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  • - Hello, this is Jack from ToFluency.com.

  • Now in this lesson, you're going to learn

  • idioms and collocations related

  • to time.

  • So all of these collocations and idioms,

  • they use the word 'time',

  • and a lot of these are used

  • all the time in everyday English.

  • Now I talked about the importance

  • of learning collocations

  • in one of my recent videos

  • so be sure to watch that to get excited

  • about learning these collocations.

  • And then also go to my website

  • because I'm going to list all the examples

  • that we use in this video

  • so that you can learn them and internalize them.

  • So here are the collocations.

  • I'm going to give you a few examples, too.

  • Let's get started with number one.

  • The first one is 'it's time to',

  • or 'it's nearly time to'.

  • Now this means that we need to do something

  • or it's the right time to do something

  • at the moment.

  • The most common example of this

  • is simply 'it's time to go'.

  • Come on, it's time to go.

  • So you might be at a party

  • and your children don't want to leave

  • or your children are acting up a little bit,

  • which means they're behaving in a bad way,

  • and you say, "Come on, it's time to go."

  • The party is nearly finished.

  • It's time to go.

  • You can also say things like,

  • "It's time I started exercising."

  • Okay, it's time I started exercising.

  • Which means I need to start exercising

  • and I'm going to do that right now.

  • And you can also use it for advice

  • in a more direct way.

  • For example, it's time you stopped smoking.

  • Come on, it's time you stopped smoking.

  • Now the next one is quite similar

  • but it has a different meaning.

  • And this one is 'it's about time'.

  • And it's used with that intonation as well.

  • Here's an example.

  • How did the game go?

  • We won two-one.

  • It's about time.

  • You haven't won for ages!

  • So what you're saying here,

  • when you say it's about time,

  • is you're saying

  • it should have happened sooner.

  • Another example is this.

  • Guess what, we're getting married.

  • It's about time.

  • The next one is 'on time'.

  • To be on time.

  • Which means that you're not late.

  • Now I always try my best to be on time

  • for meetings or when I'm just simply meeting friends.

  • So I always try to be on time.

  • Now I might not always be there when you call

  • but I am always on time.

  • Here are two more examples.

  • Be sure that you're on time for that interview.

  • So be sure you're on time for that interview.

  • And the next one.

  • Trains in the UK are hardly ever on time.

  • Another one that's similar is 'right on time'.

  • So this means to be on time but just.

  • An example is, I was rushing to that interview

  • but I got there right on time.

  • Another one is, I think we'll be there

  • right on time.

  • Don't panic.

  • I think we'll be there right on time.

  • The next one is 'to take time',

  • or 'to take your time'.

  • And this means don't rush.

  • There's no need to rush.

  • Take your time.

  • I often say writing is a great skill

  • to practice your output

  • because you can take your time.

  • There's no need to rush.

  • But when you are having a conversation with someone,

  • you need to be able to react and speak

  • to that person straight away.

  • So when leaving comments below

  • take your time to ensure

  • that you get your sentences correct.

  • Now one that is similar

  • but it means something different

  • is 'take time off'.

  • To take time off.

  • And this means to not go to work.

  • So I can say, for example,

  • I'm gonna take a little bit of time off

  • next week so don't expect me

  • to reply to the email straight away.

  • Okay.

  • I'm gonna take a little bit of time off work next week.

  • Or you can say to somebody,

  • I think you need to take a little bit of time off

  • because you seem very stressed at the moment.

  • I think you need to take a little bit of time off.

  • The next one is 'to make time for',

  • and this means to dedicate time

  • to someone or something.

  • For example, that new project

  • is taking over everything right now.

  • You need to make a little bit of time for me as well.

  • You need to make a little bit of time for me as well.

  • Or I need to make some time for studying this week.

  • I need to make some time for studying this week.

  • Maybe I'll take some time off work on Friday.

  • The next one is 'free time' or 'spare time'.

  • And this is the time you have

  • outside of work or school.

  • So the time you have to dedicate

  • to hobbies or interests.

  • A question you probably learned

  • in your first ever English lesson is,

  • what do you like to do in your free time?

  • What do you like to do in your free time?

  • In fact, answer that below.

