minute.

  • Yeah.

  • Moustapha from Morocco.

  • Christine from Taiwan.

  • What's up?

  • See someone from Sweden?

  • From Japan, South Korea, Atomic from the Netherlands, hard from Azerbaijan.

  • Wow.

  • I got you guys from every single corner of the world that seems like today.

  • That's really awesome.

  • All right, it's go time, Junior.

  • Let's do it.

  • All right.

  • So today we're talking all about.

  • Why are it is really difficult to understand.

  • Why is it that we're learning it for years?

  • And yet we go toe watch our favorite TV series.

  • We go maybe to another country to travel and stuff, and we contract with natives and you're just, like, get completely lost People are so difficult to understand.

  • Uh huh.

  • So let me just transition into the presentation I have for you guys today.

  • One second, and you should be seeing that any second now.

  • So, as I said, Wired, it was really difficult to understand.

  • And why can't you understand?

  • Native, sometimes if you guys are just logging and now be sure when you come into the chat to say your name and where you're from.

  • But as a lot of you have already introduced yourself, we will just jump right into this, or it's so to start out before we get into the fluency coaching lesson.

  • I wanted to introduce myself for those of you that don't know me, I'm Ethan, your realized English fluency coach and obviously one of the teachers here at learning With with TV.

  • I'm co founder of real life English with Justin So for those of you that don't know, realising Bush were actually the creators of the learned most with TV channel.

  • So for any confusion, there realized English is our company that we help you guys use your English in the real world.

  • And one of the ways we do this is through our garnish with TV channel Here on you two, I have over seven years of experience teaching English in many different countries around the world.

  • Justin actually has, I think, many more than me, and I have over 11 years of experience learning languages myself.

  • I started learning German when I was in high school, and I I was fortunate enough to go later in Germany for six months at that time.

  • And then, you know, I have made different experiences right now.

  • I live in Barcelona, so I speak Spanish and cattle.

  • Um, I looked in Brazil and I speak Portuguese, and I've gotten to live in different places and also just learned a bunch of different languages on my own.

  • So, uh, you know, I think that I could give you a lot of tips from my own experience and a really passionate about traveling experiencing different cultures and bringing this to all of you all around the world, helping you to discover the world through English and get to know a world beyond borders.

  • So what are we going to do today?

  • Today you will get the tools and the resource is strategies to help you to use fun.

  • Native resource is like TV YouTube and podcasts to learn English without subtitles without getting lost.

  • So you'll understand riel native speakers.

  • And if you stay until the very end, then we have some really terrific innovative methodologies so that you could get started right when you finish this video.

  • All right, So to start out, I want to ask you guys a question.

  • So why do you think natives are really difficult to understand?

  • I want to know what you think.

  • So wait just a second.

  • Because this video, actually, it takes a second to show to you guys after I speak.

  • So please comment in the chat box there.

  • Why do you think natives are difficult to understand?

  • So nickel says, because they speak so fast, he says the same.

  • Ah, lot of you're saying because we speak so quickly because the accent That's Ah Stephanie.

  • Good points, depending on which English you study and spend the most time with.

  • That can definitely affect your understanding.

  • We mix words together in a sentence.

  • The sound of English Will you slaving mediums?

  • Definitely a lot of reductions.

  • Pronunciation being very different from your own.

  • We reduce words.

  • We drop a lot of words attractions, idioms because you don't have opportunities for this in the native speakers.

  • All right, slang, idioms, native words, drinking and linking.

  • All right, great guys.

  • Eso What do people usually say?

  • So we're going to disprove all of these common misconceptions.

  • Some of you really got some things that are definitely very true, though, so that's really awesome.

  • But I hope to be teaching you even more today about this stuff.

  • So one of the first things that were here, as a lot of you said, I need to speak to fast and although you know, if you're not used to the speed of which we speak, this can cause confusion.

  • That's not the principal problem can be one problem, but usually it's not really the problem that we speak too fast.

  • You may be miss all the jokes, everybody else's laughing and you're not sure why.

  • So this again, it's not just because we're speaking fast.

  • There are some other factors at stake here.

