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  • Hi.

  • I'd like to start by asking you all to go to your happy place, please.

  • Yes, your happy place,

  • I know you've got one even if it's fake.

  • (Laughter)

  • OK, so, comfortable?

  • Good.

  • Now I'd like to you to mentally answer the following questions.

  • Is there any strip lighting in your happy place?

  • Any plastic tables?

  • Polyester flooring?

  • Mobile phones?

  • No?

  • You do surprise me.

  • I think we all know that our happy place

  • is meant to be somewhere natural, outdoors -

  • on a beach, fireside.

  • We'll be reading or eating or knitting.

  • And we're surrounded by natural light and organic elements.

  • Even ink and paper invokes more happiness

  • than, well, daily reality.

  • So it seems fair to say that natural things make us happy.

  • And happiness is a great motivator; we strive for happiness.

  • Perhaps that's why we're always redesigning everything,

  • in the hopes that our solutions might feel more natural.

  • So let's start there -

  • with the idea that good design should feel natural.

  • Your phone is not very natural.

  • And you probably think you're addicted to your phone,

  • but you're really not.

  • We're not addicted to devices,

  • we're addicted to the information that flows through them.

  • I wonder how long you would be happy in your happy place

  • without any information from the outside world.

  • Your phone is a conduit to that information

  • and before that, we used personal computers.

  • And before that, we used telegraph wires and newspapers.

  • Innovations that shrank the world.

  • We are a little bit addicted there.

  • How you feel about that is up to you.

  • I'm interested in how we access that information,

  • how we experience it.

  • We're moving from a time of static information,

  • held in books and libraries and bus stops,

  • through a period of digital information,

  • towards a period of fluid information,

  • where your children will expect to be able to access anything, anywhere at any time,

  • from quantum physics to medieval viticulture,

  • from gender theory to tomorrow's weather,

  • just like switching on a light bulb -

  • Imagine that.

  • It's the dawn of the light bulb, about 1880.

  • At that time, electricity was considered dangerous.

  • And mystical.

  • And misunderstood.

  • Information is your children's electricity.

  • Only they probably won't value it very much

  • in exactly the same way

  • as you probably don't value being able to switch on a light bulb.

  • So, a lot of implications there.

  • But let's stick with our principle that humans love information.

  • Humans also like simple tools.

  • Your phone is not a very simple tool.

  • A fork is a simple tool.

  • (Laughter)

  • I hope they're not planning to give us sporks for lunch

  • because we like knives and spoons and forks

  • And we don't like them made of plastic,

  • in the same way I don't really like my phone very much -

  • it's not how I want to experience information.

  • I think there are better solutions than a world mediated by screens.

  • The Internet of things doesn't just mean your phone talking to your fridge,

  • it means everyday objects that can behave like apps.

  • Not just tweet that your cheese is getting old.

  • I don't hate screens, but I don't feel -

  • and I don't think any of us feel that good

  • about how much time we spend slouched over them.

  • Fortunately,

  • the big tech companies seem to agree.

  • They're actually heavily invested in touch and speech and gesture,

  • and also in senses -

  • things that can turn dumb objects, like cups,

  • and imbue them with the magic of the Internet,

  • potentially turning this digital cloud

  • into something we might touch and move.

  • Before smart phones this was actually the future,

  • and it had names like ubiquitous computing,

  • and tangible media.

  • You know, things you can feel.

  • We're not all 25 after all.

  • We need physical digital solutions

  • for the problems of ever decreasing font sizes

  • and tiny fiddly keyboards.

  • The parents in crisis over screen time

  • need physical digital toys teaching their kids to read,

  • as well as family-safe app stores.

  • And I think, actually, that's already really happening.

  • Reality is richer than screens.

  • I mean, you're all here, at the Opera House.

  • And I think, intuitively, we know that that's a better experience

  • than watching on the live stream.

  • (Laughter)

  • But, why?

  • They can see everything I do, they can hear everything I say

  • and I don't smell.

  • I am fascinated by the science of this.

  • I think it has something to do with depth perception.

  • Like, the screen is turning off the bit of my brain

  • telling me how hard I'd have to throw a hackey sack

  • to hit this gentleman in the fourth row.

  • But I don't know.

  • It's not very TEDx, really, is it, to stand up here on the stage

  • telling you all the things I don't know.

  • But these are the things that fascinate us

  • and drive our creative practice.

  • For example, I love books.

  • For me they are time machines - atoms and molecules bound in space,

  • from the moment of their creation to the moment of my experience.

  • But frankly,

  • the content's identical on my phone.

  • So what makes this a richer experience than a screen?

  • I mean, scientifically.

  • We need screens, of course.

  • I'm going to show film, I need the enormous screen.

  • But there's more than you can do with these magic boxes.

  • Your phone is not the Internet's door bitch.

