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  • Stanford University.

    史丹佛大學

  • >> BILL GATES: Congratulations, class of 2014! (Cheers).

    恭喜2014年的畢業生(歡呼聲)

  • Melinda and I are excited to be here. It would be a thrill for anyone to be invited to speak

    梅琳達和我很高興在這,不論是誰,受邀到史丹佛畢業典禮致詞

  • at a Stanford commencement, but it's especially gratifying for us.

    想必都十分令人興奮,但這對我們來說格外特別。

  • Stanford is rapidly becoming the favorite university for members of our family, and it's long been a favorite university

    史丹佛大學已成為我家族成員最喜愛的學校,而史丹佛長久以來也是

  • for Microsoft and our foundation. Our formula has been to get the smartest,

    微軟和基金會長久合作的學校。微軟的成功秘方是,

  • most creative people working on the most important problems.

    找最聰明、最有創意的人來解決最關鍵的問題

  • It turns out that a disproportionate number of those people are at Stanford. (Cheers).

    結果發現,不合比例的,有一大堆人都是史丹佛畢業 (歡呼)

  • Right now, we have more than 30 foundation research projects underway here.

    現在,我們有超過三十個基金會的研究計畫,在史丹佛進行

  • When we want to learn more about the immune system to help cure the worst diseases, we work with Stanford.

    當我們想了解免疫系統,來治療疾病時,我們和史丹佛合作

  • When we want to understand the changing landscape of higher education in the United States,

    當我們想知道美國受高等教育人口分布的變化

  • so that more low-income students get college degrees, we work with Stanford.

    讓更多低受入的學生能得到大學文憑時,也和史丹佛合作

  • This is where genius lives. There's a flexibility of mind here, an openness to change, an eagerness for what's new.

    這裡是天才聚集之處。史丹佛的學生腦袋靈活,接受改變,渴求新知

  • This is where people come to discover the future, and have fun doing it.

    你們在史丹佛找到未來,且一路上享受整個過程

  • >> MELINDA GATES: Now, some people call you all nerds and

    有些人說你們是書呆子

  • we hear that you claim that label with pride. (Cheers and Applause).

    且聽說你們很驕傲有這個綽號

  • >> BILL GATES: Well, so do we. (Cheers and Applause).

    這個嘛...我們也是

  • >> BILL GATES: My normal glasses really aren't that different.

    我平時戴的眼鏡其實也差不多

  • (Laughter). There are so many remarkable things going on here at this campus,

    (笑聲) 在史丹佛校園裡,總是有許多了不起的事情在進行著

  • but if Melinda and I had to put into one word what we love most about Stanford,

    但若要我們用一個字形容史丹佛最可愛之處

  • it's the optimism. There's an infectious feeling here that innovation

    不得不說,是「樂觀」。在史丹佛,幾乎人人都相信

  • can solve almost every problem. That's the belief that drove me in 1975 to

    「創新」可以解決一切問題。這也是我一貫秉持的想法,所以在1975年

  • leave a college in the suburbs of Boston and go on an endless leave of absence.

    我離開波士頓郊區的一所大學 (哈佛),展開輟學的人生

  • I believed that the magic of computers and software

    我相信電腦和軟體的魔法

  • would empower people everywhere and make the world much, much better.

    能造福世界各地的人,讓世界更美好

  • It's been 40 years since then, and 20 years since Melinda and I were married.

    那已經是40年前的事了,我跟梅琳達結婚至今也有20年之久

  • We are both more optimistic now than ever. But on our journey, our optimism evolved.

    我們現在都比以往任何一刻更加樂觀。但在這旅途上,我們的心態不斷改變

  • We would like to tell you what we learned and talk to you today about how your optimism and ours

    今天,我們想跟大家分享一路上我們的收穫

  • can do more for more people. When Paul Allen and I started Microsoft,

    以及「樂觀」如何讓你們為他人做更多。當我和保羅‧艾倫一起創立微軟時

  • we wanted to bring the power of computers and software to the people, and that was the kind of rhetoric we used.

