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  • - Some people see the thing that they want

  • and some people see the thing

  • that prevents them from getting the thing that they want.

  • It's as if an entire generation

  • is standing at the foot of a mountain,

  • they know exactly what they want, they can see the summit,

  • what they can't see is the mountain.

  • People put Harley Davidson logos on their body

  • to say something about who they are, corporate logo.

  • Ain't not Proctor and Gambles tattooed on anybody's arm.

  • Passion is the feeling you have

  • that you would probably do this for free,

  • you know, and you can't believe somebody pays you to do it.

  • - He's an author, speaker, and consultant

  • who writes on leadership and management.

  • He joined the Rand Corporation in 2010

  • where he advises our military innovation and planning.

  • He's known for popularizing the concepts

  • of the golden circle, and to start with why.

  • He's Simon Sinek, and here's my take

  • on his top 10 rules for success.

  • Rule number six is my personal favorite,

  • and make sure to stick around all the way to the end

  • for some special bonus clips, and as always,

  • if Simon says something that really,

  • really resonates with you, please leave it

  • in the comments below and put quotes around it

  • so other people can be inspired as well.

  • (electronic whooshing)

  • (upbeat instrumental music)

  • Let me tell you a story.

  • So a friend of mine and I,

  • we went for a run in Central Park.

  • The Road Runner's Organization,

  • on the weekends they host races.

  • And it's very common, at the end of the race

  • they'll have a sponsor who will give away something,

  • apples or bagels, or something.

  • And on this particular day when we got to

  • the end of the run there were some free bagels,

  • and they had picnic tables set up,

  • and on one side was a group of volunteers.

  • On the table were boxes of bagels,

  • and on the other side was a long line of runners

  • waiting to get their free bagel.

  • So I said to my friend, "Let's get a bagel."

  • And he looked at me and said, "Nah, that line's too long."

  • And I said, "Free bagel."

  • And he said, "I don't want to wait in line."

  • And I was like, "Free bagel."

  • (audience laughing)

  • And he said, "Nah, it's too long!"

  • And that's when I realized that

  • there's two ways to see the world.

  • Some people see the thing that they want,

  • and some people see the thing that prevents them

  • from getting the thing that they want.

  • I could only see the bagels.

  • He could only see the line.

  • (audience laughing)

  • And so I walked up to the line,

  • I leaned in between two people,

  • put my hand in the box, and pulled out two bagels.

  • And no one got mad at me, because the rule is

  • you can go after whatever you want,

  • you just cannot deny anyone else

  • to go after whatever they want.

  • Now I had to sacrifice choice,

  • I didn't get to choose which bagel I got,

  • I got whatever I pulled out,

  • but I didn't have to wait in line.

  • So the point is, you don't have to wait in line.

  • You don't have to do it the way everybody else has done it.

  • You can do it your way, you can break the rules,

  • you just can't get in the way of

  • somebody else getting what they want.

  • That's rule number one.

  • Performing under pressure, whether it's me,

  • or anybody else is, is the same.

  • You know, I have the same pressures as anyone else,

  • there's time, there's performance,

  • there's financial, I mean, there are,

  • you know, there's deadlines.

  • My pressures are not unique.

  • The situations may be different, or, you know,

  • but everybody has the same kinds of pressures.

  • But what I found, or what I find fascinating,

  • is the interpretation for the stimuli,

  • if, let me explain.

  • So I was watching the Olympics,

  • this last summer Olympics, and I was amazed

  • at how bad the questions were that

  • the reporters would ask all the athletes.

  • And almost always they would ask the same question,

  • whether they were about to compete,

  • or after they competed: "Were you nervous?"

  • Right?

  • And to a T, all the athletes went, "No."

  • Right?

  • And what I realized, is it's not that they're not nervous,

  • it's their interpretation of what's

  • happening in their bodies, I mean,

  • what happens when you're nervous?

  • Right?

  • Your heart rate starts to go, (sighs) you're,

  • you know, you sort of get a little tense,

  • you get a little sweaty, right?

  • You have expectation of what's coming,

  • and we interpret that as "I'm nervous."

  • Now what's the interpretation of excited?

  • Your heart rate starts to go, you become,

  • you're anticipating what's coming, right?

  • You get a little sort of like, tense,

  • it's all the same thing, it's the same stimuli.

  • Except these athletes, these Olympic quality athletes

  • have learned to interpret the stimuli

  • that the rest of us would say is "nervous" as "excited."

  • They all said the same thing,

  • "No, I'm not nervous, I'm excited."

  • And so I've actually practiced it just to tell myself

  • when I start to get nervous, that this is excitement.

  • - Yeah. - You know?

  • And so where when you-- I used to speak in front

  • of a large audience, and somebody would say,

  • "How do you feel?"

  • And I used to say, "A little nervous."

  • Now when somebody says, "How do you feel?"

  • I'm like, "Pretty excited, actually!"

  • And it came from just sort of telling myself,

  • "No, no, no, this is excitement."

