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  • Hi my name is Tony and this is Every Frame a Painting.

  • Today I'm going to switch things up and talk about problem-solving.

  • One of the reasons I like filmmaking is that sometimes you have to design

  • a solution to a particular stumbling block.

  • For example, how do you show a text message in a film?

  • It's an interesting conundrum. Texting is kinda visual, so in theory,

  • this shouldn't be hard.

  • And yet every time a filmmaker cuts to an insert of a phone

  • you can hear the audience yawning. Many films make it so characters don't text

  • or they read the messages out loud like idiots.

  • Or worse, they invent some reason for the phones not to work.

  • --97% nationwide coverage and we find ourselves in the three percent

  • But in the last four or five years, something's happened. Filmmakers have

  • started adopting a new formal convention the onscreen text message.

  • It has exploded in just a few years.

  • I first noticed it on the BBC version of Sherlock.

  • But after consulting Twitter, we found earlier examples in soap operas

  • teen movies

  • and in films from South Korea and Japan.

  • Regardless of where you first saw it, this is a great example of how

  • film form is always evolving.

  • So why are filmmakers adopting this?

  • I think there's 3 simple reasons.

  • First off, it saves money. If you have a story where texting is important,

  • the director can save a ton of money by not shooting 60 close-ups of phones.

  • All you need is AfterEffects & this guy:

  • --Andrew Kramer here for Video Copilot.net

  • Second, it's artistically efficient. Shot-reverse shot is slow

  • because the phone has to be onscreen long enough to read it.

  • Sometimes in huge, ridiculous grandma font.

  • Onscreen texting solves a lot of this. It allows us to combine

  • action and reaction in the same frame. Best of all,

  • it gives us an uninterrupted view of the actor's performance which is always nice

  • But there's a third reason this has been noticed: elegant design.

  • And this is where Sherlock is definitive This is beautiful, in and of itself.

  • You'll notice: there's no bubble around the text, because

  • the bubble is the first thing that becomes outdated.

  • The font has stayed consistent for each season of the show. The color is white

  • instead of different colors for different characters.

  • We arent told who's sending or receiving which is great because now the audience

  • has to infer based on the message, which increases our involvement.

  • The words appear next to the phone but they float independently.

  • Compare that to this film, where the messages move as if they're attached

  • to the device. Wait no, to the person.

  • No, to the device. Make up your mind.

  • So who knows? Maybe this will be a new convention,

  • maybe it's just a stepping stone. --NO.

  • But while Sherlock seems to have solved how to do text messages,

  • we have another issue.

  • Many many people have tried, but we still don't have

  • that one really good way of depicting the internet.

  • Some methods are not exactly cheap.

  • Others are kinda inefficient.

  • And others... well, you know.

  • I am actually a big fan of one new development: the desktop film

  • where all of the action takes place directly on the screen.

  • --Let me show you.

  • I can't speak for anyone else, but these films are actually pretty

  • similar to how I receive information on a daily basis.

  • Some have emotional resonance.

  • Some are mysterious.

  • And some are wonderfully experimental.

  • But if you want to explore the cutting edge, there's only one place to go

  • --One ticket to Tokyo, please

  • Where for the last 2 decades, animation has been coming up with wild and crazy

  • ways to show the world online,

  • Whether they be Superflat and floating.

  • Or message board posts as intertitles

  • Or plugging into a separate green online world

  • And there's a bunch of other fascinating possibilities that

  • may or may not work in other films

  • but are really interesting just to consider.

  • Even live-action films from Asian directors have tried this.

  • Physical rooms where people chat.

  • An animated world within the cell phone.

  • All of these are experiments and some are honestly failures.

  • But that's good, because people are trying.

  • And for once, this is a level playing field. You and I have

  • as much of a chance of figuring out the solution as the next

  • Hollywood film. For something like this, lack of money is an advantage

  • Remember: cheap, efficient, elegant.

  • For all I know, the solution is already out there.

  • --A hacker

  • Hell, Sherlock may have figured it out.

  • But in the meantime I think it's nice to appreciate a small formal step

  • in the right direction. This is proof that film form is not set in stone.

  • People don't stop inventing this stuff. And right now, at least,

  • I see a big problem we haven't solved yet. And a very level playing field

  • for anyone who wants to go for it.

  • Subtitles by the Amara.org community

Hi my name is Tony and this is Every Frame a Painting.

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A Brief Look at Texting and the Internet in Film(A Brief Look at Texting and the Internet in Film)

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    SATORU MORIICHI 發佈於 2021 年 10 月 18 日
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