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  • I remember when I first found out

    譯者: nr chan 審譯者: Jack Zhang

  • I was going to speak at a TED conference.

    我記得當我聽到

  • I ran across the hall to one of my classrooms

    我要去 TED 演講的時候,

  • to inform my students.

    我跑到我帶的其中一個班級,

  • "Guess what, guys?

    告訴那裡面的學生:

  • I've been asked to give a TED Talk."

    「你們知道嗎?

  • The reaction wasn't one I quite expected.

    我被邀請去 TED 演講呢!」

  • The whole room went silent.

    但他們的反應不如預期。

  • "A TED Talk? You mean, like the one you made us watch on grit?

    整間教室只有沉默。

  • Or the one with the scientist that did this really awesome thing with robots?"

    「TED?是那些很勵志的演講嗎?

  • Muhammad asked.

    還是那些科學家和機器人 會做出來的東西?」

  • "Yes, just like that."

    穆罕默德問我。

  • "But Coach, those people are really important and smart."

    「嗯,差不多是。」

  • (Laughter)

    「但教練,只有重要又聰明的人 會去那裡演講耶。」

  • "I know that."

    (笑聲)

  • "But Coach, why are you speaking? You hate public speaking."

    「我知道啊。」

  • "I do," I admitted,

    「你又為什麼會去演講? 你不是不喜歡在眾人面前說話嗎?」

  • "But it's important that I speak about us, that I speak about your journeys,

    「我是不喜歡,」我承認,

  • about my journey.

    「但講關於我們的事何其重要,

  • People need to know."

    那些關於你我的歷程,

  • The students at the all-refugee school that I founded

    是其他人需要知道的。」

  • decided to end with some words of encouragement.

    我所創立的難民學校的學生

  • "Cool! It better be good, Coach."

    決定以鼓勵的話語結束我們的對話。

  • (Laughter)

    「不錯呢!祝你順利,教練。」

  • There are 65.3 million people who have been forcibly displaced

    (笑聲)

  • from their homes because of war or persecution.

    當今有 6530 萬人因為戰火迫害,

  • The largest number, 11 million, are from Syria.

    不得不離家異地。

  • 33,952 people flee their homes daily.

    其中來自敘利亞的 1100 萬人占最多數。

  • The vast majority remain in refugee camps,

    每天有 33,952 人逃離。

  • whose conditions cannot be defined as humane under anyone's definition.

    他們多數來到了難民營,

  • We are participating in the degradation of humans.

    沒有人敢說那裡的條件合乎人道。

  • Never have we had numbers this high.

    我們把人類降級。

  • This is the highest number of refugees since World War II.

    我們從來沒有那麼多人過。

  • Now, let me tell you why this issue is so important to me.

    這是自二戰以來最大的難民潮。

  • I am an Arab. I am an immigrant.

    讓我來告訴你為何 這個議題對我這麼重要。

  • I am a Muslim.

    我是位阿拉伯移民。

  • I've also spent the last 12 years of my life working with refugees.

    我是穆斯林。

  • Oh -- and I'm also gay.

    近 12 年我都投身難民相關工作。

  • It makes me really popular these days.

    噢──我還是同性戀。

  • (Laughter)

    這讓我近期滿受矚目的。

  • But I am the daughter of a refugee.

    (笑聲)

  • My grandmother fled Syria in 1964 during the first Assad regime.

    我是難民的女兒。

  • She was three months pregnant when she packed up a suitcase,

    我奶奶在 1964 年逃離 敘利亞的阿薩德政權。

  • piled in her five children and drove to neighboring Jordan,

    那時她已經懷胎三個月了,

  • not knowing what the future held for her and her family.

    她帶著五個小孩來到鄰國約旦,

  • My grandfather decided to stay, not believing it was that bad.

    面對著未知的未來。

  • He followed her a month later, after his brothers were tortured

    我爺爺決定留下來, 不相信情況那麼糟。

  • and his factory was taken over by the government.

    但在他兄弟被虐待以後, 他也在一個月後過來了。

  • They rebuilt their lives starting from scratch

    他的工廠被政府控制。

  • and eventually became independently wealthy Jordanian citizens.