    我們就是想把電腦和軟體的力量帶給其他人,這是我們的座右銘

  • One of the pioneering books in the field had a raised fist on the

    當時一本電腦相關的書,書的封面正是一隻手,手握拳頭

  • cover, and it was called "Computer Lib." At that time, only big businesses could buy computers.

    這本書叫《計算機解放》。當時,只有大企業買得起電腦

  • We wanted to offer the same power to regular people and democratize computing.

    我們想要讓一般大眾也能使用電腦,讓電腦普及化

  • By the 1990s, we saw how profoundly personal computers could empower people, but that success created a new dilemma.

    到了90年代,我們看到個人電腦帶來的影響力,但又遇到另一個難題

  • If rich kids got computers and poor kids didn't, then technology would make inequality worse.

    如果只有富有的孩子能擁有電腦,那麼這項科技就會讓不平等更嚴重

  • That ran counter to our core belief. Technology should benefit everyone.

    這可違背了我們的信念:科技應該造福每個人

  • So we worked to close the digital divide.

    所以我們努力縮短數位落差

  • I made it a priority at Microsoft, and Melinda and I made it an early priority at our Foundation.

    這成為微軟的首要目標,也是梅琳達和我在基金會早期的努力方向

  • Donating personal computers to public libraries to make sure that everyone had access.

    我們捐贈電腦到圖書館,確保每個人都有使用的機會

  • The digital divide was a focus of mine in 1997, when I took my first trip to South Africa.

    我在1997年去了趟南非,當時,數位落差也是我關心的重點

  • I went there on business so I spent most of my time in meetings in downtown Johannesburg.

    我因為公事到南非,因此大部分的時間都在約翰尼斯堡開會

  • I stayed in the home of one of the richest families in South Africa. It had only been

    我住在南非一戶非常有錢的家庭裡,那時

  • three years since the election of Nelson Mandela marked the end of apartheid.

    距曼德拉選上總統、廢除種族隔離政策不過三年

  • When I sat down for dinner with my hosts, they used a bell to call the butler.

    我和他們家一同坐在餐桌旁,他們用鈴鐺來叫管家

  • After dinner, the women and men separated and the men smoked cigars. I thought,

    晚餐後,男人和女人分開,男人抽著雪茄。我心想

  • good thing I read Jane Austen, or I wouldn't have known what was going on.

    幸好我有看過珍 奧斯丁的作品,不然我一定搞不懂發生什麼事

  • (Laughter). But the next day I went to Soweto,

    但隔天我去了索維托

  • the poor township southwest of Johannesburg, that had been the center of the anti-apartheid movement.

    是約翰尼斯堡西南邊的一個貧困城鎮,過去是反種族隔離政策抗爭的中心

  • It was a short distance from the city into the township, but the entry was sudden, jarring

    索維托離約翰尼斯堡只有一小段距離,但兩者極度不合諧

  • and harsh. I passed into a world completely unlike the one I came from.

    差異很大,和我來的地方有天壤之別

  • My visit to Soweto became an early lesson in how naive I was.

    我的索維托之旅就成了寶貴的一課,讓我知道我有多天真

  • Microsoft was donating computers and software to a community center there. The kind of thing we did in the United States.

    後來,微軟捐贈電腦和軟體到當地的社區中心,就像我們在美國做的一樣

  • But it became clear to me, very quickly, that this was not the United States.

    但很快我就清楚知道,這不是美國

  • I had seen statistics on poverty, but I had never really seen poverty.

    我看過關於貧窮的各種數據,但卻不曾親眼目睹

  • The people there lived in corrugated tin shacks with no electricity, no water, no toilets.

    那裏的人住在鐵皮屋,沒有水、電,更沒有廁所

  • Most people didn't wear shoes. They walked barefoot along the streets, except there were

    大部分的人沒穿鞋,就光腳走在街上,不過

  • no streets, just ruts in the mud. The community center had no consistent source of power

    那裏其實也沒有街道,只有泥巴小路。社區中心沒有穩定的電力

  • so they rigged up an extension cord that ran 200 feet from the center

    所以他們湊出一條200呎的延長線,從中心拉到外面一台

  • to a diesel generator outside. Looking at this setup, I knew the minute the reporters left, the

    柴油發電機。看到這景象,我知道一旦記者離開,這台發電機就會拿去

  • generator would get moved to a more urgent task. And the people who used the community

    用在更實際的功用上,使用社區中心的居民

  • center would go back to worrying about challenges that couldn't be solved by a personal computer.