  • There are some other important factors to take into consideration.

  • You can't understand without subtitles.

  • This is very common that people here, but with some of the resource, is some of the techniques that were going to be talking about.

  • Today.

  • You can learn to understand native speakers without subtitles.

  • A.

  • Someone said I saw that you don't have anyone to speak to you so you can improve your listening.

  • But as we will see today, this is also not necessarily true.

  • You do not need a needed speaking friend to improve your listen.

  • You don't have support from your friends and your family.

  • This could make it very difficult to actually maybe watch a fair TV show in English because your spouse or, you know your other family members want to watch it with subtitles in your own language.

  • Or maybe you are taking an English class and your teachers in the native to the other people you're learning with our natives and so you don't get exposure to this and all seriously, the very common Excuse that I just don't have time to learn.

  • I don't have time to improve my speaking or my listening.

  • Sorry.

  • And this is also something that even the business of people can make their learning convenient and find the time to do it.

  • So we hear this lot need to speak too fast, right?

  • As we said, as many of you said in the comments.

  • But it's not the real problem.

  • So what is the real problem that well, you need to learn these 33 different factors that make up native English comprehension need these to master all of these in order to become successful in You're listening.

  • The 1st 1 is connected speech.

  • We're going to go much more into depth about what this is.

  • And then if you guys enjoy this YouTube live in the future, we definitely want to go into some more details about connected speech.

  • We're just going to give an overview today because it is a very complex topic, but extremely extremely important.

  • The next important thing is native vocabulary, as a lot of you said idioms and slime that we use in the last one, which I'm not sure if I saw too many comments about this but the cultural context, so we'll talk about that.

  • So the first thing, what is connected?

  • Speech.

  • So could you guys please take a second?

  • Real quick to comment What is kind to speech?

  • Have you heard of this before?

  • And as I said, it may take just a minute for you guys to answer that question after I've asked it and is Alexandra definitely wanna give a shout out to you?

  • Thank you so much.

  • I'm glad that you are enjoying it as a teacher.

  • Oh, also, I forgot to mention you guys, Justin is there in the chat.

  • So if you guys have questions, you can feel free to ask them in there, and he's taking a note of the best ones and we'll have a little question and answer at the end, and so I'll answer some of your questions.

  • So when people connect words, that's it.

  • Gets connected.

  • Speech.

  • When people connect words conjunctions so knows that quite conjunction.

  • But it's related to that for sure.

  • It's not in DVD ums.

  • We will talk about mediums when we talk about vocabulary, but that is different.

  • Easier when you pronounce different continents.

  • Not quite so.

  • It's not about speaking.

  • It's I mean, you can speak with connected speech, but first it's really important for learners to be able to recognize this and understand it.

  • Maybe how needed speak based on linking sentences?

  • Good one heavy ETA compressing words.

  • A group of words blending words together, linked words speaking using connectors connect the last letter a word to the first letter of the falling word.

  • Where to divide words.

  • All right, these are all really great guys.

  • Thanks so much.

  • So let me give you the official answer What we would say.

  • So this is as some of you said, how we cut and link our words together.

  • So sometimes we reduce words and we put them together with other words in the sentence.

  • And this could give the impression they were speaking much faster than we actually are when maybe we're not actually speaking that fast.

  • And another really important thing is they don't teach you this in school unless you're lucky and you go to a very special I school or you have a really dynamic English teacher.

  • You will probably not learn this in school and because of that.

  • You're not expecting it when you hear native speakers when you're watching TV, listen to the podcast.

  • When you're speaking with a native friend and so you're not used to it.

  • We're going to help you with that.

  • Another really important thing is that it is predictable connected speeches, not just random.

  • And as I said in some future YouTube lives, we want to jump into not so much rules because I wouldn't say that there's rules for gonna speech.

  • But there are guidelines.

  • You can learn how English speakers native English speakers typically do this.

  • You could even learn if you so desire to do this yourself when you speak.

  • So just to give you some context for this, for why connected speech could give the illusion that were speaking really fast when that's not necessarily the problem.

  • We have these four sentences here that are very similar in their meeting, and some of them are longer than other ones.