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  • The Chinese Telecom Giant Huawei

  • wants to dominate the international market.

  • And that's key to the Chinese Communist Party's plans.

  • Welcome back to China Uncensored.

  • I'm Chris Chappell.

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  • when we publish a new episode.

  • Huawei.

  • It's the largest telecom equipment maker in China

  • and the entire world.

  • How did this Chinese company become

  • a global force in just a few short decades?

  • Well, it was more than just their entrepreneurial spirit.

  • It was largely thanks to the company's close relationship

  • with the Chinese Communist Party.

  • Which explains why Huawei's phones redistribute

  • all of your data to the Chinese regime.

  • Huawei's relationship with the Chinese Communist Party

  • is something the US government has been worried about for years.

  • But it's become international news

  • following the arrest of Huawei's CFO

  • Meng Wanzhou in Canada last December.

  • The US has filed criminal charges against Meng and Huawei

  • for various forms of fraud and violating US sanctions on Iran.

  • Now, the US wants to extradite Meng.

  • Despite that,

  • Huawei is still a critical part of

  • the Chinese Communist Party's plan

  • to become a world superpower.

  • And the Chinese regime has pushed Huawei

  • onto unsuspecting countries

  • through its Belt and Road Initiative,

  • also known as One Belt, One Road.

  • Which is much better than the original name,

  • One Loan, One Debt Trap.

  • Since the Belt and Road Initiative began in 2013,

  • the Chinese regime has financed infrastructure projects

  • in more than 60 countries.

  • And while it might be hard to see Huawei's role in say,

  • building a bridge in Kenya

  • that may or may not collapse,

  • the telecom equipment maker is the digital bridge builder

  • of the Belt and Road.

  • In a March 2015 directive about the goals for the Belt and Road,

  • Chinese authorities said

  • Two key objectives were the 'construction

  • of transnational fiber optics for communications'

  • and 'synchronizing technological standards

  • between China and other countries.'”

  • And that's where Huawei comes in.

  • According to one Huawei official speaking to Chinese media,

  • different [One Belt One Road] infrastructure projects...

  • would all require modern telecom equipment

  • to allow systems to communicate with each other

  • prime business opportunities for Huawei.”

  • Huawei also received huge loans

  • from the state-owned Silk Road investment fund,

  • and the  Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank,

  • which is backed by the Chinese regime.

  • Here are 5 ways Huawei is being used

  • for the Belt and Road Initiative.

  • Number 5

  • Underwater Internet Cables

  • The Internet may not be a series of tubes,

  • but it is a series of cables

  • including thousands of miles of cables

  • that run underneath the oceans.

  • Which is part of the reason why the Atlanteans

  • are so mad at us surface-dwellers.

  • But really, the Atlanteans should direct their anger

  • at Huawei Marine.

  • It's a joint venture between Huawei,

  • and a U.K.-based submarine communications firm

  • Global Marine Systems.

  • They built 7 thousand miles of undersea cables.

  • They called it the PEACE Cable Project.

  • Which sounds super sketchy.

  • It's an underwater high-speed internet cable system

  • linking Pakistan, South Africa, Kenya,

  • Somalia, Djibouti, Egypt, and France.

  • They say it will be a new information expressway

  • for China, Europe and Africa.

  • Which is just what everyone wants.

  • Internet brought to you by the world's

  • worst abuser of internet freedom.

  • According to the Huawei Marine COO,

  • they were building enough underwater cable

  • to circle the entire Earth.

  • But they ran into a little undersea problem.

  • And I don't mean Cthulhu.

  • I'm talking about Australia.

  • In June, the Australian government agreed to fund

  • its own undersea internet cables for the Solomon Islands,

  • leapfrogging Huawei's plans to build their cables there.

  • According to Reuters,

  • that was done because if Huawei had built it instead,

  • itcould have compromised Australian internet security.”

  • Number 4

  • Smart Cities

  • You live in a dumb city.

  • No, I'm not insulting the place you live.

  • I'm just saying, it's not a “smart city.”

  • Similar to how a person's nervous system detects

  • and reacts to changes in its environment,

  • a Smart City using Huawei's Smart City solutions

  • can sense, process and deliver informed decisions

  • that improves the environment for its inhabitants.”

  • That may sound pretty good,

  • but remember that it's a company connected

  • to the world's largest authoritarian regime

  • that's saying it can sense, process and deliver

  • informed decisions that affect its inhabitants.

  • And according to a 2015 research paper

  • from China's State Information Center,

  • smart cities could help lead the Belt and Road Initiative.

  • The paper applauded Huawei...

  • for undertaking an important role

  • in building 'smart cities' in other countries.”

  • And what would a top feature of these smart cities

  • designed by a company with shady links

  • to the Chinese Communist Party be?

  • Why, better governance.

  • Brr, I'm shivering.

  • And it's not the polar vortex.

  • I think it's something to do with

  • how the Chinese Communist Party

  • uses that same technology in China

  • to harass and monitor its own population.

  • And the Belt and Road Initiative,

  • using Huawei technology,

  • is trying to export that model.