    也會繼續擔心其他電腦無法解決的生活難題

  • When I gave my prepared remarks to the press, I said Soweto is a milestone.

    當我向媒體發表預先準備的演講時,我說,索維托是個里程碑

  • There are major decisions ahead about whether technology will leave the developing world behind.

    有人擔心,科技的發展會不會棄開發國家不顧

  • This is to close the gap. But as I read those words, I knew they weren't

    捐贈電腦到索維托就是想要縮短這樣的差距。但當我念稿時,我知道這些字句

  • super relevant. What I didn't say was, by the way, we're not focused on the fact that

    意義不大,我沒說出口的是:順帶一提,我們不管

  • half a million people on this continent are dying every year from malaria.

    每年非洲大陸有五十萬人死於瘧疾

  • But we are sure as hell going to bring you computers. Before I went to Soweto, I thought I understood

    但我們他媽的就是要送他們電腦。在我去索維托前,我以為

  • the world's problems but I was blind to many of the most important ones.

    我了解世界上的問題,但我其實對許多重要議題視而不見

  • I was so taken aback by what I saw that I had to ask myself, did I still believe that innovation could

    因為看的了索維多的真實情況,我信心受挫,不禁自問:我還相信創新

  • solve the world's toughest problems? I promised myself that before I came back to Africa,

    能解決世上最困難的問題嗎?我告訴自己,在下次回到非洲前

  • I would find out more about what keeps people poor.

    我要好好研究害人們貧窮的原因

  • Over the years, Melinda and I did learn more about the pressing needs of the poor.

    在接下來幾年,梅琳達和我真的有去了解窮人們迫切的需求

  • On a later trip to South Africa, I paid a visit to a hospital for patients with MDR-TB, multi-drug resistant tuberculosis

    後來我們又去了南非,我到一間醫院探望得了MDR-TB (多重抗藥性結核病) 的病患

  • a disease with a cure rate of under 50%. I remember that hospital as a place of despair.

    該病的治癒率不到50%。在我的記憶裡,那醫院是個絕望的地方

  • It was a giant open ward, with a sea of patients shuffling around in pajamas, wearing masks.

    一大間病房,充滿穿睡衣、戴口罩的病患

  • There was one floor just for children, including some babies lying in bed.

    有一層樓專門提供給小孩,也有躺在床上的嬰兒

  • They had a little school for kids who were well enough to learn,

    醫院裡有間學校,讓狀況好的小孩上學

  • but many of the children couldn't make it, and the hospital didn't

    但大多數孩狀況差,因此醫院不確定

  • seem to know whether it was worth it to keep the school open.

    到底還有沒有讓學校開下去的必要性

  • I talked to a patient there in her early 30s. She had been a worker at a TB hospital when

    我和一位30多歲的女病患閒聊,在她染病開始咳嗽前,在一家結核病醫院工作

  • she came down with a cough. She went to a doctor and he told her said she had drug-resistant TB.

    之後醫生告訴她她有抗藥性結核病

  • She was later diagnosed with AIDS. She wasn't going to live much longer,

    隨後她又被診斷出患有愛滋病,她活不久了

  • but there were plenty of MDR patients waiting to take her bed when she vacated it.

    但已有許多病患等這在她走之後霸佔她的床位

  • This was hell with a waiting list. But seeing this hell didn't reduce my optimism.

    這真是地獄,但看到這情況並沒有減低我的樂觀態度

  • It channeled it. I got into the car as I left and I told the doctor we were working with

    反而引導出更多的樂觀。我坐進車裡,開離醫院,並告訴跟我合作的醫生:

  • I know MDR-TB is hard to cure, but we must do something for these people.

