Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • (warm synth hum)

  • - Hello and welcome.

  • My name is Ed Niedermeyer.

  • I am the co-host of "The Autonocast."

  • and the communications director

  • for Partners for Automated Vehicle Education.

  • I'm thrilled to be here today

  • with two fascinating companies,

  • the leaders of two fascinating companies.

  • First up in Orlando, Florida, Austin Russell,

  • CEO and founder of Luminar.

  • Austin, how's it going?

  • - Hey, great to see you.

  • Thanks for having us too.

  • Yeah, I mean, here today

  • in our advanced manufacturing facility in Orlando,

  • the new building we just moved into here.

  • Exciting to have, you know,

  • the first Iris units roll off the pilot line here.

  • - Great, and we're also joined

  • by Ödgärd Andersson, CEO of Zenseact.

  • Ödgärd, welcome.

  • - Thank you, I'm down in our lab here in Gothenburg.

  • Apart from a little bit of a throat problem,

  • I'm doing quite well.

  • - Awesome, can we just start with you,

  • and just talk about just what is this announcement?

  • What are you announcing today?

  • - Yeah, so after, you know, eight, nine years

  • in Luminar's history, I think we've largely been known

  • for producing really, the highest performing, you know,

  • cost-effective Lidar for series production applications,

  • and progressing on that to a stage

  • of where we can see this commercialized.

  • But in parallel, you know, we've been working

  • through a number of different software developments as well.

  • And, you know, what we're here today,

  • as part of this announcement is in partnership

  • with Zenseact, we're launching this full stack solution

  • to be able to now enable, starting with a Volvo,

  • a holistic autonomous vehicle stack that

  • for the first time can actually make its way

  • into series production, into production vehicles.

  • And excited to be here and to get a chance

  • to converse with yourself and, you know, Ödgärd,

  • and the whole team at Zenseact,

  • they're certainly really strong leaders

  • within the broader industry.

  • To be able to have an opportunity to work with them

  • is fantastic, and really uniquely positioned,

  • but we, you know, can talk more about that.

  • Yep, Ödgärd, anything else there?

  • - Yeah, I mean, we're super excited about this partnership,

  • and we've known each other now for a few years.

  • And basically, we set out to find somebody

  • who could make the best Lidar that

  • we can put in all our cars.

  • We really believe this is like the next step of safety.

  • And bringing the partnership now to this new level,

  • I think we're really excited to have the full offering.

  • I think it's going to be greatly received

  • when we first deploy it in the Volvo,

  • but also of course, after that point,

  • expanding above and beyond just the Volvo cars.

  • - Yeah, Ödgärd, could you explain sort of what,

  • what is this product, right?

  • We hear a lot about sort of level four robo-taxis

  • that are operating in fleets.

  • We hear about driver assistance in privately owned vehicles.

  • Having actual autonomous drive capabilities

  • in a production vehicle that people can go out

  • and buy is incredible, but sort of, where will this be used?

  • What's sort of the domain,

  • and the sort of use case for this product?

  • - Yeah, I mean, what we develop is like the software,

  • one pilot, it covers everything from, I mean,

  • computer vision all the way through decision and control.

  • And basically, it's one solution that you can either use

  • as the driver's support in conditions

  • when the driver needs to be in charge,

  • but also developing towards a highway pilots,

  • which basically, unsupervised, can drive for you

  • when you're under certain conditions,

  • and in highway scenarios.

  • And of course, we won't be able to go

  • exactly everywhere from day one,

  • but we will start and then expand from that point.

  • Both in terms of geography,

  • but also in terms of conditions.

  • - So Austin, at OEM Partners,

  • it sounds like we'll be able to sort of

  • have a range of options of what to do

  • with this technology stack, right?

  • And Volvo's the first, but sort of,

  • can you talk a little more about sort of the range

  • of things that, you know, using a Lidar-based system

  • for these kinds of privately owned vehicle functions,

  • automation functions?

  • What all does that enable in terms of that user experience?

  • - In terms of the capabilities, at the end of the day,

  • as Ödgärd mentioned, it's all about safety,

  • it's all about autonomy, saving lives, saving time.

  • And it really just makes a huge difference

  • when you can have this hardware,

  • and software solution deeply integrated.

  • There's so many times where you see these

  • different components developed in a vacuum,

  • but if you can have something that's a holistic solution,

  • it really makes all the difference.

  • And there's no question this is what a lot of folks

  • in the larger industry have been trying to do.

  • I think the key distinction here is actually though,

  • starting with the hardware, you have a foundation,

  • you have something that works, that delivers,

  • that isn't just, you know, one day theoretically trying

  • to make the physics work to have a product

  • that meets a spec, but having a real product, you know,

  • in an auto grade system that already meets this spec,

  • that's being deployed into production vehicles,

  • and then powering that, and supercharging it

  • with this software, that makes the vehicles

  • be able to have substantially greater safety capabilities,

  • as well in parallel, enabling autonomy,

  • starting on highways.

  • And that constrained highway autonomy problem,

  • as Ödgärd mentioned, highway pilot, is key to being able

  • to have a solvable solution in the relative near term.

