Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • In this short video,

  • we're going to show you how we use

  • two different animation techniques,

  • both rotoscoping

  • and traditional hand-drawn animation

  • in the TED-Ed Lesson,

  • "Miss Gayle's 5 Steps to Slam Poetry:

  • A Lesson of Transformation."

  • A poetry slam is a competition

  • in which poets are judged on their poems,

  • often for qualities of emotional power

  • and lyrical resonance.

  • Our Lesson was created by Gayle Danley,

  • a veteran slam poet

  • who spent decades teaching children

  • to express themselves through spoken words,

  • a Lesson, which offers a guide to creating poetry

  • with immediacy and power,

  • also serves as a great example of exactly that.

  • It's a story told in the form of a poem

  • that packs a real emotional punch.

  • She introduces Tyler,

  • who's sitting in an 11th grade writing class,

  • struggling with the assignment of having to write a poem

  • based on a personal experience.

  • The story is told from two perspectives,

  • one external

  • and one internal.

  • Miss Gayle's narration sets the stage

  • of the outside world,

  • and spoken word artist Pages D. Matan

  • performs Tyler's inner voice.

  • To set these two realms

  • of inner- and outer-experience apart,

  • a different animation technique was used

  • to illustrate each.

  • The real world was animated by rotoscoping,

  • with a frame-by-frame tracing of live-action footage

  • in black and white line art.

  • The animation depicting the inner-stream

  • of consciousness world of Tyler's memories

  • was traditionally drawn on paper,

  • featured watercolored backgrounds

  • and a more expressionistic design.

  • Once deciding on this general approach,

  • the project went right into pre-production.

  • In animation, pre-production is the planning stage.

  • It's all the decisions that need to be made

  • before going and actually making the thing

  • in its final form.

  • This can include developing

  • the look or design of the piece,

  • experimenting with colors and camera angles,

  • revising the script,

  • and so on.

  • All these decisions are important

  • because they determine how much work and time

  • the production will take.

  • Extra time spent here figuring things out

  • can often save a lot of time down the road.

  • For our project, a storyboard was first created,

  • in which the framing, composition, and imagery

  • for each shot was determined.

  • Then an animatic was made,

  • which is basically a movie of the storyboard.

  • This helped us figure out the timing of each shot.

  • It also helped us get an idea

  • of how well everything would flow together visually

  • between our rotoscoped

  • and traditionally animated scenes

  • once they were assembled.

  • For the rotoscoped shots, we first had to create

  • the live action footage to be traced.

  • Working with what we had in our humble office,

  • we created a classroom of desks

  • using only one small table.

  • We shot this multiple times

  • from each angle the storyboard called for,

  • each time with a different volunteer

  • from among our co-workers.

  • Our source footage elements

  • then needed to be composited,

  • or assembled and arranged together,

  • before we could rotoscope them.

  • A composite is a special effects term

  • for a shot that combines two or more elements in it

  • that were created separately.

  • To do this, we used After Effects,

  • a digital compositing and motion graphics program.

  • The first step was to isolate

  • the part of the frame we needed

  • by masking off the unnecessary negative space,

  • or parts of the frame we didn't need.

  • The individual shots were then each layered

  • into one composite shot,

  • resized and arranged appropriately

  • to create the illusion of them

  • all being there in perspective at the same time.

  • Every third frame was then exported

  • as an image sequence,

  • ready to be rotoscoped.

  • The tracing was done digitally,

  • drawn directly on a Cintiq monitor.

  • The rest of the animation

  • was done by hand on paper.

  • Unlike rotoscoping,

  • here the timing and motion of the animation

  • was all planned out by the animator ahead of time.

  • An appropriate number of drawings were then done

  • to accomplish the movement.

  • Each animation drawing is then scanned,

  • registered,

  • and sequenced together in the computer.

  • That animation sequence is then composited

  • with the layered background art.

  • Camera moves are then plotted out and executed.

  • One way that poetry uses language

  • to communicate emotions and ideas

  • is through the use of metaphor.

  • "Mama's lies are footsteps too many to count

  • making excuses on black snow."

  • Animation's a medium that's also uniquely well-suited

  • to communicating emotions and ideas

  • through visual metaphor.

  • Applying the dual techniques

  • of rotoscoped and traditional animation,

  • each with their own inherent looks,

  • allowed us to visually represent

  • the dual nature of the creative process

  • described in the Lesson.

  • There's the internal aspect of experience and memory,

  • which is mined for inspiration,

  • and there's the external aspect

  • of revealing it to the world

  • through a structured presentation.

  • We combined both techniques for the last shots

  • of Tyler delivering his poem to the world,

  • allowing us to convey in a direct, visual way

  • the power of that moment of communication

  • when internal becomes external,

  • which, in both poetry and animation,

  • is where the magic happens.

In this short video,

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

B1 中級

【TED-Ed】製作TED-Ed課:兩套俚語詩歌動畫化的方法。 (【TED-Ed】Making a TED-Ed Lesson: Two ways to animate slam poetry)

  • 184 30
    稲葉白兎 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
影片單字