Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • [Ojibwe: Hello.

    譯者: Lilian Chiu 審譯者: Tammy Yuting Chiang

  • My English name is Tara; my Native name is Zhaabowekwe.

    (奧傑布瓦語)你們好!

  • I am of Couchiching First Nation; my clan is bear.

    我的英文名字是塔拉, 族語名字是札寶威奎。

  • I was born under the Maple Sapping Moon.]

    我是庫契欽第一民族中的熊族,

  • My name is Tara Houska,

    我在春天的第一個滿月 (楓糖月)時出生。

  • I'm bear clan from Couchiching First Nation,

    (英語)我叫塔拉.豪斯卡,

  • I was born under the Maple Sapping Moon in International Falls, Minnesota,

    我是庫契欽第一民族中的熊族,

  • and I'm happy to be here with all of you.

    我在春天的第一個滿月時 出生於明尼蘇達國際瀑布城。

  • (Applause)

    很開心能與你們齊聚一堂。

  • Trauma of indigenous peoples has trickled through the generations.

    (掌聲)

  • Centuries of oppression, of isolation, of invisibility,

    原住民族的創傷 已經流淌過了數個世代,

  • have led to a muddled understanding of who we are today.

    幾世紀以來的壓迫、孤立與忽視,

  • In 2017, we face this mixture of Indians in headdresses

    造成現今族群認同的迷惘。

  • going across the plains

    到了 2017 年, 我們看到了印第安頭飾的混用

  • but also the drunk sitting on a porch somewhere you never heard of,

    傳遍美洲大平原;

  • living off government handouts and casino money.

    但同時,在你從未聽過的地方, 也有人醉倒在門廊上,

  • (Sighs)

    靠著政府補助和賭博賺來的錢維生。

  • It's really, really hard.

    (嘆氣)

  • It's very, very difficult to be in these shoes,

    這是一件非常、非常棘手的事。

  • to stand here as a product of genocide survival, of genocide.

    這對我而言非常艱難, 尤其身為原住民族的一份子、

  • We face this constant barrage of unteaching the accepted narrative.

    身為種族屠殺倖存者的產物, 站在這裡,很不容易。

  • 87 percent of references in textbooks, children's textbooks, to Native Americans

    我們不斷受到認知被扭曲的轟炸,

  • are pre-1900s.

    教科書、學童用書中 提及美國原住民族的部分,

  • Only half of the US states mention more than a single tribe,

    87% 來自二十世紀以前的資料。

  • and just four states mention the boarding-school era,

    美國各州中,只有一半 會提及一個以上的部落;

  • the era that was responsible for my grandmother

    只有四個州,提及寄宿學校時代,

  • and her brothers and sisters

    這個時代,造成我的祖母、

  • having their language and culture beaten out of them.

    她的兄弟姐妹

  • When you aren't viewed as real people,

    被迫失去了他們的語言及文化。

  • it's a lot easier to run over your rights.

    當你不被當成真正的人來看待,

  • Four years ago, I moved to Washington, DC.

    他們要踐踏你的權利, 就變得非常容易。

  • I had finished school and I was there to be a tribal attorney

    四年前,我搬到華盛頓特區。

  • and represent tribes across the nation, representing on the Hill,

    那時,我完成學業, 到那裡去當部落律師,

  • and I saw immediately why racist imagery matters.

    代表全國各地的部落, 在國會山莊擔任代表,

  • I moved there during football season, of all times.

    我隨即明白為何種族意象事關重大。

  • And so it was the daily slew of Indian heads

    我搬到那裡時,正值美式足球季,

  • and this "redskin" slur everywhere,

    每天都有很多印第安人的頭, (註:華盛頓是紅人隊)

  • while my job was going up on the Hill

    到處充斥著「紅皮膚」這個辱稱。

  • and trying to lobby for hospitals, for funding for schools,

    而我的工作是要去國會山莊,

  • for basic government services,

    為醫院、學校資金、基礎政府服務

  • and being told again and again

    進行遊說。

  • that Indian people were incapable of managing our own affairs.