    他們白手重新起家,

  • I was born in Jordan 11 years later.

    成為經濟獨立的約旦人。

  • It was really important to my grandmother for us to know our history

    11 年後我在約旦出生。

  • and our journey.

    奶奶認為知道自己的歷史和歷程

  • I was eight years old when she took me to visit my first refugee camp.

    是很重要的。

  • I didn't understand why.

    我 8 歲時她帶我參觀了 我第一個難民營。

  • I didn't know why it was so important to her

    我沒辦法理解。

  • for us to go.

    我不知道我們一定要去的理由何在。

  • I remember walking into the camp holding her hand,

    我記得她牽著我的手跟我說:

  • and her saying, "Go play with the kids,"

    「去跟孩子們玩吧。」

  • while she visited with the women in the camp.

    她自己則要拜訪一些女人。

  • I didn't want to.

    我那時不想去。

  • These kids weren't like me.

    那些小孩跟我不一樣。

  • They were poor. They lived in a camp.

    他們很窮還住在難民營。

  • I refused.

    我拒絕了。

  • She knelt down beside me and firmly said, "Go.

    奶奶蹲在我旁邊堅定地說:「快去。

  • And don't come back until you've played.

    在跟他們玩過之前不准回來。

  • Don't ever think people are beneath you

    不要覺得他們比你低下,

  • or that you have nothing to learn from others."

    或覺得他們沒什麼好教你的。」

  • I reluctantly went.

    我不情願地去了。

  • I never wanted to disappoint my grandmother.

    我不想讓我奶奶失望。

  • I returned a few hours later,

    我跟那些小孩踢了一下足球,

  • having spent some time playing soccer with the kids in the camp.

    幾個小時候才回來。

  • We walked out of the camp,

    我們走出難民營,

  • and I was excitedly telling her what a great time I had

    我很興奮的告訴她我有多高興,

  • and how fantastic the kids were.

    那些小孩有多棒。

  • "Haram!" I said in Arabic. "Poor them."

    「阿拉禁止!」我用阿拉伯文說。 「他們真可憐。」

  • "Haram on us," she said, using the word's different meaning,

    「我們也是不潔的,」 她用了這個字的另一個意思,

  • that we were sinning.

    代表我們都有罪。

  • "Don't feel sorry for them; believe in them."

    「別對他們感到抱歉, 而是去相信他們。」

  • It wasn't until I left my country of origin for the United States

    一直到我來美國後

  • that I realized the impact of her words.

    才體會到了這句話的涵義。

  • After my college graduation, I applied for and was granted political asylum,

    大學畢業後我得到了政治庇護,

  • based on being a member of a social group.

    基於我是社會團體的一份子。

  • Some people may not realize this,

    有的人可能沒察覺,

  • but you can still get the death penalty in some countries for being gay.

    但在某些國家身為同性戀 是會被判死刑的。

  • I had to give up my Jordanian citizenship.

    我得放棄我的約旦國籍。

  • That was the hardest decision I've ever had to make,

    這是我做過最艱難的決定,

  • but I had no other choice.

    但我別無選擇。

  • The point is,

    重點是,

  • when you find yourself choosing between home and survival,

    當你得在生存和故鄉做選擇時,

  • the question "Where are you from?" becomes very loaded.

    「你從哪裡來?」就會變成負擔。

  • A Syrian woman who I recently met at a refugee camp in Greece

    我在希臘難民營遇到的敘利亞女人

  • articulated it best,

    描述得很好,

  • when she recalled the exact moment she realized she had to flee Aleppo.

    她在回想自己得逃離 阿勒頗的時候這麼說道:

  • "I looked out the window and there was nothing.

    「我往窗外看去, 但只看到一片荒蕪。

  • It was all rubble.

    到處都是瓦礫。

  • There were no stores, no streets, no schools. Everything was gone.

    沒有商店、沒有街道, 更遑題學校了。所有東西都消失了。

  • I had been in my apartment for months,

    我在公寓住了幾個月,

  • listening to bombs drop and watching people die.

