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  • Hello world! Where I'm from in Japan, this is what a hotel is like. Nah, I'm kidding. I'm actually in Las Vegas

  • Except I'm not, I'm still in Japan and I know what you're thinking - Greg, you really splurged to this time

  • But no I actually didn't. This is one of the cheapest options I've had at this time of night and it is...

  • 11:15 p.m. At night. Thank you very much Fitbit

  • And I'm tired. Too tired to tell the story right now of why I am in a...

  • Love hotel all by my lonesome

  • but

  • after I have had my breakfast which will be

  • I'm going for the pancake set, because I don't feel like the Salmon no Tataki in the morning. So,

  • After I have my pancake set, I will explain. Good night!

  • Hello world, where in the world do you stay when visiting Japan?

  • There are so many options - regular hotel, business hotel, capsule hotel, Minpaku (Airbnb)

  • Minshuku, Ryokan, and yes, the love hotel. Well, I've been to all these places

  • So let me break them down for you, and give you the pros and cons

  • The do's and don'ts and yeah also teach you how to escape a love hotel

  • But first let's start with Japan's good old regular vanilla hotels

  • This is the easiest type of accommodation to explain it's fairly close to what you'd expect from a western hotel bed, mini-fridge

  • wifi, kettle, bathroom

  • But no shower

  • I felt like I should be doing something but

  • I'm tired

  • Okay, this particular hotel is a bit different. It's a special hotel that has a public bath attached

  • So the bathing facilities are actually shared. In most western style hotels in Japan

  • You'd usually get a shower in the bathroom

  • If you find yourself in a place like this

  • You'd grab this face towel and regular towel, go to the locker room, get naked and take the face towel with you

  • After that, clean yourself with soap and the face towel at one of the stations, then enjoy the bath or maybe relax in the sauna

  • Just don't put your towel or hair in the water. I'll link to a more detailed guide in the description

  • Often hotels have breakfast included depending on the price you've paid for accommodation

  • They can range from edible to delicious, but they generally skewed Japanese style. So be aware that it's probably not pancakes, eggs and bacon

  • Oh and a big thing anywhere in Japan if you see a raised floor like this

  • Especially one where there are slippers take off your shoes. Almost every single family or friend

  • I've had visit me in Japan has stepped with shoes in places where they shouldn't have. This is probably the biggest no-no

  • Did I just say no-no? I mean biggest screwup. How about that.

  • That a foreigner does that actually causes Japanese people trauma. Raised floor almost always means take off your shoes

  • Final thing to point out about Western style hotels in Japan is that there's also the business hotel

  • It's essentially the same thing as a regular hotel room, but just smaller. Think tiny dorm room and you'll have the right idea

  • Okay, let's do the pros and cons of western-style hotels in Japan. Pros. They are familiar

  • They usually include breakfast. The location is generally convenient and is in walking distance to a train station

  • Cons. Depending on the hotel,

  • they can be expensive. But business hotels are relatively affordable. Rooms will be smaller than places

  • you would find in Canada or the United States, especially in big cities

  • You often pay per person not per room and they're fairly strict about the number of people allowed in a room

  • Beautiful B-roll time. This was my morning view of the Seto Inland Sea and the reason why I booked my hotel here

  • Now on to capsule hotels

  • Yes, the famous Japanese capsule hotels where you sleep the night away in a pod.On this floor, there are actually 108 of them

  • They're fairly basic - a radio, TV, light, mirror, and of course, a bed.

  • There are screens you can pull down for privacy, but that's about it

  • Except it isn't. There are a bunch of common areas included

  • You have a hangout room and behind it, relaxation chairs, an eating area with a kitchen

  • So this capsule hotel will come with breakfast. You can even get bear and ice cream.

  • A massage corner yay

  • There's also a work corner. Boo

  • But like the last place there's something special about here as well. You see these lockers

  • Well, this is where you get naked, because yes, this is a spa and capsule hotel combined

  • I was allowed to film everywhere but the public bath and sauna part

  • But this is what it looks like from the picture. I think it actually looks nicer in person

  • Anyways, it was at this point that I saw everyone getting naked that I realized that it was a male-only capsule hotel

  • Although there is female staff. Just so you know

  • But generally at a regular capsule hotel

  • You would put your stuff in a storage locker and then use the communal bathing, toilets, and sinks

  • So it's kind of like dorm living except people take being quiet in the capsule area, which has its own floor quite seriously

  • So really no talking in there

  • Alright pros and cons time. Pros. It's cheap and even a bit cheaper if you booked online

  • It's accessible at all hours

  • which is actually quite important as this is not the case for all accommodation types in Japan,

  • although checking times can vary depending on the location.

  • And it actually has a decent bed as counterintuitive as that might sound. It was cozy

  • Cons, there's limited storage space. Although you can usually get a storage locker for oversized items

  • People are very quiet in the capsule area, but there's the potential to hear others come and gang going

  • So if you're an ultra light sleeper, you might want to use earbuds headphones or use a different type of accommodation

  • It's not like sleeping in a coffin

  • I actually enjoy the pods but it's not for cluster phobic people either. You can't be loud and you don't really have private space

  • Let's roll our second set of b-roll footage right in the middle of a rice field

  • Relax, enjoy

  • Next up is Airbnb, or Minpaku. A Minpaku is basically someone's home that is not run as a hotel business

  • So no check-in desk, no fire safety equipment and so on. A Minshuku, on the other hand, is run as a hotel business

  • But they can still look very much like a traditional Japanese home. I'll explain more in the Minshuku section

  • This is an Airbnb

  • We stayed at and it's an old Japanese home that was converted into a daycare center and then into an Airbnb place

  • This is why you get this cute little toilet

  • The real adult sized toilet is behind. This one came with an old-school tub in the bathing room

  • But the kitchen looked like what you'd find in a basic apartment.