  • So leave a comment, tell me

  • what you like to do in your free time,

  • and take your time with this.

  • There's no need to rush.

  • Another example is,

  • I don't have a lot of spare time at the moment,

  • that's why I'm not exercising enough.

  • I don't have a lot of spare time at the moment.

  • The next one is 'to have time'

  • and many English learners use this

  • because they say I don't have enough time

  • to study right now.

  • I don't have enough time to study.

  • Or I don't have enough time

  • to get speaking practice.

  • So we use 'have time' when we're talking

  • about dedicating time to a specific thing.

  • Another example is, I don't have a lot of time

  • this week but I have lots of time next week

  • so I'll be able to help you then.

  • This next one is used all the time,

  • 'have a good or great time'.

  • Have a good time!

  • Have a great time!

  • This simply means to enjoy yourself,

  • to make the most out of what you're going to do

  • with your time.

  • For example, I'm just setting off

  • for a wedding right now

  • and can we meet up next week?

  • Yeah sure, have a great time!

  • Another example is, have a great time tonight.

  • I hope you have fun.

  • Have a great time tonight.

  • The next one is 'to save time',

  • and this means to be more efficient

  • with what you do.

  • For example, a boss might say,

  • "Let's cut down on meetings

  • "to save some time."

  • So the meetings aren't necessary,

  • let's cut down on them,

  • which means let's reduce them,

  • to save time.

  • And in my life, my new robot vacuum cleaner

  • has saved me a lot of time

  • because I don't have to vacuum as much anymore.

  • So my new robot vacuum cleaner

  • has saved me a lot of time.

  • The opposite of 'save time' is 'to waste time',

  • and this means to spend your time

  • in an unproductive manner.

  • We all do it, we all waste time doing things.

  • For example, I waste a lot of time

  • watching stupid videos on YouTube.

  • Now some people say that playing computer games

  • is a waste of time.

  • Do you agree?

  • Do you think that playing computer games

  • is a waste of time?

  • Let me know in the comment section below.

  • The next one is really common

  • and it's 'to spend time'.

  • To spend time doing something.

  • And this just means what you do with your time.

  • Here's an example.

  • He spends a lot of time working out.

  • He spends a lot of time working out.

  • I spend too much time worrying about stupid things.

  • I spend too much time worrying about stupid things.

  • And here's a question.

  • How much time do you spend

  • listening to podcasts?

  • So how much time do you spend

  • listening to podcasts?

  • Every week.

  • Let's move on to some idioms now

  • and the first one is 'to buy time'.

  • So you can buy time.

  • And this simply means to delay something

  • because maybe you're in a bad situation.

  • Let's say you owe some money to somebody

  • and you can say to your partner,

  • "Let's try and buy some time."

  • So give a reason why you can't pay

  • that money back right now

  • so you have extra time to pay it back later.

  • So you can say, "We need to buy some time."

  • We need to buy some time.

  • The next one is 'to be in the right place

  • 'at the right time'.

  • And this is used a lot in sports.

  • I know this from football.

  • So strikers have to be in the right place

  • at the right time in order to score a goal.

  • But it could just mean anything in life as well.

  • So it's important to be in the right place

  • at the right time

  • and a lot of this comes down to luck.

  • The next one is 'time flies'.

  • Time flies when you are having fun.

  • Which means that time goes by quickly

  • when you are having a good time.

  • So time flies when you are having fun.

  • And the last one is 'time is money'.

  • Time is money.

  • This is a common idiom that people use

  • when we are talking about

  • how to spend your time and not wasting time.

  • So if someone says this to you

  • what they're saying is time is a valuable resource

  • and they don't want to waste it.

  • So time is money.

  • Okay, so those are the collocations

  • and idioms related to time.

  • Again, go to my website,

  • I'll leave a link in the description,

  • so that you can read all the examples

  • and to get some extra explanations as well.

  • And then if you haven't seen my video

  • on why you should learn collocations,

  • then go watch that now.

  • I'll leave the link to that on the screen

  • somewhere around here or here.

  • Now if you've found this video useful,

  • then please like and share it with your friends.

  • Okay, thank you for watching.

  • Speak to you soon.

  • Bye-bye!