B1 中級 27 分類 收藏
開始影片後,點擊或框選字幕可以立即查詢單字
字庫載入中…
回報字幕錯誤
- In other videos, we had started talking
about the types of bonds that might form
between atoms of a given element.
For example, if you have two metals forming a bond,
well, you are going to have a metallic bond.
If you have two nonmetals,
engaged in some type of bonding activity,
this is likely to be a covalent bond.
And the general rule of thumb is
if you have one metal,
and one nonmetal,
that this is likely to be an ionic bond.
These are the general rules of thumb.
What I wanna do in this video is to better appreciate
that bonding is really more of a spectrum.
There are bonds,
and we've talked about things like polar covalent bonds,
that start to look a little bit more and more
ionic in nature.
And so that's what we're gonna talk about in this video
and think about it in the context of electronegativity.
Just as a reminder, we talk about electronegativity
in many videos,
but this is the property of an atom that's in a bond
to hog electrons,
to want the electron density to be closer to it
for the electron pairs to spend more time
around that particular atom.
So, something with a high electronegativity
is going to be greedier with the electrons
than something with a low electronegativity.
We can think about the spectrum between
at this end you have ionic,
and at this end you have covalent.
And one way to think about it is at the extreme left end,
you don't have much difference in electronegativities.
Both atoms that are participating in the bond
are roughly equal in how badly they want the electrons.
While in an ionic bond,
you have a very big difference in electronegativities,
so much so that one of the atoms swipes an electron
from the other.
So, one way to think about it is,
let me draw a little bit of an arrow here,
so this is increased electronegativity
difference as you go from left to right.
And some place in the middle,
or as you go from left to right,
you're becoming more and more polar covalent.
So for example, if you have a bond
between oxygen and hydrogen,
these are both nonmetals.
So this will be a covalent bond
by just our general rule of thumb.
And actually the division between metals and nonmetals,
I'm gonna make it right over here,
it's this blue line is one division you could view,
although things that straddle it
are a little bit more interesting.
But oxygen and hydrogen are both nonmetals,
but you have a pretty big difference in electronegativities.
This right over here is electronegativity
measured on a Pauling scale,
named after the famous biologist and chemist, Linus Pauling,
and you can see on that scale oxygen is a 3.44,
one of the most electronegative atoms.
Electronegativity trends, we talk about in other videos,
goes from bottom left to top right.
The things at the top right that are not the noble gases,
these are the ones that really are greedy with electrons.
And oxygen is one of the greediest.
While hydrogen, it's not not electronegative,
but it's lower, at 2.20.
So in this scenario,
those electrons are going to spend more time
around the oxygen.
If they spent an equal amount of time,
that oxygen might be neutral,
but since they're spending a little bit more time here,
we'll say that has a partial negative charge,
the Greek lowercase letter delta,
and on the hydrogen side
because the shared electrons are spending more time
around the oxygen than around the hydrogen,
you would have a partially positive charge right over there.
And so this would be a polar covalent bond.
Maybe on the spectrum it sits right over there,
depending on how you wanna,
how you view this scale.
Now the other question you say is
okay, this is a spectrum between covalent and ionic,
what about metallic?
Well, metallic bonds are in general going to be formed
if you have two things that are not so different
in electronegativity,
and they both have reasonably low electronegativities.
So that's why things on the bottom left right over here,
if you have two of these forming bonds
with each other somehow,
that you're likely to have metallic bonds.
And that makes sense because in metallic bonds
you have all the electrons kind of mixing in
in a shared pool,
which gives some of the properties like conductivity.
And so if you have a lot of things
that are fairly similar in electronegativity,
and they're all low in electronegativity,
they might be more willing to share those valence electrons
in a communal pool.
提示:點選文章或是影片下面的字幕單字,可以直接快速翻譯喔!

載入中…

Predicting bond type (electronegativity) | AP Chemistry | Khan Academy

27 分類 收藏
林宜悉 發佈於 2020 年 3 月 28 日
看更多推薦影片
  1. 1. 單字查詢

    在字幕上選取單字即可即時查詢單字喔!

  2. 2. 單句重複播放

    可重複聽取一句單句,加強聽力!

  3. 3. 使用快速鍵

    使用影片快速鍵,讓學習更有效率!

  4. 4. 關閉語言字幕

    進階版練習可關閉字幕純聽英文哦!

  5. 5. 內嵌播放器

    可以將英文字幕學習播放器內嵌到部落格等地方喔

  6. 6. 展開播放器

    可隱藏右方全文及字典欄位,觀看影片更舒適!

  1. 英文聽力測驗

    挑戰字幕英文聽力測驗!

  1. 點擊展開筆記本讓你看的更舒服

  1. UrbanDictionary 俚語字典整合查詢。一般字典查詢不到你滿意的解譯,不妨使用「俚語字典」,或許會讓你有滿意的答案喔