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  • Hi. James from engVid.

  • Do you ever notice how you don't always understand what English people are saying?

  • It's like the words are kind of together?

  • Well, I'm going to tell you a secret: You're right.

  • It's called relaxed sple...

  • Spleech?

  • Speech, or blended speech.

  • See, I put spleech together?

  • And it just makes sense.

  • And I'm going to get to that in a second, and I'm going to give you a visual so you

  • can understand where we're going.

  • Notice E is relaxed, he's not really trying hard.

  • When you're speaking your natural language you don't want to try hard all the time.

  • Right?

  • So I actually use another one: "wanna", which I'm not going to talk about today.

  • But we're going to get there.

  • Right?

  • We're going to get to the board and take a look at what I want to teach you.

  • It's how to sound like a native speaker, but also how to understand a native speaker.

  • Okay?

  • Because we do this blending or relaxed speech quite regularly.

  • All right?

  • So it's actually almost more normal...

  • A more normal part of our language.

  • So what is relaxed speech?

  • Well, relaxed speech happens when a native speaker...

  • Speakers-sorry-change sounds or drop letters or syllables when they are speaking fast for

  • things they say a lot.

  • I'll give you an example.

  • Nobody wants to say: "Do you want to go to the movie tonight?"

  • So we say: "Do you wanna go to the movie?"

  • For you, you're like: "What happened?"

  • Well, we dropped the "t"-okay?-and we combined "want" and "to".

  • We even change the "o" to an "a" to make it easier, so: "You wanna go?"

  • For you, you're thinking: "Youwannago", that's a new English word: "youwannago".

  • And it's like: No, it's not.

  • It's "wanna" as in "want to go".

  • Another one is: "See ya".

  • In "see ya" we change and we drop the ending here, we put: "See", and "you" becomes "ya":

  • "See ya later".

  • No one says: "See you later."

  • It sounds weird when I even say it to myself.

  • "See you later.

  • Bye."

  • But: "See ya later" rolls off the mouth.

  • It's because both of these things we say at least 10, 20, 30 times a day, so we change

  • it, we make it relaxed to make it comfortable like E. Okay?

  • Problem for you is you go to school or you're reading a book and it says: "Do you want to",

  • "Did you ever", no one speaks like that but you, so today we're going to change that.

  • Okay?

  • So I'm going to teach you, as I said, how to understand it when it's said to you, but

  • also how to get it out.

  • Warning: Please use the books first or, you know, listen to...

  • We have other videos on pronunciation, use those first.

  • You have to master the base sounds first.

  • You have to be able to say: "Do you want to", because what you don't understand is when

  • I say: "Do you want", when I change it to: "Do you wanna", I almost say that "t", so

  • I have to have practice saying the proper sound before I can drop it.

  • Got it?

  • It's like you got to practice a lot before you can play well.

  • Okay.

  • So, once you've got that down and you start using this, people will go: "Hey, man, where

  • are you from?

  • Because I hear some accent but I really can't tell.

  • Do you want to tell me?"

  • And I say...

  • I did it again.

  • "Do you want to tell me?"

  • You're like: "Woo, no.

  • It's my secret, engVid."

  • Okay, anyway, so today what I want to work on specifically is "do" and "did".

  • Okay?

  • Because there are a few things we say, and there are what I call sound patterns for the

  • relaxed speech that you can learn to identify what people are saying to you.

  • Okay?

  • So I'm going to come over here and I want you to take a look.

  • "Do" or "Did", and here's the relaxed version of it.

  • When we're done this we're going to have a little practice session because with pronunciation

  • it's important you actually practice it, not you take the lesson, you go: "Thanks, James,

  • you taught me and now I know."

  • You actually have to go through it.

  • So the first one we want to do is this one: "Do you want to", easy enough.

  • Right?

  • "Do you want to go to dinner?

  • Do you want to have a friend over?

  • Do you want to have pizza?"

  • When we actually say it, what happens is there are two cases here.

  • In the first case: "do" or "d" changes to a "ja", "ja" sound.

  • And it comes: "Jawanna", so this is gone, the "d" is gone, we changed it to a "j".

  • And remember what we talked about with "wanna"?

  • The t's gone so it becomes: "Jawanna".

  • Now, sometimes we go a step even further, we're so lazy we don't even say the "ja",

  • we just say: "Yawanna", and we go to this: "Yawanna do something?

  • Yawanna go to the movies?"

  • Instead of: "Jawanna go to the movies?"

  • So, "wanna" is an important part, but listen for "ja" or "ya", "ya", "ja" or "ya", same

  • meaning though.

  • "Jawanna go to the movies?

  • Yawanna go to the movies?"

  • Blended speech.

  • Cool?

  • All right, that's the first one.

  • Next one, have you ever seen this lesson before?

  • "I don't know.

  • I dunno."

  • I'm not Jamaican, in case you're going: "It's Jamaican" or another language group.

  • "Don't know" becomes "Dunno".

  • "t" is dropped.

  • Now, before you guys go: "And you dropped the 'k'!

  • You dropped the 'k'".

  • I don't drop the "k".

  • The "k", as you can see here, is not voiced.

  • We never say: "k-now", "Do you k-now what I'm talking about?"

  • It's silent.

  • So when I'm writing it I'm just showing it here that it sounds...

  • "Know" and "no" sound the exact same.

  • They drop the "t", push it together and it's: "I dunno."

  • So: -"Do you know where John is?"

  • -"I dunno."

  • -"Is Mr. E drinking again?"

  • -"I dunno."

  • Right?

  • So: "dunno".

  • So, "dunno" is actually a word or two words.

  • Okay?

  • And you can see here: "Do not know" becomes: "Don't know" to "Dunno".

  • "Did you eat yet?"

  • Why did you write that one?

  • If you're not from planet Earth, understand, you're correct.

  • Why would I write that?

  • If you're from planet Earth, everybody's mother asks you at least once a day: "Did you eat

  • yet?

  • Did you eat yet?

  • Have you eaten yet?

  • Did you eat yet?"

  • All right?

  • Well, half the time because it's three meals a day minimum that we have, and maybe you're

  • standing with your friend, he's going to go: "J'eat yet?

  • J'eat yet?"

  • J'eat?

  • What is "j'eat"?

  • It's like a type of food?

  • No.

  • It's...

  • Remember up here I told you how the "j", the "d" changes to a "j", notice that there's

  • a pattern here: "d" changes to a "j".

  • Ooo.

  • Someone says: "Hey.

  • Hey, man.

  • J'eat yet?

  • J'eat yet?"

  • Sometimes it's even "jet".

  • I had a hard time.

  • Okay, look, I got to be honest, sometimes when you're doing a lesson you learn stuff

  • that you didn't know that you said.

  • "J'eat yet?"

  • It's like: "What?

  • That sounds crazy."

  • But people say it really fast: "D'eat yet?"

  • When you say: "J'eat yet?

  • Jet?"

  • I can't even say it.

  • Okay?

  • Sometimes it sounds like a "j" sound.

  • It'll sound like a "j" sound to you.

  • Okay?

  • "J'eat yet", "jet".

  • "J'eat yet" is more common.

  • Sometimes it sounds like that, but I'm not even going to do it.

  • I'm embarrassing myself, okay?

  • And I speak quickly.

  • Okay?

  • But every once in a while that will come out instead of even "yet", it just gets blended

  • so much it disappears.