    聽著炸彈墜落,看著人們死去。

  • But I always thought it would get better,

    但我相信明天會更好,

  • that no one could force me to leave,

    沒有人能逼我離開,

  • no one could take my home away from me.

    沒有人能奪走我的房子。

  • And I don't know why it was that morning, but when I looked outside,

    可是一個早晨我看向外頭,

  • I realized if I didn't leave, my three young children would die.

    我驚覺如果再不離開, 我的三個小孩就死定了。

  • And so we left.

    所以我們只好離開。

  • We left because we had to, not because we wanted to.

    這是因為我們必須離開, 不是自己的意願使然。

  • There was no choice," she said.

    我們別無選擇。」她說。

  • It's kind of hard to believe that you belong

    當你無家可歸之時,

  • when you don't have a home,

    當你的母國因 恐懼或迫害而拒絕你時,

  • when your country of origin rejects you because of fear or persecution,

    當你的故土被摧毀殆盡時,

  • or the city that you grew up in is completely destroyed.

    你會很難相信自己屬於 任何一個群體。

  • I didn't feel like I had a home.

    我那時不覺得我有家。

  • I was no longer a Jordanian citizen,

    我不再是約旦人,

  • but I wasn't American, either.

    但我同時也不是美國人。

  • I felt a kind of loneliness

    孤寂感油然而生,

  • that is still hard to put into words today.

    至今仍難以言喻。

  • After college, I desperately needed to find a place to call home.

    大學畢業後,我急切地 想要找一個可以稱為家的所在。

  • I bounced around from state to state

    我在州與州之間徘徊,

  • and eventually ended up in North Carolina.

    最後來到了北卡羅來納。

  • Kindhearted people who felt sorry for me

    善心的民眾可憐我,

  • offered to pay rent

    他們幫我繳房租,

  • or buy me a meal or a suit for my new interview.

    或在我去應徵時幫我買食物或衣服。

  • It just made me feel more isolated and incapable.

    這只讓我更覺得自己的孤立無能。

  • It wasn't until I met Miss Sarah,

    直到我遇到了莎拉小姐,

  • a Southern Baptist who took me in at my lowest and gave me a job,

    一個美南浸信會教徒, 在我人生的低點給了我一份工作,

  • that I started to believe in myself.

    讓我開始產生自信。

  • Miss Sarah owned a diner in the mountains of North Carolina.

    莎拉小姐在北卡羅萊那州的 山區有一間餐館。

  • I assumed, because of my privileged upbringing

    我原本以為是因為我優越的成長環境

  • and my Seven Sister education,

    和七姊妹學院的學歷,

  • that she would ask me to manage the restaurant.

    讓她給我管理餐廳的機會。

  • I was wrong.

    但我錯了。

  • I started off washing dishes,

    我從洗盤子、

  • cleaning toilets and working the grill.

    清廁所、顧烤架開始做起。

  • I was humbled; I was shown the value of hard work.

    我態度謙卑,也明白了 努力工作的價值。

  • But most importantly, I felt valued and embraced.

    但更重要的是,我覺得被重視了。

  • I celebrated Christmas with her family,

    我和她們家一同慶祝聖誕節,

  • and she attempted to observe Ramadan with me.

    她也試著跟我一起過齋戒月。

  • I remember being very nervous about coming out to her --

    我記得對她出櫃那時我緊張萬分──

  • after all, she was a Southern Baptist.

    畢竟她是美南浸信會教徒。

  • I sat on the couch next to her

    我坐在她旁邊

  • and I said, "Miss Sarah, you know that I'm gay."

    並說道:「莎拉, 我是一名同性戀。」

  • Her response is one that I will never forget.

    她的回應讓我永生難忘。

  • "That's fine, honey. Just don't be a slut."

    「沒關係,親愛的。 別當個蕩婦就好。」

  • (Laughter)

    (笑聲)

  • (Applause)

    (掌聲)

  • I eventually moved to Atlanta, still trying to find my home.

    我最後移到亞特蘭大, 仍試著尋找我的定所。

  • My journey took a strange turn three years later,

    三年後我遇到一群難民小孩在踢球,

  • after I met a group of refugee kids playing soccer outside.

