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  • Da Jia Hao.

  • So I will tell you a little story about human-centered urban development.

  • Also know asLove thy Cityif we borrowed a little from Shakespeare.

  • I will begin with showing you a short movie to tell the situation on earth.

  • Life, a miracle of the universe appeared around 4 billion years ago.

  • And we humans, only 200 thousand years ago.

  • Yet we have succeeded interrupting the balance that is so essential to life.

  • In 50 years, in a single lifetime,

  • the earth has been more radically changed than by all previous generations of humanity.

  • We know the solutions are there today.

  • We all have the power to change.

  • So what are we waiting for?

  • So this is from theHOMEmovie by Yann Arthus-Bertrand.

  • So this message, what are we waiting for, is very true.

  • Because the society and the earth is changing very rapidly.

  • We have been accelerating population, accelerating globalization, accelerating consumerism and as well as accelerating greed.

  • So we desperately need to change and proceed.

  • And I think design is one of the best tools to create this change.

  • And Buckminster Fuller once said,

  • The best way to predict the future is to design it.

  • Which I think is very true.

  • Unfortunately, when we working with city development,

  • this is quite often driven by the developer's drive for maximum profit.

  • And I think we need to rethink this.

  • And instead, try to think of systems and policies going beyond this

  • and looking for adding value to the city and its future development.

  • We have to rise, go up, take this helicopter perspective and trying to see the big picture.

  • And get a holistic perspective and count in everything that is important.

  • And, we have to ask questions.

  • And then I think we should not ask the ordinary how and what.

  • How what to do things?

  • We have to start with a much bigger question.

  • The why question.

  • I think this is extremely important because otherwise we quite often go wrong.

  • Why are we doing certain things?

  • Why is it important?

  • Why is it done in a certain way?

  • And why we have to think differently?

  • Also developing a city is not a project.

  • You bring things, people together;

  • Then it’s ready after a certain time.

  • It’s an ongoing process.

  • City is an epic continuation.

  • City grows for hundreds and thousands of years.

  • So it’s not a short time project.

  • We always have to remember this.

  • We have to be very dedicated, always very dedicated.

  • I tell you a short story about a farm just to understand this dedication we need.

  • Let’s see. Yep, we have to be dedicated.

  • There was a chicken talking to a pig.

  • And she said, “Pig, why don’t we throw a big party?”

  • bring all our friends.”

  • And then pig said,

  • Yeah, what a great idea! Let’s have a party. But what should we eat?”

  • And then the chicken answered,

  • Uh, what about bacon and egg?”

  • Mmm…” The pig responded,

  • That’s involvement for you, but it’s a great commitment for thee.”

  • And I think this is the way we have to be truly committed.

  • Maybe we don’t have to offer a certain part of our body.

  • But still, there’s difference between involvement and commitment.

  • So I will tell you shortly 7 stepping stones to cross the stream of change,

  • and take you to the other side firm and dry.

  • Therein 7 steps.

  • I actually borrowed them from myself.

  • The book called Make Design Matter.

  • There are 7 of them. I’ll introduce them one by one.

  • The first one is about the importance of thinking transdisciplinary or cross-disciplinary

  • and find different ways of thought, to identify new opportunities for revolutionizing the energies.

  • So let’s bring about unlikely marriages.

  • I will tell you about this. It’s a termite.

  • And this represents a building in Harare, Zimbabwe.

  • The American artist Mick Pearce got an assignment to create a new head office for Old Mutual in Harare.

  • And he would like to save a lot of money for the energy bill.

  • So he teamed up with a termite expert.

  • They created this big mound.

  • It could be up to 3-4 meters high.

  • Inside it has a lot of different channels because the temperature in Harare is extreme.

  • It could be 50 degrees in the daytime and down to almost 0 during night time.

  • And the termite could only stands for 1 or 2 degrees change.

  • So in this stack, they have tunnels

  • and even open or close them with wet clay, which makes the temperature stays the same inside.

  • So they got together and they used this idea to create this head office for Old Mutual.

  • Which has no heating system, no air conditioning and it saves 90% of the energy bill.

  • So this kind of hybrid-thinking creates fantastic new opportunities.

  • No.2, we have to have a cultural approach in everything we do.

  • We have to transform.

  • Not only innovate, we have to transform and look through the lens of humanity.

  • And to be able to do that, we have to understand the citizen of the future.

  • Who they are, their dreams, we have to understand the lifestyles, and all the different subcultures in the world.

  • I did a few trips myself yesterday and talked to the younger generation here in Taiwan.

  • So I got a little clues of the future.

  • And meaning is paramount because we are all desperately seeking meaning in life.

  • So we produced arts, sculpture, literature, ballet, music, art, we even film.

  • While we are getting inspired, you got inspiration.

  • And create this emotionality and identities that most cities desperately need and seek today.

  • And Victor Papanek once said,

  • The only important thing about design is how it is relates to people.

  • It sounds quite obvious to all of us, but we tend to forget this quite often.

  • So let’s make design social.

  • This is from The High Line in New York.

  • This was a rusty relic.

  • This was an old railway.

  • And it used to stand there for 50 years without use.

  • And the city were to take it down a lot of times.

  • But this group, Friends of the High Line, came together and created the public park.

  • And this is one of the most popular parks of Manhattan today

  • and all the properties, values rising around

  • and it was so fantastic to walk there so next time youre in New York, you have to go there.

  • No.3, act responsibly.

  • And this goes for when we do products, but it also goes for cities.

  • Because the future generations will ask new questions.

  • And we have to change the rules.

  • Not go on and do what we have done before forever,

  • because well play a much better game if we are trying to adapt to better thinking.