    我知道MDR-TB很難治癒,但為了這些人我們得做點什麼

  • And, in fact, this year, we are entering phase three with the new TB drug regime

    事實上,今年,我們進入 TB 藥物研發的第三期

  • for patients who respond, instead of a 50% cure rate after 18 months for $2,000,

    以前,病患需要花2000美金治療18個月,治癒率卻只有50%

  • we get an 80% cure rate after six months for under $100.

    現在,只要花100美金治療六個月,治癒率提高到80%

  • (Applause). Optimism is often dismissed as false hope.

    (掌聲) 樂觀常常被認為是不實的的期待

  • But there is also false hopelessness. That's the attitude that says we can't defeat poverty and disease.

    但其實也有所謂錯誤的絕望,那就是告訴我們,我們無法打敗貧窮和疾病

  • We absolutely can. >> MELINDA GATES: Bill called me that day after he visited the TB hospital

    事實上,我們當然可以。比爾在參觀完結核病醫院那天打給我

  • and normally if one of us is on an international trip,

    通常,如果我們其中一人在國外

  • we will go through our agenda for the day and who we met and where we have been.

    我們會讓對方知道每日的行程、遇見誰、去了哪裡

  • But this call was different. Bill said to me, Melinda, I have been somewhere that I have never been before.

    但這通電話特別不一樣,比爾告訴我:梅琳達,我去了我從來沒去過的地方

  • And then he choked up and he couldn't go on. And he finally just said,

    接著他哽咽,無法再說下去,最後他只說

  • I will tell you more when I get home. And I knew what he was going through because

    我到家後再跟你說更多。我知道他在經歷的過程

  • when you see people with so little hope, it breaks your heart.

    因為,當你看到一群人,握有如此微薄的希望,你會心碎

  • But if you want to do the most, you have to go see the worst, and I've had days like that too.

    但你若想做出最多貢獻,你勢必得先親眼看看最慘的狀況;我也曾經歷過這樣的過程

  • About ten years ago, I traveled with a group of friends to India. And on last day I was there,

    十年前,我和一群朋友去印度,在那的最後一天

  • I had a meeting with a group of prostitutes and I expected to talk to them about the risk of AIDS that they were facing,

    我和一群妓女聊聊,希望能告訴她們得愛滋病的風險

  • but what they wanted to talk to me about was stigma.

    但她們想告訴我的,卻是他人加諸在她們身上的污名

  • Many of these women had been abandoned by their husbands. That's why they even went into prostitution.

    不少婦女是被她們的丈夫遺棄,那正是當初她們踏進妓院的原因

  • They wanted to be able to feed their children.

    她們想靠自己的力量扶養小孩

  • They were so low in the eyes of society that they could be raped and robbed and beaten by anyone, even the

    在社會的眼中,她們地位之低,以至於任何人,甚至是警察,都可以強暴、毆打她們

  • police, and nobody cared. Talking to them about their lives was so moving to me,

    且沒人在乎。和她們談話讓我很感動

  • but what I remember most was how much they wanted to be touched. They wanted to

    但最讓我印象深刻的,是她們有多想要被觸碰

  • touch me and to be touched by them. It was if physical contact somehow proved their worth.

    她們想碰我,就好像透過肢體上的接觸才能證明她們的價值一樣

  • And so before I left, we linked arms hand in hand and did a photo together.

    所以在我離開前,我們手勾著手照了一張相

  • Later that same day, I spent some time in India in a home for the dying.

    離開妓院後,我去了一間垂死之家

  • I walked into a large hall and I saw rows and rows of cots and every cot was attended to except for one,

    我走進一個寬廣的大廳,看見一排排床,每張床都有人看顧,只有一張

  • that was far off in the corner. And so I decided to go over there. The patient who was in this

    在角落的床例外,我決定走過去看看。那位病患

  • room was a woman in her 30s. And I remember her eyes. She had these huge, brown, sorrowful eyes.

    是位三十多歲的女性,我記得她的眼睛,咖啡色、悲傷、深邃的大眼睛

  • She was emaciated and on the verge of death. Her intestines were not holding anything

    她非常虛弱,在死亡邊緣,她的腸子無法消化任何東西

  • and so the workers had put a pan under her bed, and cut a hole in the bottom of the bed

    所以那裏的人在她床下放了個鍋子,在床底割了洞

  • and everything in her was just pouring out into that pan.