    我一再被告知:

  • When you aren't viewed as real people,

    印第安人沒有能力管理自己的事務。

  • it's a lot easier to run over your rights.

    當你不被當真正的人看待,

  • And last August, I went out to Standing Rock Sioux Reservation.

    他們要踐踏你的權利, 就變得非常容易。

  • I saw resistance happening.

    去年八月,我去了立巖地區 蘇族印第安原住民保留地,

  • We were standing up.

    我親眼看到反抗行動,

  • There were youth that had run 2,000 miles from Cannonball, North Dakota

    我們站起來了。

  • all the way out to Washington, DC, with a message for President Obama:

    有年輕人跑了兩千英哩路, 從坎農博爾、北達科他,

  • "Please intervene.

    一路到華盛頓特區, 將訊息帶給歐巴馬總統:

  • Please do something.

    「請介入,

  • Help us."

    請做點什麼,

  • And I went out, and I heard the call,

    幫助我們。」

  • and so did thousands of people around the world.

    我走出去,我聽見了呼喊,

  • Why did this resonate with so many people?

    全世界數以千計的人也聽見了。

  • Indigenous peoples are impacted first and worst by climate change.

    為什麼這麼多人會對此產生共鳴?

  • We are impacted first and worst by the fossil-fuel industry.

    原住民族是最先受到氣候變遷影響, 且影響最大的族群;

  • Here in Louisiana, the first US climate change refugees exist.

    我們是最先受到化石燃料產業影響, 且影響最大的族群。

  • They are Native people

    美國首批氣候變遷難民 就在這裡,路易斯安那州,

  • being pushed off their homelands from rising sea levels.

    他們是原住民族人,

  • That's our reality, that's what we live.

    因為海平面上升,被迫離開家園;

  • And with these projects comes a slew of human costs

    這就是我們的現實、我們的生活。

  • that people don't think about:

    這些計畫帶來了大量的人力成本,

  • thousands of workers influxing to build these pipelines,

    大家卻沒去思考:

  • to build and extract from the earth,

    數以千計的工人湧入, 來建造這些管線,

  • bringing crime and sex trafficking and violence with them.

    來建造、抽取地下資源,

  • Missing and murdered indigenous women in Canada

    他們同時帶來了犯罪、 性交易、暴力。

  • has become so significant it's spawned a movement

    在加拿大,失蹤、 遭受謀殺的原住民族女性

  • and a national inquiry.

    實在太多了, 人們因此發起抗議

  • Thousands of Native women who have disappeared,

    及全國性的調查行動。

  • who have been murdered.

    有數以千計的原住民族女性失蹤、

  • And here in the US, we don't even track that.

    遭受謀殺。

  • We are instead left with an understanding

    在美國,我們甚至不會去追究,

  • that our Supreme Court, the United States Supreme Court,

    我們得到的反而是:

  • stripped us, in 1978, of the right to prosecute at the same rate

    我們的最高法院,美國最高法院,

  • as anywhere else in the United States.

    在 1978 年奪去了我們的權利,

  • So as a non-Native person you can walk onto a reservation and rape someone

    讓我們無法和美國其他地方 有一樣的起訴率。

  • and that tribe is without the same level

    因此,一個非原住民者 大可以到保留區裡、強暴某個人,

  • of prosecutorial ability as everywhere else,

    而那個部落並沒有

  • and the Federal Government declines these cases 40 percent of the time.

    和其他地方相同的起訴權利,

  • It used to be 76 percent of the time.

    且 40% 的案子會被聯邦政府拒絕;

  • One in three Native women are raped in her lifetime.

    以前是 76% 的機率。

  • One in three.

    三分之一的原住民族女性, 在一生中有遭受強暴的經驗。

  • But in Standing Rock, you could feel the energy in the air.

