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  • Hi my name is Tony and this is Every Frame a Painting.

  • Today I'm going to talk about one of the greats of the last twenty years

  • the Japanese filmmaker Satoshi Kon.

  • Even if you don't know his work you have certainly seen some of his images.

  • He is an acknowledged influence on both Darren Aronofsky and Christopher Nolan

  • And he has a fan base that includes just about everyone who loves animation.

  • In one decade, he made four feature films and one TV series

  • all of them amazingly consistent, all of them about

  • how modern people cope with living multiple lives.

  • Private, public. Offscreen, onscreen. Waking, dreaming.

  • If you've seen his work you'll recognize this blurring of reality and fantasy.

  • Today, I'm only going to focus on one thing: his excellent editing.

  • So as an editor, I'm always looking for new ways to cut

  • especially from outside the realm of live-action.

  • Kon was one of the most fascinating. His most noticeable habit

  • was matching scene transitions.

  • I've mentioned before that Edgar Wright does this for visual comedy

  • --Scott! --What?

  • It's part of a tradition that includes The Simpsons

  • and Buster Keaton.

  • Kon was different. His inspiration was the movie version of

  • Slaughterhouse-Five directed by George Roy Hill.

  • --I can always tell, you know, when you've been time-tripping

  • This is more of a sci-fi tradition that includes Philip K Dick

  • and Terry Gilliam

  • But even among peers, Kon pushed this idea pretty far.

  • Slaughterhouse-Five has basically three types of scene transitions:

  • a general match cut

  • an exact graphic match

  • and intercutting two different time periods, which mirror each other.

  • Kon did all of these things, but he would also

  • rewind the film, cross the line into a new scene,

  • zoom out from a TV, use black frames to jump cut,

  • use objects to wipe frame, and I don't even know what to call this.

  • To show you how dense this gets, the opening four minutes of Paprika

  • has five dream sequences and every single one is connected by a match cut.

  • Number six is not connected by a match cut,

  • but there is a graphic match within the scene.

  • Just for comparison, the opening fifteen minutes of Inception

  • has four interconnected dreams. Number of match cuts: one.

  • --What is the most resilient parasite?

  • Cuts like this aren't uncommon, but they're definitely not something

  • most filmmakers build a style out of.

  • Usually you see them as one-off effects. Two of the most famous examples:

  • Oh and this one because it's amazing

  • Kon's work was about the interaction between dreams, memories,

  • nightmares, movies, and life.

  • The matching images were how he linked the different worlds.

  • Sometimes he would stack transitions back to back,

  • so you'd be getting used to one scene before you got thrown into the next.

  • All of this made him really surprising to watch.

  • You could blink and miss that you're in a different scene.

  • Even when he wasn't dealing with dreams, Kon was an unusual editor.

  • He loved ellipses and would often just jump past part of the scene.

  • So you'd see a character look at a key.

  • You expect to see her take it, but that doesn't happen.

  • The scene just moves on. Later on, in a different scene:

  • Or you'd see a man jumping out of a window and fade out.

  • We'd then cut to a scene we didn't understand, reveal that this is a dream,

  • back out, and then show the conclusion of the previous scene.

  • Even things like murder, he would do the build-up and cut away.

  • But he would show us the gory result.

  • I particularly love the way he handled character death.

  • Here, an old man dies and the windmills of his hut stop.

  • Then it turns out he's alive, so they start up again.

  • When we finish the scene, the windmill shot doesn't repeat,

  • but you'll notice they aren't moving, implying he is dead.

  • Kon also had a habit of starting scenes in close-up and you'd figure out

  • where you were as the scene went on.

  • Every once in a while, he'd use an establishing shot.

  • And then reveal that it was actually a point-of-view. So without you noticing,

  • he brought you into the character's world.

  • He was constantly showing one image and then revealing that it wasn't

  • what you thought it was.

  • Your experience of space and time became subjective.

  • He could also edit in ways that a lot of live-action filmmakers could not.

  • During an interview, Kon said that he didn't want to direct live action

  • because his editing was too fast.

  • For example:

  • This shot of the bag is only 6 frames. For a comparable moment in live action

  • that was 10 frames. Or how about this insert of a note?

  • 10 frames. But in live-action...

  • 49 frames. Kon felt that as an animator, he could draw less information

  • in the shot, so your eye could read it faster.

  • You can actually see someone like Wes Anderson doing this in live-action

  • removing visual information so his insertsread\" faster.

  • It's worth noting: you can actually cut much faster than this, but the images

  • pretty much become subliminal. Some of these shots are 1 frame.

  • None of this was for cheap effect. Kon felt that we each experience

  • space, time, reality and fantasy at the same time as individuals

  • and also collectively as a society. His style was an attempt to depict this

  • in images and sound. In the course of ten years, he pushed animation in ways

  • that aren't really possible in live action.

  • Not just elastic images, but elastic editing -- a unique way of moving from

  • image to image, scene to scene. And he was helped in this crusade by

  • the studio Madhouse, who did some of their finest work on his films.

  • If you want to see a perfect summation of his work, I present his final film:

  • a one-minute short about how we feel when we get up in the morning

  • This is Ohayou

  • --Ohayou

  • Farewell, Satoshi Kon.

Hi my name is Tony and this is Every Frame a Painting.

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Satoshi Kon - Editing Space & Time (Satoshi Kon - Editing Space & Time)

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    KOKUYO 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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