    她身體內的所有東西就傾瀉到鍋子裡

  • And I could tell that she had AIDS. Both in the way she looked and the fact that she was off in this corner alone.

    從她的外表,還有她被單獨放在角落來看,我知道她得了愛滋病

  • The stigma of AIDS is vicious, especially for women.

    愛滋病的汙名化十分嚴重,特別是針對女性愛滋病患者

  • And the punishment is abandonment. When I arrived at her cot, I suddenly felt

    對病患的處罰就是遺棄。當我靠近她的床時,我突然感受到

  • completely and totally helpless. I had absolutely nothing I could offer this woman.

    完完全全的無助感,我沒有任何東西能給她

  • I knew I couldn't save her. But I didn't want her to be alone. So I knelt down with her and I put

    我知道我救不了她,但我不希望她孤單一人,因此我蹲下來

  • my hand out and she reached for my hand and grabbed it and she wouldn't let it go.

    伸出我的手,她緊緊抓住,不肯放開

  • And I didn't speak her language and I couldn't think of what I should say to her. And finally I just

    我不說她的語言,也想不到任何可以跟她說的話,最後我只說:

  • said to her, it's going to be okay. It's going to be okay. It's not your fault.

    一切都會沒事的,沒事的,這不是妳的錯

  • And after I had been with her for sometime,

    在她旁邊一段時間後

  • she started pointing to the roof top. She clearly wanted to go up and I realized

    她指向屋頂,顯然她想上去

  • the sun was going down and what she wanted to do was go up on the roof top and see the sunset.

    我發現太陽要下山了,她想到屋頂上看夕陽

  • So the workers in this home for the dying were very busy and I said to them,

    這間垂死之家裡的工作人員非常忙碌,我問他們

  • you know, can we take her up on the roof top? No. No. We have to pass out medicines.

    能不能帶她去屋頂,他們說:不行不行,我們必須分配這些藥物

  • So I waited that for that to happen and I asked another worker and they said, No no

    所以我等他完成工作,又問了另一個人,他一樣也說

  • no, we are too busy. We can't get her up there. And so finally I just scooped this woman up

    不行不行,我們太忙了,不能帶他上去。最後我抱起這位女性

  • in my arms. She was nothing more than skin over bones and I took her up on the roof top,

    她只剩下皮膚和骨頭,我帶她去屋頂

  • and I found one of those plastic chairs that blows over in a light breeze. I put her there,

    在屋頂上找到一張塑膠椅,在風中擺盪。我把她放在椅子上

  • sat her down, put a blanket over her legs

    讓她坐下來,在她腿上蓋了條毯子

  • and she sat there facing to the west, watching the sunset. The workers knew -- I made sure

    她就面朝西方,看著夕陽。底下的人知道

  • they knew that she was up there so that they would bring her down later that evening after

    我確保他們知道她在這,所以晚一點他們才能帶她下來

  • the sun went down and then I had to leave. But she never left me.

    我也必須離開了。但她卻從來沒離開我心中

  • I felt completely and totally inadequate in the face of this woman's death. But sometimes,

    在這垂死的女人面前,我感到無助、不足,但有時候

  • it's the people that you can't help that inspire you the most. I knew that those sex workers

    你幫不上的人,反而會帶給你最多啟發。我知道我早上遇到的

  • I had met in the morning could be the woman that I carried upstairs later that evening.

    六個性工作者,可能就是我傍晚抱上樓的垂死病患

  • Unless we found a way to defy the stigma that hung over their lives.

    除非我們找到方法,去除她們生命中的汙名

  • Over the past ten years, our Foundation has helped sex workers build support groups so

    在過去十年,我們的基金會幫助性工作者建立支持團體

  • they could empower one another to speak up and demand safe sex and that their clients

    讓她們能互相幫助,說出需求,並要求安全的性行為

  • use condoms. Their brave efforts have helped to keep HIV

    她們的客戶都應該戴保險套;她們的勇敢行為讓HIV 病毒沒在性工作者間流傳

  • prevalence low among sex workers and a lot of studies show that's the big reason why

    許多研究更顯示,這正是為何

  • the AIDS epidemic has not exploded in India. When these sex workers gathered together to

    愛滋病沒在印度大流行。當她們聚集在一起

  • help stop AIDS transmission, something unexpected and wonderful happened.