    三個人當中就有一個。

  • You could feel the resistance happening.

    但在立巖地區, 你可以感覺到空氣中的能量,

  • People were standing and saying, "No more.

    你可以感覺到抵抗正在發生。

  • Enough is enough.

    大家站出來說:「到此為止,

  • We will put our bodies in front of the machines

    已經夠了。

  • to stop this project from happening.

    我們會以肉身阻擋機器,

  • Our lives matter.

    來阻止這個計畫實現。

  • Our children's lives matter."

    我們的生命非常重要,

  • And thousands of allies came to stand with us from around the world.

    我們孩子的生命非常重要。」

  • It was incredible, it was incredible to stand together, united as one.

    全世界數以千計的盟友 前來和我們並肩作戰,

  • (Applause)

    那很不可思議。站在一起、 同心協力的感覺,很不可思議。

  • In my time there,

    (掌聲)

  • I saw Natives being chased on horseback by police officers shooting at them,

    我在那裡的時候,

  • history playing out in front of my eyes.

    我看到原住民族人 騎在馬背上,被警察開槍追趕。

  • I myself was put into a dog kennel when I was arrested.

    歷史就在我眼前上演。

  • But funny story, actually, of being put into a dog kennel.

    我自己被逮捕的時候, 被丟到狗籠裡,

  • So we're in this big wire kennel with all these people,

    但其實在狗籠裡的故事還蠻好笑的,

  • and the police officers are there and we're there,

    我們一群人被關在大鐵籠裡,

  • and we start howling like dogs.

    警察在那裡,我們在那裡,

  • You're going to treat us like dogs? We're going to act like dogs.

    然後我們開始學狗嚎叫。

  • But that's the resilience we have.

    你們要把我們當狗來對待嗎? 那我們就當狗給你看!

  • All these horrific images playing out in front of us,

    這就是我們的韌性。

  • being an indigenous person pushed off of Native lands again in 2017.

    在我們面前盡是這些可怕的影像;

  • But there was such beauty.

    身為原住民族人, 在 2017 年,我們再次被趕出家園,

  • On one of the days that we faced a line of hundreds of police officers

    但這其中也有美的存在。

  • pushing us back, pushing us off indigenous lands,

    抗爭的某一天, 我們面對一整排數百名的警察,

  • there were those teenagers out on horseback across the plains.

    他們把我們向後推, 將我們推出故土。

  • They were herding hundreds of buffalo towards us,

    那時,有一些青少年 騎著馬穿越平原,

  • and we were crying out, calling, "Please turn, please turn."

    他們把數百頭野牛趕向我們,

  • And we watched the buffalo come towards us,

    我們大聲疾呼: 「請轉向,請轉向!」

  • and for a moment, everything stopped.

    然後,我們看著野牛朝我們過來,

  • The police stopped, we stopped,

    在那一刻,一切都靜止了。

  • and we just saw this beautiful, amazing moment of remembrance.

    警察停了下來,我們也停了下來。

  • And we were empowered. We were so empowered.

    我們就這樣看著這美麗、 驚人、令人難以忘懷的時刻,

  • I interviewed a woman who had, on one day --

    我們因此獲得力量, 我們充滿著力量。

  • September 2nd,

    我訪問過一位女性,她在某一天──

  • the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation had told the courts --

    九月二日那一天,

  • there's an ongoing lawsuit right now --

    立巖地區蘇族保留地告訴法庭──

  • they told the courts,

    他們現在正持續在打官司──

  • "Here is a sacred site that's in the direct path of the pipeline."

    他們告訴法庭:

  • On September 3rd, the following day,

    「管線的路徑正好 經過一處神聖之地。」

  • Dakota Access, LLC skipped 25 miles ahead in its construction,

    九月三日,也就是隔天,

  • to destroy that site.

