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  • Slam Dunk is a sports-themed manga series written and illustrated by Takehiko Inoue

  • about a basketball team from Shōhoku High School. It was serialized in Shueisha's Weekly

  • Shōnen Jump in Japan from 1990 to 1996 and was also been adapted into an anime series

  • by Toei Animation which had been broadcast worldwide, enjoying much popularity particularly

  • in Japan, several other Asian countries and Europe. As of 2012, Slam Dunk had sold 120

  • million copies in Japan alone, making it one of the best-selling manga series in history.

  • Inoue later used basketball as a central theme in two subsequent manga titles: Buzzer Beater

  • and Real. In 2010, Inoue received special commendations from the Japan Basketball Association

  • for helping popularize basketball in Japan.

  • Plot

  • Hanamichi Sakuragi is a delinquent outcast and leader of a gang. Sakuragi, being very

  • unpopular with girls, has been rejected by them 50 times. In his first year at Shohoku

  • High School, he finds out that Haruko Akagi is the girl of his dreams, and is happy when

  • she is not scared of him like all the other girls he has asked out.

  • Haruko Akagi, who recognizes Sakuragi's athleticism, introduces him to the Shohoku basketball team.

  • Sakuragi was reluctant to join the team at first because he had no previous background

  • in any sports and thought that basketball was a game for losers. Sakuragi, despite his

  • immaturity and hot temper, proves to be a natural athlete with potential and joins the

  • team in order to impress Haruko and prove that he is worthy of her. Later on, Sakuragi

  • realizes that his love for the sport equals that of his crush on Haruko. Kaede Rukawa —

  • Sakuragi's bitter rival, the star rookie and a "girl magnet" — joins the team at the

  • same time. Hisashi Mitsui, an ex-junior high school MVP, and Ryota Miyagi, a short but

  • fast player, both also rejoin the team and together these four struggle to complete team

  • captain Takenori Akagi's dream of making Shohoku the national champion. Together, these misfits

  • gain publicity and the once little known Shohoku basketball team becomes an all-star contender

  • in Japan. Production

  • Inoue became inspired to make Slam Dunk as he liked basketball since his high school

  • years. After Inoue started Slam Dunk, he became surprised while receiving letters from readers

  • that they started playing the sport due to the manga. His editor even told him "basketball

  • was a taboo in this world." Due to these letters, Inoue decided he wanted to draw better basketball

  • games in the series. With the series, Inoue wanted to demonstrate the feelings from an

  • athlete such as their thoughts when they win, lose or improve at their sport. When he started

  • making Vagabond, he noted that when he was doing Slam Dunk he had a simpler perspective

  • on life as he focused more in victories and success.

  • With the series, Inoue wants the readers to feel achievements as well as love for the

  • sport. Thinking that his success as a manga artist being largely due to basketball, Inoue

  • organized a Slam Dunk Scholarship for Japanese students as he wanted to give back to the

  • sport by increasing its popularity in Japan. However, when asked about the response from

  • readers to basketball, Inoue commented that although Slam Dunk is technically a basketball

  • manga, its story could have been done with other sports such as soccer. He also added

  • that the artwork for the manga was very typical and mangalike in comparison to his newer works

  • such as Real. His experiences with basketball also influenced the story from Slam Dunk:

  • as a youth Inoue started playing basketball to be popular with the girls, but later became

  • interested with the sport in and of itself. This was mirrored in the character of Hanamichi

  • Sakuragi, who starts playing basketball to be popular with the girl he likes, to later

  • become truly fond of the game. Media

  • Manga

  • The series was originally published in Shueisha's Weekly Shōnen Jump since the issue 40 from

  • 1990 until the issue 27 from 1996. The 276 individual chapters were originally collected

  • in 31 tankōbon editions under Shueisha's Jump Comics imprint, with the first volume

  • being published on February 8, 1991 and volume 31 on October 3, 1996. It was later reassembled

  • in 24 kanzenban volumes under Shueisha's JUMP Comics Deluxe imprint from March 19, 2001

  • to February 2, 2002. In North America, an English version of Slam

  • Dunk was published by the now-defunct Gutsoon! Entertainment, which serialized the title

  • in their manga anthology Raijin Comics from 2002 to 2004. Five collected volumes were

  • published under Gutsoon's Raijin Graphic Novels imprint. They were released from July 2, 2003

  • until May 5, 2004. After Gutsoon! went out of business, the license for the Slam Dunk

  • was purchased by Viz Media, which published a preview of the series in the December 2007

  • issue of the North American edition of Shonen Jump. Slam Dunk began serialization in the

  • magazine, starting with the May 2008 issue, as well as in tankōbon format with the first

  • being published on September 2, 2008. As of June 8, 2013, Viz has published 29 volumes

  • of their translated edition. In 2004, Inoue produced an epilogue titled

  • Slam Dunk: 10 Days After, which was drawn on 23 chalkboards in the former campus of

  • the now-defunct Misaki High School located in the Kanagawa Prefecture, which was held

  • for public exhibition from December 3 to December 5. The epilogue, along with coverage of the

  • event, was reprinted in the February 2005 issue of Switch magazine.

  • Anime

  • The anime series, consisting of 101 episodes, was produced by the TV Asahi terrestrial television

  • network and Toei Animation and directed by Nobutaka Nishizawa. It was first aired on

  • TV Asahi from October 16, 1993 to March 23, 1996. It was later aired on the anime satellite

  • television network, Animax, in addition to four animated movies produced. The anime series

  • follows the manga storyline, but leaves out the National Tournament games. Toei compiled

  • the episodes into a series of seventeen DVDs which were released in Japan from December

  • 10, 2004 to May 21, 2005. Toei once again collected the series in three DVD boxes during

  • 2008. All the three boxes have a total of seventeen discs.

