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  • Hi, I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com.

  • Are you ready to answer and ask some of the most common questions in English and feel

  • confident while you do it?

  • Let's go.

  • What do you do?

  • If I asked you this question, would you freeze and think, "What am I doing?

  • I'm watching a video?"

  • Okay, no, the question, "What do you do?" is not asking what are you doing right now,

  • it is an extremely specific question that only has one correct answer.

  • If I asked you this, would your heart start to beat a little bit?

  • What do I do?

  • What do you do?

  • What do you do?

  • Well, never fear.

  • In today's lesson, you are going to master the question, "What do you do?" and also 50

  • of the most common questions in daily English conversation.

  • I know that this lesson might be a little bit overwhelming.

  • 50 questions.

  • So I have created for you a free PDF download with all of today's questions, all of the

  • sample answers.

  • And at the end of the PDF is my little challenge for you so that you can practice what you've

  • learned.

  • Make sure you click on the link below this video to download the free PDF worksheet for

  • today's lesson.

  • It is my gift to you.

  • Are you ready to get started?

  • Let's start with some greetings.

  • I'm going to say each question and answer two times.

  • The first time, I want you to listen.

  • The second time, I want you to speak out loud and say it with me.

  • Practice your speaking muscles and your pronunciation.

  • You will grow and gain confidence with this style.

  • Are you ready?

  • How's it going?

  • Pretty good, and you?

  • One more time.

  • Say it with me.

  • How's it going?

  • Pretty good, and you?

  • How you doing?

  • I'm good, how are you?

  • How you doing?

  • I'm good, how are you?

  • You doing okay?

  • I'm doing all right, how about you?

  • You doing okay?

  • I'm all right, how about you?

  • Notice that a lot of these questions send back the question by saying, "How about you?"

  • You're returning the question.

  • See this in the next one.

  • How you've been?

  • I've been doing well, how about you?

  • Great.

  • You don't need to repeat, "How you've been?" to the other person.

  • You can just say, "How about you?"

  • Let's practice it together.

  • How you've been?

  • I've been doing well, how about you?

  • What's been going on?

  • Not much, how about you?

  • Say it with me.

  • What's been going on?

  • Not much, how about you?

  • What's new?

  • Not a lot, what's new with you?

  • Say it with me.

  • What's new?

  • Not a lot, what's new with you?

  • Let's go on to some weather questions.

  • What's it like out there?

  • It's cloudy.

  • I think it might rain later.

  • Say it with me.

  • What's it like out there?

  • It's cloudy.

  • I think it might rain later.

  • Crazy weather we're having, huh?

  • Notice this question just ends with, "huh?" because you want the other person to hopefully

  • agree with you.

  • So what can you respond to this question with?

  • You might say, "Yeah, it's been so windy."

  • Let's say it together.

  • Crazy weather we're having, huh?

  • Yeah, it's been so windy.

  • Is it hot enough for you?

  • Almost.

  • This question is very sarcastic.

  • If the weather is extremely hot and you ask, "Is it hot enough for you?"

  • It's a little bit of a silly question, so you can reply to this with, "Almost.

  • It's not hot enough for me.

  • I want it to be hotter."

  • So you can say, "Almost," but you're really acknowledging it is so incredibly hot.

  • So try to say this with me.

  • Is it hot enough for you almost?

  • Almost.

  • Can you believe how hot it is?

  • So crazy.

  • I can't believe it.

  • Maybe it's February and it's extremely hot.

  • This is very strange.

  • That you could ask this question.

  • Say it with me.

  • Can you believe how hot it is?

  • So crazy.

  • I can't believe how hot it is.

  • I can't believe it.

  • Let's talk about some weekend questions.

  • If you would like to practice some weekend questions with me in a speaking conversation

  • format, you can watch this video up here I made, Speak With Me About Your Weekend Plans.

  • Let's review some of those questions.

  • What you've got going on this weekend?

  • I'm going to go have dinner and a movie.

  • Say it with me.

  • What you've got going on this weekend?

  • I'm going to go have dinner and a movie.

  • How about you?

  • Let's add that question to ask the other person.

  • Say it with me.

  • How about you?

  • You doing anything fun this weekend?

  • Yeah, my family's coming to visit.

  • How about you?

  • Great.

  • Can you say this with me?

  • You doing anything fun this weekend?

  • Yeah, my family's coming to visit.

  • How about you?

  • What time are you going to head over here?

  • I think I'll leave my house around 8:00.