    達科他輸油管公司(Dakota Access) 跳過了 25 英哩的建設進度,

  • And when that happened, the people in camp rushed up to stop this,

    搶先把那處神聖之地摧毀。

  • and they were met with attack dogs,

    事件發生時,在營區 待命的人趕忙前去阻止,

  • people, private security officers, wielding attack dogs in [2016].

    他們遭受狗群攻擊。

  • But I interviewed one of the women,

    私人安保人員放出猛犬攻擊人, 那時是 2017 年。

  • who had been bitten on the breast by one of these dogs,

    但我訪問了其中一位女性,

  • and the ferocity and strength of her

    她的胸部被其中一隻狗咬傷,

  • was incredible,

    而她的強悍和力量

  • and she's out right now in another resistance camp,

    很不可思議。

  • the same resistance camp I'm part of,

    她現在已經復出, 在另一個抗爭營區,

  • fighting Line 3, another pipeline project in my people's homelands,

    也就是我參加的陣營:

  • wanting 900,000 barrels of tar sands per day

    對抗三號線,那是在我族 土地上的另一個管線計畫,

  • through the headwaters of the Mississippi to the shore of Lake Superior

    規劃一天九十萬桶的油砂運輸量,

  • and through all the Treaty territories along the way.

    通過密西西比河上游, 到蘇必略湖湖岸,

  • But this woman's out there and we're all out there standing together,

    並一路穿越位於 該區域的原住民協定領地。

  • because we are resilient, we are fierce,

    但這位女性仍在那裡, 我們全都在那裡,並肩作戰,

  • and we are teaching people how to reconnect to the earth,

    因為我們韌性很強,我們很強悍,

  • remembering where we come from.

    我們在教導人們 如何和地球重新連結,

  • So much of society has forgotten this.

    我們記得自己來自何處,

  • (Applause)

    社會大眾多已經忘了這一點。

  • That food you eat comes from somewhere.

    (掌聲)

  • The tap water you drink comes from somewhere.

    你們吃的食物來自某處,

  • We're trying to remember, teach,

    你們喝的自來水來自某處。

  • because we know, we still remember.

    我們在試著記得、教導,

  • It's in our plants, in our medicines, in our lives,

    因為我們知道,我們仍然記得,

  • every single day.

    它就蘊藏在我們的植物中、 藥品中,在我們的生活之中,

  • I brought this out to show.

    每一天都在。

  • (Rattling)

    我帶了這個來跟你們分享。

  • This is cultural survival.

    (咯咯聲)

  • This is from a time that it was illegal

    這是個文化遺物,

  • to practice indigenous cultures in the United States.

    它從歷史中倖存下來,

  • This was cultural survival hidden in plain sight.

    從那個美國原住民文化習俗 被法令禁止的時代倖存下來。

  • This was a baby's rattle.

    當時,它因為毫不起眼而留存。

  • That's what they told the Indian agents when they came in.

    這是嬰兒手搖鈴。

  • It was a baby's rattle.

    當時,印第安事務官 來盤查時,他們就是這麼呈報的:

  • But it's incredible what you can do when you stand together.

    嬰兒手搖鈴。

  • It's incredible, the power that we have when we stand together,

    但當人們並肩團結時, 所能做到的事是很驚人的。

  • human resistance, people having this power,

    當我們團結一致時, 我們擁有驚人的力量。

  • some of the most oppressed people you can possibly imagine

    人類的頑強,就是我們的力量。

  • costing this company hundreds of millions of dollars,

    那些你所能想到、 受到最多壓迫的人,

  • and now our divestment efforts, focusing on the banks behind these projects,

    實際上已造成 這間公司損失數億美元。

  • costing them billions of dollars.

    現在,我們把努力的焦點放在 支持這些計畫的銀行,使他們撤資,

  • Five billion dollars we've cost them so far,

    造成他們數十億美元的損失。

  • hanging out with banks.