  • An example, this is from the Western Harbour in Malmo.

  • It’s close to where I live.

  • And it is a good example because this is made in a more interesting human scale.

  • It’s a completely new development.

  • But they forced the developers to share the blocks and create a much more diverse city inside it.

  • And they brought in one of Europe’s best skateboard park.

  • and it creates an integration between different parks of Malmo.

  • And I think it’s a good example of future city development.

  • Because I don't think we should just tear away and build new

  • because it’s a lot of history and heritage that we get lost.

  • So let’s remix, reuse, redo, reform, recreate, reinvent and rechallenge instead.

  • I think we will learn a lot if we do that.

  • No.4, make it different.

  • Because I believe standardization is so boring.

  • Because when I’m coming here to Taipei,

  • I don’t want to going to another Louis Vuitton store.

  • I would like to go to the backstreet.

  • Somewhere here where we are, in the market.

  • And find the things that are so typical for this place that I cannot find in other places.

  • I think that’s the important thing because otherwise I don’t have to travel.

  • I could stay home and do everything.

  • So I think this super local, super regional is extremely important.

  • In Sweden, this is a picture from Jukkasjarvi.

  • It’s about the polar circle. No one would going there because it’s extremely cold.

  • You can see it in the picture.

  • But this guy came up 20 years ago with an idea.

  • Let’s tell a new story.

  • Let’s use the cold as an opportunity.

  • So he created the ice hotel.

  • People love traveling from all over the world to sleep on the reindeer beds.

  • So it turns out to be a fantastic success.

  • So elaborate cities.

  • There is probably something, some building capacities you can use to create the future.

  • 5, share knowledge.

  • I would borrow something from the software industry.

  • Eric Raymond, he wrote The Cathedral & The Bazaar about the open-source movement

  • where the cathedral stands for the old, the controlled, the took down thinking,

  • and the bazaar stands for the future, the sharing, the generous,

  • and I think this is important for city as well because the cathedral could represent the old city

  • while the bazaar is the new.

  • And you cannot tear the cathedral down.

  • You cannot move it 5 meters or 100 meters.

  • You have to tear it down.

  • So we really have to rethink, to create the city of the future.

  • Just a little [thing] we have to remember, there’s no such thing as free lunch.

  • So we always have to share and always give back.

  • This guy, he’s called Venkatraman Ramakrishnan.

  • He's a winner of Nobel Prize of Chemistry a few years ago.

  • And his small institution at Cambridge University.

  • They got 12 Nobel Prizes over the last 20ish years.

  • In an interview, they asked him,

  • How come you got this much Nobel Prizes?

  • He said, “Because we have the best canteen in the world.”

  • What do you mean?”

  • "Because we meet up, we share ideas. It’s a professor. It’s a student.

  • We have a morning tea.

  • We have lunch.

  • We have afternoon tea."

  • And this is a famous place for knowledge sharing.

  • So always share knowledge because it’s extremely important.

  • And the more you give, the more you will receive.

  • So For Taipei, where is the canteen for Taipei?

  • Where is the future, exchange of knowledge going to be?

  • No.6, be intuitive.

  • Skate to where the puck is going to be, not to where it has been.

  • It’s quite logically when you read it like this. Steve Jobs quoting Wayne Gretsky.

  • And as well, keep an ear to the ground.

  • The native American Indians always think 7 generations ahead when they are going into a big development project.

  • We have to think about future generations because they are the one to come

  • and will inherit the world we are living.

  • 7, dare to fail.

  • Woody Allen said,

  • If youre not failing every now and again, it’s a sign youre not doing anything very innovative.

  • And it’s true.

  • We have to get going.

  • Picasso, he made almost 100,000 paintings.

  • Woody Allen, 43 movies.

  • He said as well, every director makes a masterpiece after 10 movies so he obviously made 4.3 masterpieces.

  • And I think I can agree on that.

  • Einstein, 300 theories.

  • Edison, 1093 US patents.

  • So genius is 1% inspiration but 99% perspiration.

  • It’s a lot of hard work ahead.

  • So we can learn while we do.

  • Like Facebook.

  • Like this is the original script for Twitter.

  • Put it online and start to make it. Listening what’s happening, adapt and change while you go.

  • I would talk about one of my failures.

  • I was working with the music in the mid 90s.

  • And we had all the big artists. Bruce Springsteen, Tina Turner

  • And one day we got an envelope from a new US artist.

  • I think it was 1984.

  • I was the strongest person in the office so I was asked,

  • Should we do this promotional free concert with this artists?

  • Listening, I looked up to the images.

  • She was pretty, a little bling jewelry, a little jewelry.

  • And I was thinking, no, shell never have a good career.

  • So this is the artist.

  • [music: Like a virgin. Touched for the very first time...]

  • So yes, I turn Madonna down.

  • We have to fail sometimes and be able to come back.

  • So I’m here in Taiwan.

  • So probably it’s something right in the end.

  • So time is running out.

  • Why? Why do we do certain things?

  • And how do we make a success?

  • Is it money? Or what is it?

  • I think it’s about heart, about love, about social things.

  • So this is an inspiration.

  • But Tokujin Yoshioka. He’s a fantastic designer.

  • It’s about poetry. And I bring a quote by Le Corbuster.

  • In the end, it's all about life.

  • I think that’s very true.

  • Because in the end, everything is about life.

  • And my last quote, be the change you want to see in the world.

  • Thank you very much.

Da Jia Hao.

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【TEDx】設計師的人文省思 (於臺北大稻埕迪化街城隍廟旁) (David Carlson at TEDxTaipei)

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    阿多賓 發佈於 2014 年 02 月 03 日
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