  • (Laughter)

  • We can build things - physical things,

  • using physics and pixels,

  • that can integrate the Internet into the world around us.

  • And I'm going to show you a few examples of those.

  • A while ago, I got to work with a design agency, Berg,

  • on an exploration of what the Internet without screens might actually look like.

  • And they showed us a range ways

  • that light can work with simple senses and physical objects

  • to really bring the Internet to life, to make it tangible.

  • Like this wonderfully mechanical YouTube player.

  • And this was an inspiration to me.

  • Next I worked with the Japanese agency, AQ,

  • on a research project into mental health.

  • We wanted to create an object

  • that could capture the subjective data around mood swings

  • that's so essential to diagnosis.

  • This object captures your touch,

  • so you might press it very hard if you're angry,

  • or stroke it if you're calm.

  • It's like a digital emoji stick.

  • And then you might revisit those moments later,

  • and add context to them online.

  • Most of all,

  • we wanted to create an intimate, beautiful thing

  • that could live in your pocket

  • and be loved.

  • The binoculars are actually a birthday present

  • for the Sydney Opera House's 40th anniversary.

  • Our friends at Tellart in Boston brought over a pair of street binoculars,

  • the kind you might find on the Empire State Building,

  • and they fitted them with 360-degree views

  • of other iconic world heritage sights -

  • (Laughter)

  • using Street View.

  • And then we stuck them under the steps.

  • So, they became this very physical, simple re-appropriation,

  • or like a portal to these other icons.

  • So you might see Versailles or Shackleton's Hut.

  • Basically, it's virtual reality circa 1955.

  • (Laughter)

  • The Cube started off as an incredibly geeky

  • code and video project,

  • but it ended up being about what happens when you put a phone in a box.

  • A lot of our projects start off this way,

  • as cardboard and sellotape.

  • We made a web version of this, it's a bit complicated

  • and a touch screen version for phones,

  • but what really stunned us was how transformative it was.

  • When we put the phone in the box.

  • And then use the sensors on the phone

  • to control the cube on the screen.

  • We now call this Hide the tech.

  • And it made it magical and emotional.

  • In our office we use hacky sacks to exchange URLs.

  • This is incredibly simple, it's like your Opal card.

  • You basically put a website on the little chip in here,

  • and then you do this and ... bosh! -

  • the website appears on your phone.

  • It's about 10 cents.

  • Treehugger is a project that we're working on

  • with Grumpy Sailor and Finch, here in Sydney.

  • And I'm very excited about what might happen

  • when you pull the phones apart and you put the bits into trees,

  • and that my children might have an opportunity

  • to visit an enchanted forest guided by a magic wand,

  • where they could talk to digital fairies and ask them questions,

  • and be asked questions in return.

  • As you can see,

  • we're at the cardboard stage with this one.

  • (Laughter)

  • But I'm very excited

  • by the possibility of getting kids back outside without screens,

  • but with all the powerful magic of the Internet at their fingertips.

  • And we hope to have something like this working by the end of the year.

  • So to make that all a bit more physical,

  • we have a little lunchtime demo.

  • Downstairs are a number of teddy bears

  • who have lost their surprisingly famous owners.

  • They're all sitting down by the Curiosity Coffee

  • in the lobby, down there - I don't know which one it's called -

  • that one.

  • (Laughter)

  • And what we'd like you to do is get together

  • in a group, maybe with people you don't know,

  • get a bear and take him for a walk around the concert hall

  • and as you walk around, the bear will tell you its life story.

  • And we'd like you to gain clues from this,

  • and work out who their owner might be.

  • And then we'd like you to bring them back, please.

  • (Laughter)

  • With an answer.

  • I think there are even prizes.

  • We are calling it

  • TEDdyx

  • (Laughter)

  • So let's recap.

  • Humans like natural solutions.

  • Humans love information.

  • Humans need simple tools.

  • These principles should underpin how we design for the future,

  • not just for the Internet.

  • You may feel uncomfortable about the age of information that we're moving into.

  • You may feel challenged, rather than simply excited.

  • Guess what? Me too.

  • It's a really extraordinary period of human history.

  • We are the people that actually build our world,

  • there are no artificial intelligences...

  • yet.

  • (Laughter)

  • It's us - designers, architects, artists, engineers.

  • And if we challenge ourselves,

  • I think that actually we can have a happy place

  • filled with the information we love,

  • that feels as natural and as simple as switching on a light bulb.

  • And although it may seem inevitable,

  • that what the public wants is watches and websites and widgets,

  • maybe we could give a bit of thought to cork and light and hacky sacks.

  • Thank you very much.

  • (Applause)

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TEDx】Beyond Screens | Tom Uglow | TEDxSydney (【TEDx】Beyond Screens | Tom Uglow | TEDxSydney)

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    Yi Jhih-dou 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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