  • I really like these exterior hallways. All along it, it has these lovely sliding doors, although they are quite loud

  • The sleeping rooms were nice

  • You get the Tatami mats and you sleep right on the ground with a supplied futons. If you want authentic Japanese living

  • Well, you're getting it when you go with a Minpaku

  • Now to the pros and cons. Pros

  • For the space and quality you get, they are cheaper than other accommodation types. You get to experience authentic Japanese living both traditional and modern

  • Depending on the place, although it'll be a lot less cluttered than the average Japanese house. Trust me many places have laundry facilities. Yay

  • Depending on the host, you may be able to interact a bit and even grab a meal together

  • You have all the amenities of a house from a kitchen, to a dining table, to a washing machine

  • You probably don't have to meet other hotel guests and the location can be anywhere

  • Cons.

  • Sometimes you need to meet up with the host at a specific time which can be difficult to do with the unpredictability of traveling

  • At someone's house, so there's more pressure not to break or mess anything up

  • You're expected to leave things as you found them

  • Like if you use dishes you should wash them. If you have garbage you put it out on garbage day

  • With Airbnb there be clean and other fees so look closely at the final price

  • Every place has their own rules, so it can be a hassle to learn new rules everywhere you go

  • While it's nice that the location can be anywhere

  • You can also really be in the middle of nowhere, which is not convenient if you're traveling by public transportation

  • there's usually no breakfast, but many will have some basics like tea or coffee or some instant Miso or noodles

  • And one last con of these country homes are the spiders. We had lots of fun avoiding this one

  • Let's go

  • subtropical with the b-roll footage and I know you'll ask so I'll save myself a comment and tell you that this is Kouzushima,

  • a little island south of Tokyo

  • Whoever came up with this idea for a swimming hole has my respect. I just love the wooden structures

  • Now we find ourselves at a Minshuku, or guest house. Like a Minpaku,

  • A Minshuku can look or even be like a person's house, but they are commercial accommodations and more inn like

  • So think check-in desk

  • Dining area for everyone to eat breakfast, lots of toilets, some more toilets and a big bathing area

  • These are generally owner run. So like a bed-and-breakfast type of place. This one happens to be on an island

  • So they had a great area to hose down and clean up. Plus parasols and water toys you've used at the beach

  • Breakfast is usually served and it's not uncommon to get dinner as well. Let's hit up those pros and cons

  • Pros

  • They're not usually owned by big corporations. So expect a more local experience and maybe even a quirky owner

  • You'll get a fairly authentic stay in Japanese lodging

  • You might get some personalized services like being picked up from the ferry terminal or train station

  • It's more affordable than Ryokan which will cover soon. So sit tight

  • Cons. Many are cash only so be prepared

  • Check-in and checkout times can be fairly restrictive. So make sure to check those checks. There are set times to eat

  • So again check check check

  • As for location, they're probably not the most convenient

  • In conclusion, there is step above hostels, but not as fancy as the Ryokans.

  • But before we get to either let's have some more b-roll footage

  • This is of Edogawa River where our next hostel is located nearby

  • This is a unique place called Shibamata Futen.

  • It used to be the dormitory for city workers, but has since been converted to a hostel.

  • While I haven't been to many hostels in my life, this one seems rather on the upscale side

  • Here's the lobby and like with any other accommodation facility in Japan, foreign visitors are required to fill in their nationality

  • Passport number, name, address and occupation into a guest registration form. They'll also need to show their passport

  • So that a photocopy can be taken. It's the law for all accommodations in Japan

  • Because this is a former dormitory and it's newly renovated. It's unique in what you'll find

  • They have rooms that are more japanese-style so futons on tatami mats

  • Some quasi Japanese so futons on raised tatami mats. Again, you see the boundary, so don't bring in your shoes

  • However, they have a whole western section in this place. So in these rooms walking in with shoes is a-ok

  • All the rooms are hostel rooms. So no frills. It's just a room, a bed, and that's about it

  • But like the capsule hotels, there're lots of shared spaces.

  • In this one, there's a meeting room, although I don't think you'll be hanging out here

  • There's a hangout room. Although they may have said this was the library, but I can't remember.

  • And there's a very spacious and well-equipped kitchen and dining area. It's quite nice

  • Something that is quite convenient and affordable is the laundry room

  • 200 yen to wash 100 yen to dry

  • We have shower facilities, but not baths, which is quite rare for Japanese accomodations. Although I don't know

  • what's the norm for hostels in Japan. The sink room looks just fine.

  • And the toilets, they are the latest. So no worries on this front

  • one great thing I noticed is that they have a full-on barrier-free bathroom. Top notch.

  • And down the hall, they have a barrier-free room with two beds and while I didn't film it as it was being cleaned

  • There's a bathing room specially designed for wheelchair access

  • You can also rent wheels. Bike wheels that is, so that you can tour around like a local

  • How about some pros and cons.

  • Pros