    我的旅程有了奇妙的轉折。

  • I'd made a wrong turn into this apartment complex,

    我走錯路進到了一間公寓大樓,

  • and I saw these kids outside playing soccer.

    看到這些小孩在踢足球。

  • They were playing barefoot with a raggedy soccer ball

    他們赤腳踢著殘破的足球,

  • and rocks set up as goals.

    並用石頭計分。

  • I watched them for about an hour,

    我大概看了一個小時,

  • and after that I was smiling.

    之後我笑了。

  • The boys reminded me of home.

    他們讓我想起了家。

  • They reminded me of the way I grew up playing soccer

    想起了我兒時在約旦街道上,

  • in the streets of Jordan, with my brothers and cousins.

    和兄弟姊妹一起踢球。

  • I eventually joined their game.

    我加入了他們的賽局。

  • They were a little skeptical about letting me join it,

    他們一開始還有點疑義,

  • because according to them, girls don't know how to play.

    因為他們認為女生不會踢球。

  • But obviously I did.

    但我當然會。

  • I asked them if they had ever played on a team.

    我問他們有沒有組隊過。

  • They said they hadn't, but that they would love to.

    他們說沒有,但是願意試試看。

  • I gradually won them over, and we formed our first team.

    我慢慢地說服他們,並組了隊。

  • This group of kids would give me a crash course in refugees, poverty

    這群小孩會讓我對難民、貧困

  • and humanity.

    和人性上有了深刻的一課。

  • Three brothers from Afghanistan -- Roohullah, Noorullah and Zabiullah --

    來自阿富汗的三兄弟── 魯拉、努爾拉和扎比伍拉──

  • played a major role in that.

    扮演了主要角色。

  • I showed up late to practice one day to find the field completely deserted.

    一天我遲到,卻發現 場地上沒有半個人。

  • I was really worried.

    我很緊張。

  • My team loved to practice.

    我的團隊是喜歡練習的。

  • It wasn't like them to miss practice.

    他們應該不會錯過才是。

  • I got out of my car, and two kids ran out from behind a dumpster,

    我從車子出來, 兩個小孩從垃圾桶後跑出,

  • waving their hands frantically.

    焦急地揮著手。

  • "Coach, Rooh got beat up. He got jumped.

    「教練,魯被人打啦。他被人圍毆。

  • There was blood everywhere."

    到處都是血。」

  • "What do you mean? What do you mean he got beat up?"

    「你說被打是甚麼意思?」

  • "These bad kids came and beat him up, Coach.

    「有一群壞蛋跑來打他,教練。

  • Everybody left. They were all scared."

    大家都很害怕地跑了。」

  • We hopped into my car and drove over to Rooh's apartment.

    我們上車來到魯住的地方。

  • I knocked on the door, and Noor opened it.

    我敲了敲門,努爾來幫我開門。

  • "Where's Rooh? I need to talk to him, see if he's OK."

    「魯在哪裡?我得跟他談談, 看他好不好。」

  • "He's in his room, Coach. He's refusing to come out."

    「他在他房間,教練。他不想出來。」

  • I knocked on the door.

    我敲了門。

  • "Rooh, come on out. I need to talk to you.

    「魯,出來吧!我們講一下話。

  • I need to see if you're OK or if we need to go to the hospital."

    我得看你好不好,要不要去醫院。」

  • He came out.

    他出來了 。

  • He had a big gash on his head, a split lip,

    他的臉上有一道疤痕,嘴唇也裂了。

  • and he was physically shaken.

    他渾身發抖。

  • I was looking at him,

    我看著他,

  • and I asked the boys to call for their mom,

    並請其他人打電話給他們的媽媽,

  • because I needed to go to the hospital with him.

    因為我得跟他去醫院。

  • They called for their mom.

    他們打了電話,

  • She came out.

    而媽媽也來了。

  • I had my back turned to her, and she started screaming in Farsi.

    她開始用波斯語尖叫,我背對著她。

  • The boys fell to the ground laughing.

    其他男孩笑著在地上打滾。

  • I was very confused,

    我感到困惑,

  • because there was nothing funny about this.

