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  • Welcome to this Phrasal Verbs master class.

  • Today you're going to learn over 200  phrasal verbs that will help you sound  

  • fluent, sound natural, and sound  professional in English, of course.

  • I'm Jennifer from JForrest

  • English.

  • Now let's get started.

  • This is a long lesson, but don't  worry because it's divided into  

  • individual sections where you'll  learn a group of 10 phrasal verbs,  

  • then you'll complete a quiz, and then  you'll move on to the next group.

  • So let's get started with your first.

  • Group.

  • Number one to come around  to an opinion or an idea,  

  • and this means to change your opinion  or to see a new point of view.

  • Now notice the sentence structure.

  • Because we have two prepositions around and  two, and then after two we need something.

  • We need a noun, an opinion, or an idea.

  • For example, I came around to the new job  after I heard about the benefits package.

  • So remember, this means you changed your  opinion so previously you didn't want.

  • The new job.

  • But now you've come around to itso you've changed your opinion.

  • Now you want the new job because you  heard about the benefits package.

  • We commonly use this without the preposition 2  

  • and without specifying the something when  the something has already been mentioned.

  • For example, at first I didn't want to move  to Boston, but I came around after I visited.

  • So notice I didn't say I came around to something  

  • because the something had already  been mentioned, so I came around.

  • To.

  • The idea after I visited #2 to  get across a point or a message,  

  • and this is when you clearly and effectively  communicate a point or a message.

  • For example, make sure you.

  • Get.

  • Across that, the project is over budgetso if you're having a meeting with a client  

  • and your boss has this very particular  message or idea, the project is over.

  • Budget.

  • And your boss wants you to communicate  that in a clear, effective way.

  • Your boss wants to make sure you get that across.

  • Now we also use this when you're talking,  

  • You're talking, you're talking, and the  ideas aren't really coming out very well.

  • And after a while you stop and you say what  I'm trying to get across is and then you.

  • State your.

  • Point what I'm trying to get  across is the project is.

  • Over.

  • Budget #3 to show.

  • Off.

  • This is when you deliberately display your skills  or abilities in a way to impress other people.

  • Now, this is frequently used in the negative.

  • Don't show off, don't show off.

  • But there's definitely a time and  a place when you want to show off.

  • For example, when you're going to a job interview,  

  • you shouldn't be modest, You should  show off your skills and abilities.

  • You should talk about all your  awards, your accomplishments,  

  • your degrees, the compliments you've received.

  • You want to show off all of your  experience to the interviewer,  

  • so an interview is the perfect time to show off.

  • Also, if you're going for your IELTS exam,  

  • you don't want to be modest with your  knowledge of the English language.

  • You want to show off your abilities  by using a range of grammatical  

  • structures and a range of phrasal  verbs and idioms and expressions.

  • You want to show off to the  interviewer, #4 to count on.

  • Now this is exactly the same  as to rely on or to depend on.

  • So you have three different phrasal verbs  all with on that mean the exact same thing.

  • And this is of course when you trust someone  

  • or something to completespecific task or objective.

  • For example, I can always  count on Selma to stay late.

  • So you can trust Selma to complete the specific  task or objective which is to stay late.

  • And remember you could replace this with rely on I  

  • can always rely on Selma or depend  on I can always depend on Selma.

  • Now we frequently use this in a question response.

  • For example, can I count on you?

  • Can I count on you to close the deal?

  • And then you can reply back and say absolutely  you can count on me #5 to come between now.

  • This is when something disturbsrelationship and that relationship  

  • can be a professional relationship, a social  relationship, romantic family relationship.

  • It can be any kind of relationship.

  • For example, Jacob and Marcus were best  friends until Sylvie came between them.

  • So that's the image you could have.

  • They were close, Jacob and Marcus, but then  Sylvie came between them and now they're divided.

  • Sylvie disturbed their relationship.

