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  • UM two episode 230 of Sea XO talk.

  • I'm Michael Craig Zeman, industry analyst and your host for this show.

  • Today we are going to be speaking about video video in marketing and video in business, and we have two people who are two amazing people I'm going to introduce first.

  • David Hoffman, who is a not sure what the title would be, is a strategic communications consultant, and he's a guy who happens to have made about 175 documentaries for television.

  • It's a guy that knows a lot about video.

  • So, David, I tell us, tell us briefly, what do you do?

  • I've been doing the same thing my whole Korea, which is communication.

  • But what's communication?

  • My view is it's not what you say that the audience hears the audience.

  • Here's what you say and what they already think.

  • So my whole world is about engaging audiences.

  • Engagement means I got to know the audiences on.

  • I gotta know how they're going to react to any message in any media these days are merrily video.

  • Our second guest is Mark for Delmon, who runs a marketing agency.

  • Is it?

  • I'm not sure if that's the right term marketing agency or digital?

  • Yeah, digital marketing.

  • Gaea.

  • And so So.

  • Mark.

  • Hi.

  • Tell us about yourself.

  • I am Mark Edelman.

  • I do run fanatics.

  • Media to focus is for us.

  • And very happy to be here.

  • Michael and David.

  • Because I love talking about the subjects.

  • The 1st 1 being influencer marketing and the 2nd 1 being video marketing.

  • Why?

  • Why video?

  • Why should Why should business people care about video?

  • Why the marketing people care about video talks to anybody?

  • Sure.

  • Um, video is about emotion.

  • What do you do when you read the Wall Street Journal?

  • You skim it.

  • What do you do when you read a website page?

  • You skim it.

  • We all skim.

  • Nobody reads anymore.

  • Maybe we didn't.

  • I didn't read the book.

  • So video is about emotion.

  • Interesting statistic.

  • The eyeballs last longer.

  • Any other form of media that's on the web doesn't hold you like video.

  • So if the video has a good story and speaks to a target audience or an influence, or as Mark said, I'm interested in what he thinks about that, um then I say video is the most powerful way to affect an audience to make a change.

  • The key thing is this.

  • When the person watches a video of a a searcher, it's coming from YouTube.

  • So this guy found searchers that search wine, spot him and say, Whoa, I want to see that guy Or is it your friends?

  • Like on Facebook?

  • Two very different states of mind.

  • In one case, I'm searching for Dog Walker and not really the person whose video I'm watching in Facebook.

  • They already know me.

  • I want a dog walker.

  • They could hit me with a dog walker video, which is why Facebook sponsored posts are just off the charge.

  • Successful, he will say.

  • Been Yoshimi 30 seconds.

  • Video should be in one minute, no more than 90 seconds.

  • Let me tell you, I made a video on cancer for a guy who wrote a book on cancer nine minutes each.

  • Clint everybody watches.

  • It has, like a 90% viewership.

  • It's not about time, it's about the audience.

  • The audience cares, and this kid's telling me about a wine that I didn't know about.

  • And here in Northern California, people really care about wine.

  • Um, I'm gonna watch the whole thing.

  • I'm probably got a quick on his other videos.

  • It's enormously powerful when you spy speaking to the audience and trying to affect something, and you're a good character and you got a good story.

  • I don't know if Mark agrees with that.

  • Yeah, I mean, absolutely.

  • I kind of look at it a little bit slightly differently because not all those are Gary V.

  • I look at a longer the video, the higher the production quality or the higher the individual hair charisma has to be.

  • I gonna have to disagree with Mark about that.

  • It's ample.

  • I get going to use goes way back to my youth.

  • I don't know how many of you are watching this.

  • No.

  • Carville, it was Tahrir l a New York City ice cream.

  • And Tom Carvel produced these commercials, and the commercial said, Hi, I'm Tom Cargill.

  • I'm here in Rid Riverhead High Joe.

  • How you doing, Joe?

  • You make ice cream?

  • Is it fresh?

  • It was the most primitive.

  • An enormously powerful the same with Prady eight.

  • Crazy Eddie in New York.

  • I learned from that and I have found experimenting that my most popular videos for clients and for me Sorry for the phone are they're all after me.

  • Only the most popular videos are not the ones that look the best.