    目前,我們和銀行聯手,

  • (Applause)

    已經讓他們損失五十億美元。

  • So what can you do?

    (掌聲)

  • How can you help?

    那,你們能做什麼呢?

  • How can you change the conversation

    你們能幫上什麼忙呢?

  • for extremely oppressed and forgotten people?

    你們能怎麼做來和這些

  • Education is foundational.

    極度受迫並被遺忘的族群 開啟新的對話?

  • Education shapes our children. It shapes the way we teach.

    教育是基礎,

  • It shapes the way we learn.

    教育形塑我們的孩童、 我們的教導方式,

  • In Washington State,

    也形塑我們的學習方式。

  • they've made the teaching of treaties and modern Native people

    在華盛頓州,

  • mandatory in school curriculum.

    他們將原住民條約及原住民族人現況

  • That is systems change.

    納入學校必修課程。

  • (Applause)

    這是體制的改變。

  • When your elected officials are appropriating their budgets,

    (掌聲)

  • ask them: Are you fulfilling treaty obligations?

    當你們選出的官員 在編列他們的預算時,

  • Treaties have been broken since the day they were signed.

    問他們:你們兑現了條約的義務嗎?

  • Are you meeting those requirements?

    這些條約在簽訂的那天, 就已經被違反了。

  • That would change our lives, if treaties were actually upheld.

    你們符合這些規定嗎?

  • Those documents were signed.

    如果條約確實地被伸張, 那將會改變我們的生活。

  • Somehow, we live in this world where, in 2017,

    我們確實已經簽署了那些文件,

  • the US Constitution is held up as the supreme law of the land, right?

    不知怎麼地,在 2017 年, 我們居住的這個世界裡,

  • But when I talk about treaty rights, I'm crazy.

    美國憲法被視為 這塊土地的至上法律,對吧?

  • That's crazy.

    但當我談論條約權利,我會很瘋狂。

  • Treaties are the supreme law of the land,

    那很瘋狂。

  • and that would change so much,

    條約才是這塊土地的至上法律,

  • if you actually asked your representative officials

    那將帶來很大的改變,

  • to appropriate those budgets.

    如果你們確實要求民意代表

  • And take your money out of the banks.

    編列那些預算,

  • That's huge. It makes a huge difference.

    還有,把你們的錢從銀行領出來,

  • Stand with us, empathize,

    這些舉動意義重大, 將會帶來很大的不同。

  • learn, grow, change the conversation.

    與我們並肩吧,展現同理心、

  • Forty percent of Native people are under the age of 24.

    學習、成長、開啟新的對話。

  • We are the fastest-growing demographic in the United States.

    24 歲以下的人佔了 原住民族人口的 40%,

  • We are doctors, we are lawyers,

    我們是美國人口中 成長最快速的族群。

  • we are teachers, we are scientists,

    我們是醫生,我們是律師;

  • we are engineers.

    我們是老師,我們是科學家;

  • We are medicine men, we are medicine women,

    我們是工程師;

  • we are sun dancers, we are pipe carriers,

    我們是男巫醫,我們是女巫醫;

  • we are traditional language speakers.

    我們是日舞者、神聖煙斗肩負者; (註:日舞為一種祭祀舞蹈儀式)

  • And we are still here.

    我們是說傳統語言的人。

  • Miigwech.

    而我們還在這裡。

  • (Applause)

    (奧傑布瓦語)謝謝。

[Ojibwe: Hello.

譯者: Lilian Chiu 審譯者: Tammy Yuting Chiang

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

B1 中級 中文 美國腔 TED 條約 原住民 族群 女性 掌聲

【TED】塔拉.豪斯卡: 立巖抗爭及我們為原住民族權利所打的仗 (The Standing Rock resistance and our fight for indigenous rights | Tara Houska)

  • 298 11
    Zenn 發佈於 2018 年 05 月 01 日
影片單字