  • According to the Jamestown Foundation,

  • While the smart cities of the future could be

  • better, more efficient cities,

  • they could also provide authoritarian regimes

  • with previously undreamt of tools of surveillance and control.”

  • Why, let's take a look at one example of

  • a Huawei Belt and Road Smart City.

  • Astana, the capital of Kazakhstan.

  • It began its transformation into a smart city in 2016.

  • To start with,

  • that meant Huawei adding around

  • 10,000 surveillance cameras.

  • What a wonderful contribution to an authoritarian state.

  • In fact, Jamestown notes,

  • It is both interesting and suggestive that

  • the list of countries where Huawei's safe city solutions

  • were first deployed includes a number of authoritarian

  • and hybrid regimes with close ties to China,

  • among them Russia, Pakistan,

  • Venezuela, Laos, and Angola.”

  • And since that worked out so well for them,

  • Germany is now interested as well.

  • But don't worry.

  • There's no way Germany could ever

  • transform into an authoritarian state.

  • Number 3

  • Smart Energy

  • Can't have a smart city without smart energy.

  • That's why Huawei is now selling smart energy systems

  • to oil-producing countries and companies.

  • Which turns out are also usually authoritarian regimes.

  • Go figure.

  • Some of these contracts Huawei has

  • are official Belt and Road projects.

  • One of the major strategic goals of the Belt and Road initiative

  • is to funnel global oil supplies to China,

  • which struggles to keep up with growing energy needs.

  • But it's not just oil.

  • Shanghai Electric,

  • a subsidiary of China's state-owned construction company,

  • PowerChina,

  • is building a new solar power plant in Argentina.

  • According to the Huawei website,

  • It is the first successful project in Argentina

  • after the Belt and Road Initiative proposed by China.”

  • Andthe project adopts Huawei Smart [photovoltaic] solutions”,

  • which may include connecting Huawei technology to the power grid.

  • Wow, great idea.

  • Give the Chinese Communist Party easy access

  • to your nation's power supply.

  • Number 2

  • National Emergency Systems

  • Ecuador has hitched its trailer to the Belt and Road.

  • A big part of that was the ECU 911 national emergency system.

  • It was built by China's state-owned

  • China National Electronics Import and Export Corporation.

  • And they turned to Huawei

  • for their facial recognition surveillance cameras,

  • routers, wireless access points, network switches,

  • and wireless access controllers.

  • So basically, using the excuse of providing Ecuador

  • with a national emergency service,

  • China got to install an all seeing eye.

  • First of all, that's a cyber espionage threat.

  • But beyond that,

  • it risks exporting the Communist Party's authoritarianism

  • around the world.

  • Countries like [Ecuador] may have difficulties acquiring

  • sophisticated types of surveillance

  • of course they can buy it off the shelf,

  • but what China can give them is a whole system,

  • from physical centers to processing software.

  • And when they export those systems,

  • it's not just the physical aspect

  • but the political norms that come with them.”

  • So Chinese investment,

  • backed by state-owned enterprises and Huawei,

  • might come with a bit more than a lot of countries bargained for.

  • Number 1

  • 5G

  • 5G is the future of wireless communication.

  • And companies around the world

  • are trying to dominate the market.

  • According to the New York Times,

  • “A Huawei spokesman said it had been

  • working on 5G since 2009,

  • having spent $600 million on related research

  • already and committing $800 million more in 2018 alone.”

  • AndHuawei...owns about 10 percent of 5G essential patents.”

  • This could be a big win for Huawei.

  • It could pocket licensing fees from both government

  • and mobile service providers that use a Huawei 5G network.

  • This report by U.S.-based think tank

  • Center for Strategic and International Studies

  • shows that Huawei leads the world

  • in manufacturing a certain vital component of 5G service:

  • the radio access network or RAN.

  • RAN is what connects your mobile phone to the network.

  • If Huawei gained control of the world's 5G networks,

  • it means the Chinese Communist Party

  • could also get access.

  • And that would create mayhem and mass surveillance,

  • according to a retired US General.

  • However, Huawei's 5G ambitions may not be coming to fruition.

  • Countries around the world have begun

  • banning Huawei from working with their governments

  • and building their 5G networks.

  • For a rundown on that,

  • check out my recent episodes,

  • How 8 Countries Are Dealing with Huawei.

  • So what do you think of how Huawei

  • is getting in on China's Belt and Road Initiative?

  • Leave your comments below.

  • And before we go,

  • now is the time when I answer questions from you,

  • my loyal 50-cent army

  • fans of the show who support what we do

  • through the crowd funding website Patreon.

  • Zhou Rui asks, “With Xi Jinping's

  • consolidation of power mostly complete

  • is there even a small chance that he will invoke

  • his power to make China Democratic

  • or even Democratic with Chinese characteristics?”

  • What Xi Jinping ultimately will do is the million yuan question.

  • However, I don't want you to have the misconception

  • that Xi is an untouchable all-powerful leader.

  • There's still infighting going on within the Communist Party.

  • China is facing unprecedented economic and social challenges.