    因為這並不好笑。

  • They explained to me that she said,

    他們告訴我媽媽是在說

  • "You told me your coach was a Muslim and a woman."

    「你們明明告訴我 你們的教練是穆斯林女性。」

  • From behind, I didn't appear to be either to her.

    而我從背後看來一點都不像。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑聲)

  • "I am Muslim," I said, turning to her.

    「我是穆斯林,」我轉身告訴她。

  • "Ašhadu ʾan lā ʾilāha ʾilla (A)llāh,"

    「我作證──萬物非主,唯有真主。」

  • reciting the Muslim declaration of faith.

    這是穆斯林的信仰宣言。

  • Confused,

    她很疑惑,

  • and perhaps maybe a little bit reassured,

    但慢慢開始相信,

  • she realized that yes,

    眼前這個美國樣、

  • I, this American-acting, shorts-wearing, non-veiled woman,

    穿短褲、沒頭巾的女人,

  • was indeed a Muslim.

    的確是穆斯林。

  • Their family had fled the Taliban.

    他們的家庭逃離塔利班。

  • Hundreds of people in their village

    幾百位村民

  • were murdered.

    都被殺了。

  • Their father was taken in by the Taliban,

    他們家父親被塔利班抓走,

  • only to return a few months later, a shell of the man he once was.

    幾個月後被送回來, 已經沒有了生命。

  • The family escaped to Pakistan,

    他們逃到巴基斯坦,

  • and the two older boys, age eight and 10 at the time,

    而兩個分別為 8 歲和 10 歲的男孩,

  • wove rugs for 10 hours a day to provide for their family.

    為了生計每天織地毯 10 小時。

  • They were so excited when they found out that they had been approved

    他們獲知能在美國

  • to resettle in the United States,

    重新開始時有多麼高興,

  • making them the lucky 0.1 percent who get to do that.

    只有千分之一的幸運兒有這個機會。

  • They had hit the jackpot.

    他們就像中了大獎。

  • Their story is not unique.

    這個故事並不特別。

  • Every refugee family I have worked with has had some version of this.

    每個我接觸的難民都有 差不多的遭遇。

  • I work with kids

    我接觸孩子,

  • who have seen their mothers raped, their fathers' fingers sliced off.

    那些看到母親被強姦, 父親被剁手指的孩子。

  • One kid saw a bullet put in his grandmother's head,

    一位孩子看見一顆子彈 穿過她祖母的腦門,

  • because she refused to let the rebels take him to be a child soldier.

    因為她拒絕惡棍 抓她的小孩去當童兵。

  • Their journeys are haunting.

    他們的故事都很駭人。

  • But what I get to see every day is hope, resilience, determination,

    但我每天看到的 是希望,是復甦,是決心,

  • a love of life

    是生活的愛,

  • and appreciation for being able to rebuild their lives.

    還有能夠重獲新生的感激。

  • I was at the boys' apartment one night,

    一晚我在男孩的公寓,

  • when the mom came home after cleaning 18 hotel rooms in one day.

    他們的母親在清完 18 間 旅館客房後回來。

  • She sat down, and Noor rubbed her feet,

    她坐下,努爾開始幫她腳底按摩,

  • saying that he was going to take care of her once he graduated.

    並說他畢業後會好好照顧她。

  • She smiled from exhaustion.

    她疲憊的面容露出了微笑。

  • "God is good. Life is good. We are lucky to be here."

    「感謝老天。感謝生命。 我們在此何其有幸。」

  • In the last two years, we have seen an escalating anti-refugee sentiment.

    近兩年,人們反難民的情緒激增。

  • It's global.

    這個現象布及全球。

  • The numbers continue to grow because we do nothing to prevent it

    這個數字不斷攀升, 因為我們都毫無作為,

  • and nothing to stop it.

    也沒有抵擋。

  • The issue shouldn't be stopping refugees from coming into our countries.

    問題不是阻止難民來到這裡,

  • The issue should be not forcing them to leave their own.

    而是在怎麼讓他們不會 被迫離鄉背井。

  • (Applause)

    (掌聲)

  • Sorry.

    對不起。