  • You know, it's gonna take a long time by the time,

  • as you mentioned, robo-taxis are gonna be deployed

  • everywhere throughout the broader industry.

  • That's a decade-plus type problem.

  • This is something that's being solved for the next,

  • just to the next couple of years.

  • I mean, this is a deployed, this is gonna be available

  • on vehicles that you can buy, starting with Volvo,

  • and expanding outward.

  • So that's the distinction.

  • - Yeah, and just to clarify, so, at the high end,

  • this is, we're looking at like SAE level three,

  • conditional autonomy, is that right or?

  • - I think, you know, we've,

  • and Ödgärd and I are generally aligned on this, you know?

  • We largely try and avoid using the SAE, you know,

  • terminology just because, you know, there's,

  • it's kinda funny, you can see almost like,

  • level inflation going on, you know?

  • In the industry at this point right now,

  • and confusion about what does level three really mean?

  • What does that?

  • At the end of the day, there's really two modes of driving.

  • One is driver in the loop,

  • the other is driver out of the loop.

  • And the whole point here from an autonomous perspective

  • is to develop driver out of the loop capability.

  • So this would be the first time that someone

  • has a real, truly autonomous car,

  • much less something that you can buy.

  • But at the same time, while everyone is gunning for,

  • you know, those types of applications,

  • the safety side and the assisted driving side

  • should not be overlooked,

  • and that's where we're building these, you know,

  • what we're calling proactive safety features,

  • you know, into the broader system

  • to be able to actually start preventing accidents,

  • preventing collisions, preventing deaths,

  • even when the human driver is in the loop.

  • So, that's the story.

  • - Absolutely, and as someone who works

  • in an automated vehicle education,

  • I really appreciate your simplifying it, you know,

  • I think the SAE levels are great for what they are,

  • but sometimes for consumers,

  • it's just important to break it down,

  • and make it a little more simple.

  • - Totally, and by the way, on that note,

  • technically speaking, the kinds of capabilities

  • from a safety standpoint that we're talking about

  • are like level zero, you know?

  • Like, it's kinda interesting, like that,

  • which gets no attention, you know?

  • Normally in the industry.

  • But like, even just advancing these basic

  • safety capabilities that, you know,

  • people still get into accidents all the time,

  • even with these advanced driver assistance systems.

  • They help incrementally,

  • but they don't prevent accidents altogether.

  • And that's what makes all the difference.

  • And then, you know, obviously it goes all the way

  • up to level four, but again, yeah,

  • glad we can simplify it and clarify it for everyone.

  • - Yeah, and Ödgärd, can you talk a little bit

  • about why, sort of, what Lidar changes

  • in terms of what you're able to do on your end,

  • and maybe even sort of what co-development

  • sort of work, you know, doing this work together

  • in this kind of tight partnership.

  • What does that enable in terms of the final product?

  • - Yeah, I mean, if I starts with the Lidar,

  • we're basically trying to solve a quite difficult problem,

  • and you want to have the absolute best eyes

  • and ears on the car in order to do that.

  • And since we're aiming for the highway scenario,

  • we need to drive quite fast,

  • and then you need to see quite far.

  • And Lidar really fundamentally,

  • and especially working with Luminar,

  • and the performance of the Luminar Lidar,

  • we're able to see 250 meters,

  • which is really what you need in order to make this happen.

  • - Yeah, absolutely.

  • - So that's really the basic idea

  • behind starting to work with Austin,

  • and the team in the first place.

  • - And does doing the development work together,

  • once you have that, that partnership, you know,

  • what does that allow in terms of, you know,

  • really being tightly integrated in the development process?

  • - I mean, for us, it's a lot,

  • of course, learning between the teams,

  • but it's also about getting speed in the development loop.

  • So basically, now we're deploying with Volvo

  • as the first customer, we have a really

  • speedy development loop, collecting data,

  • getting kind of improvements in,

  • redeveloping, recollecting data.

  • And that just is unbeatable

  • when you can get that machine to work quickly.

  • - Yeah, and that speed is especially important when,

  • you know, there's a big difference

  • I think a lot of people don't always understand,

  • between sort of, you know, being out in development,

  • which a lot of autonomous drive technology is,

  • and having sort of test vehicles,

  • versus having something that is really,

  • and Austin, you mentioned the term automotive grade, right?

  • And I think sometimes people don't fully,

  • a lot of people don't fully appreciate

  • sort of how dramatic the difference is

  • between something that is automotive grade qualified,

  • and can be sold to private consumers,

  • versus something that's out on the streets, you know,

  • with trained engineers behind the wheel, you know,

  • ready to take over if anything goes wrong.

  • Can you just talk a little bit

  • about that distinction and sort of, you know,

  • what sets these two things apart?

  • - Yeah, I mean, we have, of course,

  • fundamental experience from our heritage within Volvo,

  • working with the active safety systems and deploying them.

  • And it's everything from how you get the software

  • into the car, and make sure it's safe

  • for all kinds of production vehicles.