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  • Hi.

  • I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com.

  • Let's talk about how to pronounce 100 jobs.

  • When you first meet someone, talking about your job is one of the first topics that comes

  • up in conversation.

  • This phrasal verb "come up" means that it easily arises in conversation, so I want to

  • help you learn a simple, clear way to describe your job.

  • It looks like we have a little friend who is here to help us explain these job titles.

  • I don't know how long he's going to stay.

  • We'll see.

  • It's pretty perfect because I'm wearing this cat shirt today.

  • Well, when someone asks me, "Vanessa, what do you do?"

  • I say, "I'm an English teacher.

  • I teach online."

  • Simple and clear.

  • And usually they ask, "How does that work?

  • Can you do that?"

  • I explain, "Yes, people from around the world who want to learn English find my lessons,

  • and I help them."

  • Great.

  • This is a simple, clear way to explain this.

  • So today, we're going to practice pronouncing a lot of job titles, and I hope that yours

  • is one of them.

  • It's great for introducing yourself, but it's also useful to understand other job titles

  • so that when people say that that's what they do, you can have a little conversation about

  • it or at least understand the word that they said.

  • So, I hope this will help to build your vocabulary and also help you to meet other people.

  • There are a couple ways to describe your job.

  • You could say, "I'm a teacher," or you could say the full sentence, "I work in education."

  • This is the field that you work in.

  • I work in management.

  • I work in construction.

  • You're not saying your specific job title, but you're just generally saying, I work in

  • plus that field.

  • Or you could say, "I work for Google.

  • I work for Apple.

  • I work for a local pizza restaurant."

  • Here, you're talking about the company.

  • As long as it's something well known or maybe well known in your area, you can say the company

  • that you work for as well.

  • Now that we've talked about these two helpful sentences for describing your job, I work

  • in management.

  • I work for Google.

  • Let's get onto some specific job descriptions.

  • I've broken these into different categories.

  • Some of these are general, some of these are medical or food or creative type jobs.

  • There's a couple overlapping type jobs, so we're just going to try to stick with those

  • categories to help you remember them.

  • Let's start with some general job descriptors.

  • I'm the director of the marketing team.

  • I'm the director of the design team, to be the director, or you could say, "I'm the manager.

  • I'm the manager of the sales department.

  • I'm the owner of a local restaurant."

  • Or you can make this complete sentence and say, "I run the local restaurant."

  • That means that you're in charge.

  • I run the local restaurant.

  • I run my own business.

  • I run a jewelry business.

  • I run some kind of business because I'm the owner.

  • The next category deals with jobs that include words of some sorts.

  • The first one is teacher.

  • I'm a teacher, or you could say, "I'm a kindergarten teacher.

  • I'm an elementary school teacher.

  • I'm a middle school teacher.

  • I'm a high school teacher."

  • You could be more specific.

  • I'm a math teacher.

  • I'm an English teacher.

  • I'm a piano teacher.

  • I'm a music teacher.

  • Excellent.

  • I'm a professor at the local university.

  • I'm a professor at the local college.

  • This means that you are a teacher at the university or at the college.

  • We don't say teacher for this higher level of education.

  • We say professor.

  • You might also say, "I work in the school system."

  • This means that you generally have a job that deals with education, but you don't really

  • want to say specifically what you do.

  • You could just say, "I work in the school system.

  • I'm a student.

  • I'm a philosophy student.

  • I'm a student of biology.

  • I'm a biology student."

  • I'm a daycare worker.

  • I help little kids have fun all day.

  • I'm a daycare worker.

  • I'm a translator.

  • I'm a translator.

  • Do you notice how I added a D in the middle of this word?

  • That's because in American English, that T often changes to a D. So make sure that you

  • say that correctly, especially if you're a translator and you deal with words, translator.

  • Or you might be an interpreter, interpreter.

  • Do you notice that same thing happening at the end of this word?

  • It sounds like D-E-R, interpreter.

  • I'm a writer.

  • Again, we have that T in the middle of the word changing to a D. I'm a writer, or I'm

  • a journalist.

  • I work for the National Geographic.

  • This is a well-known company, so you might say, "I work for National Geographic," or

  • we could add "the" if you'd like.

  • I work for the National Geographic.

  • Excellent.

  • I'm a lawyer, lawyer.

  • Even though the root of this word is law, the vowel is different when we're talking

  • about the person loy, loy.

  • It sounds like it rhymes with boy, toy.

  • Lawyer, lawyer.

  • Or maybe you're a judge, a judge.

  • Like we mentioned before with the school system, you might say, "I work in the court system."

  • Maybe you're not a lawyer, you're not a judge, but you generally work in the court system.

  • This is excellent.

  • You can say, "I work in the court system."

  • I'm a tour guide, or I work in tourism.

  • You might not be the guide to yourself, but you could say, "I work in tourism."

  • If it's just a simple chit-chat with somebody else, they'll get the general idea that you

  • work with tourism instead of the specific job, giving all these details about what you

  • do.

  • I work in tourism.

  • The next category of jobs have to do with medical related jobs.

  • The first one is doctor.

  • I'm a doctor.

  • You might say, "I'm a heart doctor.

  • I'm an eye doctor.

  • I'm a bone doctor."

  • There are some technical terms related to each of these fields.

  • For example, you might say, "I'm an optician," instead of, "I'm an eye doctor."

  • But in daily conversation, we usually keep it simple and just say, "I'm a bone doctor.

  • I'm an eye doctor," something like this.

  • I'm a surgeon.

  • You might be a neurosurgeon.

  • You could add some more specific related words to this, but make sure that when you say the

  • word surgeon, surgeon, the end of that word is beautifully pronounced.

  • It's kind of swallowed surge.

  • Surgeon, surgeon.

  • Or if you're not a surgeon, but you have to go to the doctor, you might say, "Oh, I have

  • to see the surgeon today.

  • I'm worried about what he's going to say."

  • Make sure that you pronounce it correctly.

  • Surgeon.

  • I'm a nurse, or I'm a pediatrician.

  • This is a doctor who deals with kids.

  • You could combine these words and say, "I'm a pediatric nurse."

  • This is a nurse who works with children.

  • I'm a nurse.

  • I'm a pediatrician, or I'm a pediatric nurse.

  • A lot of these jobs, you can combine them to be more specific for your field so that

  • way you can expand your vocabulary even more.

  • I'm a dentist, dentist, or I'm a dental hygienist.

  • This is the person who checks your teeth and usually aids the dentist.

  • I'm a dentist, or I'm a dental hygienist.

  • Great.

  • I'm a pharmacist.

  • Break down this word with me.

  • I'm a pharmacist.

  • Or maybe I had to talk with the pharmacist today because I think they got my prescription

  • wrong.

  • I talked with the pharmacist.

  • If you help to work in the pharmaceutical field, you might be a pharmaceutical scientist.

  • Let's break down this word.

  • Pharma.

  • That's the first part.

  • Pharmaceutical.

  • Pharmaceutical scientist.

  • I'm a pharmaceutical scientist.

  • I'm a scientist.

  • This is quite general.

  • You couldn't make it more specific.

  • I'm a neuroscientist.