  • And it becomes a little bit automatic later on.

  • But it's kind of a remarkable thing,

  • to deal with pressure by interpreting what your body

  • is experiencing as excitement rather than nerves.

  • And it's really kind of effective,

  • it makes you want to rush forward rather than pull back,

  • and yet it's the same experience.

  • I talk to so many smart, fantastic, ambitious, idealistic,

  • hardworking kids, and they're right out of college,

  • they're in their entry-level jobs,

  • and I'll ask them, "How's it goin'?"

  • And they'll say, "I think I'm going to quit."

  • And I'm like, "Why?"

  • And they say to me, "I'm not making an impact."

  • I'm like, "You know you've been here eight months, right?"

  • (audience laughing)

  • They treat the sense of fulfillment,

  • or even love, like it's a scavenger hunt,

  • like it's something you look for.

  • My millennial friends, they've gone through so many jobs,

  • they're either getting fired, I mean, it was mutual.

  • (audience laughing)

  • Or they're quitting because they're not making an impact,

  • or they're not finding the thing they're looking for,

  • they're not feeling fulfilled, as if it's a scavenger hunt.

  • Love, a job you find joy from,

  • is not something you discover!

  • It's not like, "I found love!"

  • Here it is.

  • "I found a job I love", that's not how it works.

  • Both of those things require hard work,

  • you are in love because you work very hard

  • every single day of your life to stay in love.

  • You find a job that brings you ultimate joy

  • because you work hard every single day

  • to serve those around you, and you maintain that joy,

  • it's not a discovery!

  • But the problem is the sense of impatience!

  • It's as if an entire generation

  • is standing at the foot of a mountain,

  • they know exactly what they want, they can see the summit,

  • what they can't see is the mountain.

  • This large, immovable object.

  • That doesn't mean you have to do your time,

  • that's not what I'm talking about.

  • Take a helicopter, climb, I don't care,

  • but there's still a mountain.

  • Life, career fulfillment, relationships, are journeys.

  • The problem is, this entire generation

  • has an institutionalized sense of impatience,

  • and do they have the patience to go on the journey

  • to maintain love, to feel fulfilled,

  • or do they just quit, and on to the next,

  • dump, and on to the next?

  • Ghost, and on to the next.

  • In the eighteenth century there was something

  • that spread across Europe and eventually

  • made it's way to America, called Puerperal fever,

  • also known as the 'black death of childbed'.

  • Basically what was happening is women were giving birth

  • and they would die within 48 hours after giving birth.

  • This black death of childbirth was the ravage of Europe

  • and it got worse, and worse, and worse

  • over the course of over a century.

  • In some hospitals it was high as 70% of women who gave birth

  • who would die as a result of giving birth.

  • But this was the Renaissance, this was the time

  • of empirical data and science, and we had thrown away

  • things like tradition and mysticism.

  • These were men of science, these were doctors.

  • And these doctors and men of science

  • wanted to study and try and find the reason

  • for this black death of childbed,

  • and so they got to work studying.

  • They would study the corpses of the women who had died,

  • and in the morning they would conduct autopsies,

  • and then in the afternoon they would go

  • and deliver babies and finish their rounds.

  • And it wasn't until somewhere in the mid 1800's

  • that Doctor Oliver Wendell Holmes,

  • father of Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes,

  • realized, that all of these doctors

  • who were conducting autopsies in the morning

  • weren't washing their hands before

  • they delivered babies in the afternoon.

  • And he pointed it out, and said, "Guys, you're the problem."

  • And they ignored him, and called him crazy, for 30 years.

  • Until finally somebody realized

  • that if they simply washed their hands, it would go away.

  • And that's exactly what happened.

  • When they started sterilizing their instruments

  • and washing their hands,

  • the black death of childbed disappeared.

  • My point is, the lesson here is,

  • sometimes, you're the problem.

  • (audience laughing)

  • We've seen this happen all too recently

  • with our new men of science and empirical studiers,

  • and these men of finance,

  • who are smarter than the rest of us

  • until the thing collapsed.

  • And they blamed everything else except themselves.

  • And my point is take accountability for your actions.

  • You can take all the credit in the world

  • for the things that you do right,

  • as long as you also take responsibility

  • for the things you do wrong, it must be a balanced equation.

  • You don't get it one way and not the other,

  • you get to take credit when you also take accountability.

  • I spoke at an education summit for Microsoft,

  • I also spoke at an education summit for Apple.

  • At the education summit for Microsoft,

  • I would say that 70% of the executives

  • spent about 70% of their presentations

  • talking about how to beat Apple.

  • (audience laughing)

  • At the Apple education summit 100% of the executives

  • spent 100% of their presentations

  • talking about how to help teachers teach,

  • and how to help students learn.

  • One is playing this way, and one is playing that way.

  • One is playing finite, and the other is playing infinite.

  • Guess which one gets frustrated?

  • (audience laughing)

  • So at the end of my talk at Microsoft they gave me a gift,