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  • Life in the modern city of Tokyo.

  • It all revolves around...

  • coffee?

  • Why don't you leave

  • the "showing around" of this town

  • to a REAL local! Okay?

  • A lot of tourists end up

  • buying stupid things like a fan

  • But how often do you use these

  • in your home country?

  • Join our boys

  • while they tackle everyday life

  • as an expat in Japan

  • in the quintessential coffee houses of Tokyo.

  • Hi! I'm Stan Jedermann.

  • Those of us who visit Japan

  • often find ourselves marvelling

  • at the "oriental" souvenirs

  • we pretty much find anywhere.

  • But how do we distinguish one from another?

  • What are we even looking at?

  • In Japanese,

  • "omiyage" is something that you

  • give someone

  • who didn't join you

  • on your excursion.

  • In other words, a souvenir.

  • But the practice of "omiyage"

  • is so ingrained in the Japanese culture

  • that these touristy areas even develop

  • their own snacks and presents

  • to give someone as omiyage.

  • This is even where the

  • concept of "yuru-kyara" or,

  • local mascots comes from.

  • Today our excursion takes us to

  • the heart of the Japanese tourist area.

  • Asakusa...

  • in the shadow of the Senso-ji.

  • Welcome to Asakusa.

  • This area has been a tourist attraction

  • since the Edo Period.

  • It attracts crowds mostly interested in history.

  • You can find multiple eras

  • portrayed in establishments

  • here in the shops, theatres,

  • and restaurants.

  • This coffee house, only a

  • one minute's walk from

  • the Ginza Line Asakusa Station,

  • is meticulous in preserving

  • the Taisho-Showa period.

  • Let me present to you

  • some of the most popular "omiyage"

  • available in Asakusa.

  • These are fans.

  • These are "ougi,"

  • for dancing.

  • These are "sensu,"

  • for everyday use.

  • These are "uchiwa,"

  • for use in summer.

  • These are keychains.

  • A little flashy,

  • but a cheap and popular gift.

  • This is "okou."

  • It's used for shrines

  • and for the room.

  • Omamori are amulets

  • meant to bring good luck

  • or protection.

  • They are unique to each and every temple.

  • These "shokki" are available here.

  • This is for sake.

  • This is for beer.

  • This is for tea.

  • And this is for rice.

  • Plates like these are available too.

  • Tenugui are available

  • in many colors,

  • and can be used in many ways.

  • These are "geta,"

  • for girls,

  • for guys...

  • for yukata and kimono.

  • "Kanzashi" are hair ornaments

  • used in the following way.

  • Older toys are available in wood

  • and other natural materials.

  • And of course, kimono!

  • There are tourist trap ones

  • which are just made for foreigners' bathrooms

  • and are not used in Japan.

  • And, there are real ones

  • which can be bought second hand

  • for low prices.

  • To recap,

  • Asakusa Coffee-ya in Asakusa

  • is the coffee house we went to today.

  • Our boys toured around Asakusa

  • and reviewed popular souvenirs, too.

  • I hope you learned something today.

  • However,

  • everyone's experience in Japan is different.

  • Which yaro seemed most like you?

  • All information can be found on our website here

  • and be sure to join us next time

  • as we discuss television in Japan.

  • No, the yaro and I are just hanging out!

  • There are no girls here whatsoever!

  • No, no! Nothing!

Life in the modern city of Tokyo.

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去日本買什麼紀念品 - 淺草 - 咖啡芋 #04 (What Souvenirs to Get in Japan - 浅草 Asakusa - Coffee Yaro #04)

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    Yummy Japan 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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