  • Toei and Geneon briefly chose to release the anime on DVD after the manga was discontinued,

  • though the anime was also discontinued after only a few volumes. The first DVD was released

  • on March 15, 2005 and the volume 4 was the last one released on June 14, 2005 before

  • they were cancelled. Various episodes from the series were also downloadable in IGN's

  • Direct2Drive service. Toei is currently streaming episodes of the series on-line for a fee and

  • for free through Crunchyroll. Joost also started airing all the 101 as of May 2009 on their

  • website. Each episode is in Japanese, with English subtitles.

  • The music was composed by Takanobu Masuda and BMF. Three CD soundtracks were published

  • during the airing of the series in Japan. The openings, ending and other two themes

  • were collected into the CD soundtrack The Best of TV Animation Slam Dunk, released on

  • July 21, 2003. Films

  • Four films were produced by Toei Animation from 1994 to 1995 while the manga and TV series

  • were still running. They contain largely new material that is either only hinted at or

  • is not presented in the manga. From August 1 to 4, 2006, NHK broadcast all four movies

  • as part of its satellite networks NHK BS-2's Summer Anime Choice line-up, and TV Osaka

  • aired the last three movies from January 3 to 8, 2007. All the films were collected into

  • a DVD box named Slam Dunk The Movie which was released on December 10, 2004.

  • The first film, simply titled Slam Dunk, premiered on March 12, 1994. Set after Shohoku's practice

  • game against Ryonan, the film focuses on a practice game against Takezono High. Before

  • the game, Sakuragi runs into Yoko Shimura, the girl who rejects him in the very first

  • scene of the series, and Oda, the basketball player she rejected him for. Zenkoku Seiha

  • da! Sakuragi Hanamichi, released on July 9, 1994, is the second film from the series.

  • It happens during Shohoku's 4th Round Qualifying game against Tsukubu High. The film features

  • original characters including Godai, an old friend of Akagi and Kogure's, Rango, a wild

  • show-off who is in love with Haruko and quarrels with Sakuragi, and Coach Kawasaki, a former

  • pupil of Anzai-sensei. Shohoku Saidai no Kiki! Moero Sakuragi Hanamichi was released on March

  • 4, 1995. Set after Shohoku's loss to Kainan, and during a practice match against Ryokufu

  • High. Hoero Basukettoman Tamashii!! Hanamichi to Rukawa no Atsuki Natsu, which was released

  • one June 15, 1995, tells that Rukawa's middle school kouhai Ichiro Mizusawa will be paralyzed

  • soon and wishes to have one last game against Rukawa.

  • Video games Numerous video games based on the series,

  • mostly developed by Banpresto and produced by Bandai, have been published for the Japanese

  • market. Two basketball sims titled Slam Dunk Gakeppuchi no Kesshō League and Slam Dunk

  • 2 were released for the Game Boy. The Super Famicom had three games, Slam Dunk: Shi Tsuyo

  • Gekitotsu, Slam Dunk 2: IH Yosen Kanzenban!!, and SD Heat Up!!. Slam Dunk games have also

  • been released for the Game Gear, Mega Drive, and Sega Saturn. A Slam Dunk coin-operated

  • arcade game by Banpresto was released in 1995. Characters of the series also appear in the

  • Nintendo DS games Jump Super Stars and Jump Ultimate Stars.

  • Unofficial game modifications have been made by fans for NBA 2K13.

  • Reception Slam Dunk has more than 120 million copies

  • in Japan as of 2013, making it Weekly Shōnen Jump's fifth best-selling manga series. In

  • 1995, it received the 40th Shogakukan Manga Award for shōnen. The success of Slam Dunk

  • is cited as an influence in the increased popularity of basketball among the Japanese

  • youth during the 1990s. In a poll of over 79,000 Japanese fans for the 10th Japan Media

  • Arts Festival, Slam Dunk was voted the #1 manga of all time. The English translation

  • of Slam Dunk was listed one of the best comics of 2008 by Publishers Weekly. In a survey

  • from Oricon in 2009, Slam Dunk ranked first as the manga that fans wanted to be turned

  • into a live-action film. In the Japanese government's Media Arts 100 Poll of the public's favorite

  • works of art of all time, Slam Dunk took first place in the manga division. The imprint version

  • of Slam Dunk: 10 Days After has been highly popular in Japan, having initially ranked

  • 6th and then 15th in a ranking of Japanese comics.

  • The anime adaptation has also been very popular in Japan. In TV Asahi's Top 100 Anime show,

  • Slam Dunk ranked as the 10th most popular anime. In another poll from TV Asashi but

  • developed by a website, the series ranked 8th. The DVD boxes from the anime also had

  • a good sale in Japan, having appeared in rankings from Japanese Animation DVD Ranking.

  • See also

  • J. R. Sakuragi — Japanese-American basketball player who coincidentally shares Sakuragi's

  • name

  • Notes

  • References

  • External links Slam Dunk at Shueisha

  • Slam Dunk at Toei Animation Slam Dunk at Anime News Network's encyclopedia

  • Slam Dunk at Anime News Network's encyclopedia

Slam Dunk is a sports-themed manga series written and illustrated by Takehiko Inoue

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大灌籃 (Slam Dunk (manga))

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