  • Now it's very common for a girl orguy to come between a relationship,  

  • but it doesn't have to be a person.

  • It could be that Jacob and Marcus were very  close, but the promotion came between them,  

  • the new job came between themtheir family came between them,  

  • their politics came between themtheir religion came between them.

  • It could be anything between them.

  • Money.

  • Is a good one as well.

  • That comes between people in relationships.

  • And remember you can use this in any type of  

  • relationship number six to put  up with something or someone.

  • And notice this is a 2 preposition phrasal.

  • Verb.

  • Put up.

  • With.

  • Put up with and.

  • We use this to say that you tolerate bad  behavior or unwanted behavior to put up with.

  • For example, I don't know how you put up with.

  • Your.

  • Boss, I don't know how you tolerate.

  • Your.

  • Boss.

  • Now of course we can be more specific and  specify the action that the boss does.

  • I don't know how you put up with your  boss's constant criticism, for example,  

  • or your boss's distasteful jokes, for example.

  • I don't know how you tolerate.

  • It.

  • Now we commonly use this to say I'm not going.

  • To.

  • Put up with and then the behavior.

  • I'm not going to put up with your constant  criticism any longer #7 to bounce back.

  • Now to bounce back.

  • This is when you recover or recuperate.

  • Now you can use this when you recover from  a negative situation in a business context,  

  • like for example a bad sales quarter  or a bad product launch for example.

  • But it can also be when you recover  or recuperate from an illness,  

  • so you can use it in both those situations.

  • For example, in a workplace  situation, you could say,  

  • I don't know how we'll bounce  back from our loss in Q2.

  • So I don't know how we'll recover.

  • And then you could havediscussion how can we bounce back.

  • Does anyone have any ideas on how we can bounce  

  • back now in terms of recovering  or recuperating from an illness?

  • You could say it took me a while  to bounce back after my surgery,  

  • so it took me a while to  recover recuperate #8 to act up.

  • This means to behave badly or strangely.

  • This is very commonly used with  parents describing the actions of  

  • their young children or even their older children.

  • My son keeps acting up, behaving badly, but  we can also use this with devices and objects.

  • For example, my computer keeps  acting up, behaving strangely.

  • My computer keeps acting up.

  • I hope it doesn't break #9  to make it up to someone.

  • This is quite a long one, so pay attention to  this sentence structure to make it up to someone.

  • Now we use this when you try  to compensate for a wrongdoing.

  • For example, let's say it's your best  friend's birthday and you can't go.

  • For whatever.

  • Reason so this.

  • Is the.

  • Wrongdoing Not going to your  best friend's birthday party.

  • Now, if you want to compensate  for that wrongdoing, you could  

  • say I'm so sorry I can't make your birthday party.

  • I promise I'll make it up to you.

  • I'll make it up to you by taking  you out for a nice dinner.

  • I'll make it up to you by  going to the movies with you.

  • I'll make it up to you by buying  you a really nice present.

  • So those are the ways you're going to compensate.

  • Now you might be wondering  what is this it the make it up.

  • To someone.

  • We use it with it because what  you're trying to compensate for  

  • has already been explained, so  you don't have to say it again.

  • Now you can use this in a business context.

  • Let's say you went over budget on a client's  project and you might say to your team,  

  • how are we going to make it up to the client?

  • How are we going to compensate for our wrongdoing?

  • The wrongdoing is you went over budget.

  • And then maybe someone would  suggest we can make it up to  

  • them by offering a discount or offeringfree product, offering an extra service.

  • So those are how you're going to compensate for  the wrongdoing to make it up to someone #10.

  • To barge.

  • In when you barge in, you enter  a place a location unexpectedly,  

  • and you interrupt whatever's taking place.

  • For example, I was in my office  working and this kid just.

  • Barged.

  • In and handed me his CV, but later I hired him.

  • So by saying the kid barged in, it implies that  he didn't have an appointment he wasn't expected.

  • He just.