Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • - Hello, lovely people.

  • In this video, I'll be coming to you

  • mainly from my bathroom.

  • Hello, and welcome to my bathroom.

  • Please don't judge it.

  • It is one of the rooms we will eventually get renovated.

  • So I'm a vintage lover.

  • I sleep in sponge rollers, I don't own a pair of jeans,

  • and my lipstick is always, always red,

  • to the extent that I now find my face without red lipstick

  • rather alarming.

  • (Gasps) What happened to my lips?

  • Where did they go?

  • Ah, my lips are back.

  • But when it comes to lady-like pampering,

  • I'm sorely lacking.

  • I'm lucky enough to have had eczema on my face as a child.

  • Wait for the luck bit.

  • Which means that I pretty much missed

  • all of the years of teenage spots.

  • Whilst my friends were complaining

  • about the annoying spot at the end of their nose,

  • I was busy trying to avoid perfumes, wool,

  • and the angry red rash that shows up on my neck

  • when I'm close to grass.

  • Yes, I'm allergic to grass, the type that grows

  • in your average British garden.

  • I get red welts on my legs if it hits my naked skin.

  • Do I still take aesthetically pleasing shots

  • in long grass?

  • Yes, yes, I do.

  • I was even born with angry red eczema

  • across my face and eyelids.

  • I was not, as my parents liked to say, a looker,

  • but one of the most common compliments I now receive

  • is that I have lovely skin.

  • Why, thank you.

  • Often followed by, "what's your skincare routine?"

  • And I'm like.

  • (crickets chirping)

  • I'm meant to have a skincare routine?

  • Yes, I have somehow reached the age of 31

  • without investing in a complicated 10 step process

  • of different tubes and oils,

  • and I'll be honest, I'm not exactly sure what toner is.

  • I mean, I wash my face with water,

  • I put suntan lotion on, I remove my makeup

  • with makeup wipes before I go to sleep,

  • and I probably wear makeup every third day, maybe.

  • Is that a skincare routine?

  • You tell me.

  • But according to the internet, I should have a process

  • which I follow morning and night, every day.

  • It feels like a lot of work.

  • So I thought I'd start where I feel most comfortable,

  • living the life of my grandmother, but gay.

  • My grandmother, like most women in the 1950s,

  • followed a very simple two step routine

  • morning and evening.

  • Number one, violently wash your entire head with Pears soap.

  • Number two, smother yourself in cold cream,

  • and then, scrape it off.

  • But like, make it sound flowery and less violent.

  • To kickstart my new beginning into actually taking care

  • of my skin, sorry for largely ignoring you before,

  • I'm going to follow a 1950s skincare routine

  • for a whole week.

  • Step one is not just cleaning your skin, oh, no.

  • According to 1950s guides, this is the time

  • to give your skin a good, invigorating workout.

  • The advice is to have a daily bath or shower,

  • and then go to town, scrubbing your face

  • with a washcloth to carry away all soapy residue.

  • The aim is to stimulate the skin, and wake it up all over.

  • I should probably tell you, at this point,

  • I don't actually have a daily bath,

  • because that's really bad for my eczema,

  • so steamy sink will have to do.

  • We're going to stimulate my skin and wake it up.

  • Also, cover it in soap, but then, get rid of the soap.

  • Friction is apparently the most important thing here,

  • as is covering my neck and my ears,

  • and to be honest, I don't especially make a point

  • to clean behind ears, and now I realize I should.

  • I'm using Pears transparent soap,

  • which was available in the 1950s,

  • and still is available today.

  • I will leave a link in the description down below

  • because I actually care about my skin.

  • Most soaps in the 1950s had carbolic acid in, which,

  • I don't know whether I have a massive

  • yearning to put on my face.

  • Just stood for five minutes waiting for the tap to warm and,

  • it's not even that warm, so!

  • We really need a new boiler.

  • (smooth music)

  • Let's actually add some soap in here.

  • To my incredibly lukewarm water.

  • (smooth music)

  • I smell a bit like a grandmother, but, I love it.

  • Vigorous, vigorous.

  • (smooth music)

  • What a nice way just to start your day, I think.

  • Scraping your entire face off.

  • All right.

  • Once you have successfully rubbed all of the soap off,

  • it's time to watch your face with cold water

  • which clearly won't be a problem.

  • Okay, ooh.

  • That's cold.

  • Step two, cold cream, which is an emulsion of water and fat

  • designed to smooth your skin.

  • Apparently it also removes makeup

  • which we fill find out this evening.

  • So the breadth of my moisturizer knowledge

  • is that cold cream is a water in oil

  • which makes it stay on your skin,

  • whilst other moisturizers are an oil in water

  • which mean that they are absorbed into your skin.

  • I'm gonna leave the link to this in the description as well

  • and can I just say,

  • I'm really impressed by the color aesthetic.

  • I'm so pleased about this.

  • It suggests in the vintage instructions to pin your hair

  • out of the way, but I will be using my,

  • my lovely wife's hair wrap.

  • Claudia actually has a skincare routine because

  • she hit 30 and decided she had to research skincare.

  • And I was like, yeah, I'll continue using

  • water and makeup wipes, thanks.

  • But now look, see, I'm learning and growing.

  • Smother your face in cream, give a little massage

  • and delicately remove using tissue.

  • Apparently during this massage, you're supposed to pay

  • special attention to the bits of your face

  • where dirt collects.

  • So that's like the, what do you call this bit?

  • Bits where skin folds.

  • And I don't know.

  • But not your eyes, don't stick it in your eyes.

  • Let's get smothering.

  • (smooth music)

  • Okay.

  • All right, I think we've successfully

  • really rubbed this all over my face now.

  • Not really gone anywhere, so, start removing.

  • Use tissue and a fresh little section of tissue

  • to wipe away each bit.

  • I feel like I'm really just rubbing this into my hair.

  • Probably should've thought that true.

  • This is a harder job than first assumed.

  • The cream doesn't really appear to be going anywhere.

  • I mean it smells very pleasant but it's really up there.

  • How are you supposed to do this,

  • avoiding your hair and your eyes?

  • Clearly my skincare skills are not on point.

  • Okay.

  • Ooh, well, ha.

  • My hair's pretty oily now.

  • Feels very smooth but then also my hands

  • feel incredibly oily, so.

  • It's gonna work as the moisturizer

  • that I'm then gonna put makeup on.

  • I'm gonna go out to brunch with my gals.

  • And then we're spending the day doing,

  • today, catching up on work stuff.

  • Anyway.

  • Yes.

  • Gonna film some videos and then when I come back

  • this evening, you'll see me as I try and take my makeup off

  • using cold cream, which apparently is possible.

  • We'll see.

  • Hello, how do you do?