  • Does that work for you?

  • This is a great question when someone is coming to your house or coming to the location where

  • you are and you want to know, "Hey, when are you going to be here?"

  • You can ask this question.

  • Say it with me.

  • What time are you going to head over here?

  • I think I'll leave my house around 8:00.

  • Does that work for you?

  • Where do you want to meet up?

  • Let's meet at the park at 7:00.

  • Does that work with you?

  • This is a great question to ask.

  • Say it with me.

  • Where do you want to meet up?

  • Let's meet at the park at 7:00.

  • Does that work with you?

  • You can also substitute when for where.

  • When do you want to meet up?

  • Where do you want to meet up?

  • Great, you're making plans to get together.

  • You want to grab dinner?

  • Sure.

  • Where do you want to go?

  • This is inviting someone to share a meal with you.

  • Ask it with me.

  • You want to grab dinner?

  • Sure.

  • Where do you want to go?

  • You want to do dinner?

  • Sure.

  • What's a good time for you?

  • To do dinner, this is a great way to form this question.

  • You're asking if they want to join you for a meal.

  • Another way to say that.

  • Say it with me.

  • You want to do dinner?

  • Sure.

  • What's a good time for you?

  • Next, let's talk about job questions.

  • Are you ready?

  • What do you do?

  • I'm a teacher.

  • I teach students online to speak confidently and clearly in English.

  • This was the question at the beginning of this lesson, "What do you do?"

  • It's just, "What's your job?"

  • But in daily conversation, we hardly ever ask directly, "What's your job?"

  • Instead, we ask, "What do you do?"

  • This happens in almost every bit of small talk.

  • Every time you meet someone for the first time, they'll ask you, "What do you do?"

  • And you can ask this question now, too.

  • So let me know in the comments, what do you do.

  • What's your day job?

  • I run my own business from home.

  • What about you?

  • A day job is something that you do to make money.

  • Maybe you're a farmer, but you don't make much money being a farmer, so your day job

  • is a video editor.

  • Okay, you have two jobs, but your day job is the one that sustains you financially.

  • Ask it with me.

  • What's your day job?

  • I have an online business at home.

  • Great.

  • What field are you in?

  • I'm in software engineering.

  • What about you?

  • This is a great question and a more general job question.

  • Ask it with me.

  • What field are you in?

  • I'm in software engineering.

  • What about you?

  • What's it like to work there?

  • I love it.

  • It's so challenging.

  • Every day there's something new.

  • Can you ask this question with me?

  • What's it like to work there?

  • I love it.

  • It's challenging and every day there's something new.

  • If you would like to grow your vocabulary and speak more confidently about your job,

  • don't miss this video, "How to Pronounce 100 jobs in English."

  • Next, let's talk about some common questions in the office.

  • You got a minute?

  • Sure.

  • What's up?

  • Great question for interrupting someone and asking them a question.

  • Ask it with me.

  • You got a minute?

  • Sure.

  • What's up?

  • What have you got for me?

  • Here's the report you asked for.

  • Great.

  • Say it with me.

  • What have you got for me?

  • Here's the report you asked for.

  • When you have a sec, can I ask you something?

  • Sure, I'll be free in just a minute.

  • This is great.

  • You're interrupting someone politely.

  • When you have a sec, can I ask you something?

  • Sure, I'll be free in just a minute.

  • Are we on the same page?

  • I want to make sure that we understand each other correctly.

  • This is great.

  • Understanding on the same page.

  • Are we on the same page?

  • I want to make sure that we're understanding each other correctly.

  • The next one is a silly one.

  • Working hard or hardly working?

  • This question is unfortunately very common in the workplace usually between coworkers.

  • Usually, a boss will not ask an employee this.

  • The first one, working hard means you're diligent.

  • You're doing a lot.

  • But what about the opposite?

  • Hardly working means that you're only doing a little bit of work.

  • Maybe if you look like you're relaxing at your desk, someone might say this, "Hey, working

  • hard or hardly working?"

  • Usually, you don't want to say the last one, hardly working, even if it's true.

  • So usually, you should say the first one, "Working hard.

  • Yeah."

  • Next, let's talk about some common small talk questions that you can use all the time.

  • Do you come here often?

  • I do, it's the best.

  • And you?

  • Say it with me.

  • Do you come here often?

  • I do, it's the best.

  • And you?

  • Do you live in this area?

  • No, I don't, I'm just visiting some friends.

  • How about you?