  • In fact, production value, isn't it?

  • Production value makes me think it's made by a company and its public relations rather than what I call user generated style.

  • And I, like user generated stop Michael's talking to me right now and I'm talking to you right in this little bucks just being me and Mark's being him.

  • That's the most powerful communication, in my view, this issue of charisma, how do we create videos that cut through the noise?

  • Here's what I think about don't think about noise.

  • Think about audience.

  • Mark probably agrees with me about that.

  • When I get down to, I have a video called, uh, it's about the United States equestrian team made by the team, So I've made it.

  • And in that one of my key words in YouTube was falling off horses.

  • 90% of the people who clicked that clicked my video in Google Edwards and watched the whole thing waiting from falling on fourth.

  • So it's about who is your audience is no noise.

  • If I have a certain cancer and 50,000 people have that cancer and you've got a drug that's gonna help me.

  • You may not have the drug I use, but I'm going to go to you.

  • Don't think about noise.

  • Noise is if I'm selling Pepsi.

  • If you're not selling Pepsi, but you're selling a brand, let's say BMW, it has a target on.

  • They have targets within the target.

  • Is it a woman?

  • Very different.

  • It's still making their ads on television for men.

  • I can't believe that.

  • Is it a millennial or a baby boomer like me?

  • There's not a single formula for success in breaking through the noise.

  • There is a lot of noise, but I agree with David.

  • You gotta find your your audience.

  • And if you stream it around a lot pretty soon, you'll be be able to develop that audience and speak that audience.

  • But I still think you gotta work on charisma.

  • I think Christmas just a function of Okay, be who you are.

  • There's there's a guy it does finance, and I'll look it up in between.

  • Ah, questions here that he's kind of dry speaks right at the camera, talks about finance, but this is this guy's phenomenally gets 3 to 400,000 views, and he's talking about financial subjects like stocks and bonds and all these obscure subject that you and I know nothing about.

  • But he makes it plainly visible at any demonstrates value by just talking in plain English what these things are.

  • Let me say something about what Marches said really powerful yourself.

  • Make mistakes.

  • When Reagan made a mistake in his press conference by saying, Look, I don't know the answer to that, he said to this member of the press, his ratings went higher than they had ever been.

  • I think 76% of the country's supported it be riel.

  • The issue on the Web with video is authenticity.

  • If that authenticity comes from a very well produced, beautiful musical comedy, okay, if it's come from you talking at the end of the day, you're tired.

  • A little bit of circles on the rise, but you're real.

  • You'll work with the audience.

  • Mark also has a part of his business.

  • I really am fascinated by which is the influences, because what influences do, and a lot of statistics on this if they something's gonna watch 30 seconds, but it's coming from an influencer.

  • We're gonna watch four minutes.

  • Yeah, it's er has enormous power, and I put them in front of the camera first of all, and make sure they're looking to me a camera.

  • This is video on the Web.

  • Don't look off like it's a press.

  • It's not the press present over here that could see that I'm here.

  • I'm talking to you right now.

  • Right into the little green dot On my Mac.

  • That's real important.

  • Second, I started off by saying, from behind the camera to the guy.

  • So, uh, are you nervous?

  • Yeah.

  • Yeah, a little bit nervous.

  • Me nervous.

  • It's something to be nervous.

  • You're nervous.

  • You're on media.

  • That's good.

  • It's good to be nervous.

  • Other thing I say which will help you all.

  • I think we have to go in front of the camera.

  • Think future video isn't about the moment.

  • It's about the future.

  • Somebody's seeing this in the future.

  • Therefore, what do you need to say where a month later?

  • A year later?

  • Obviously, it's going to have meaning for that person you're trying to reach you, Elsa.

  • Well said that Michael, I want to state David live video What do you think?

  • The differences between recorded video and live video?

  • My vote is some people are good live other people are not the introverts of our world.

  • Our tend not to be Mark and I are more extroverted and Michael is.

  • Michael has learned how to give his personality and rhythm and ed credibility without really attacking.

  • You are being as aggressive as Mark and I are.

  • So my vote is if you're not good on Facebook live or YouTube life, don't do it that for you.

  • So would you would you even ask they would you?

  • Would you instruct them to kind of