    幫助彼此阻擋愛滋病時,意想不到的事情發生了

  • The community they formed became a platform for everything. Police and others who raped and robbed them couldn't

    她們建立起來的組織成了一種平台,強暴她們的警察和其他人

  • get away with it anymore. The women set up systems to encourage savings for one another

    再也逃不過,她們更建立起有效的系統,鼓勵儲蓄

  • and with those savings, they were able to leave sex work.

    最後靠著這些儲蓄,她們得以離開性工作

  • This was all done by people that society considered the lowest of the low. Optimism, for me, is

    這一切都是由社會最底層的女性完成的,樂觀,對我來說

  • not a passive expectation that things are going to get better. For me, it's a conviction

    不是被動的期待事情會好轉,對我來說,是一種

  • and a belief that we can make things better.

    相信我們能讓事情好轉的信念

  • So no matter how much suffering we see, no matter how bad it is,

    所以不管我們看到多少苦難,情況有多糟

  • we can help people if we don't lose hope and if we don't look away. (Applause).

    我們依舊能幫助他人,只要我們不失去希望,也不視而不見 (掌聲)

  • >> BILL GATES: Melinda and I have described some devastating scenes, but we want to make

    梅琳達和我都像妳們形容了一些很慘的狀況,但為了告訴你們樂觀的力量

  • the strongest case we can for the power of optimism. Even in dire situations,

    我們選擇了最嚴重的案例來分享。就算在最可怕的情況裡,

  • optimism fuels innovation and leads to new approaches that eliminate suffering.

    樂觀的態度都能促進創新的產生,進而發展出新的方法來解決苦難

  • But if you never really see the people that are suffering, your optimism can't help them.

    但你若沒親眼看過備受折磨的人,你的樂觀將無法派上用場

  • You will never change their world. And that brings me to what I see is a paradox.

    永遠無法改變他們的生活。在我看來,這其中有個矛盾

  • The modern world is an incredible source of innovation and Stanford stands at the center of that,

    現今的社會中融合了各種創新,而史丹佛位於創新的中心

  • creating new companies, new schools of thought, prize-winning professors,

    打造新的公司、發展新的學派、孕育出得獎的教授

  • inspired art and literature, miracle drugs, and amazing graduates.

    藝術和文學、奇蹟似的藥物、還有一群傑出的畢業生

  • Whether you are a scientist with a new discovery, or working in the trenches to understand the

    不管你是有新發現的科學家,還是努力研究最邊緣的人們的需求

  • needs of the most marginalized, you are advancing amazing breakthroughs in what human beings

    你都在努力,有所突破,幫助他人

  • can do for each other. At the same time, if you ask people across the United States

    寫下人類史上新的一頁,同時間,若你問問美國的人民

  • is the future going to be better than the past, most say no.

    未來會不會比過去更好?大部分的人會說,不會

  • My kids will be worse off than I am. They think innovation won't make the world better for them or their children.

    我的孩子更悲觀,他們覺得創新並不會讓他們或是他們的下一代過更好

  • So who is right? The people who say innovation will create new possibilities

    誰才是對的?是說創新會創造更多機會

  • and make the world better? Or the people who see a trend toward inequality and a decline

    讓世界更好的這一方?還是賭定未來會更加不平等、更少機會

  • in opportunity and don't think innovation will change that?

    有再多的創新也無法改變的這方?

  • The pessimists are wrong, in my view. But they are not crazy. If innovation is purely

    在我看來,悲觀者錯了,但他們並不瘋狂。如果創新只是

  • market driven, and we don't focus on the big inequities, then we could have amazing advances

    市場導向,且我們沒著重在不平等,那們很有可能

  • and inventions that leave the world even more divided. We won't improve

    新的發明只會讓世界更分歧。我們不會改善公立學校

  • public schools, we won't cure malaria, we won't end poverty. We won't develop the

    我們治不好瘧疾,也不會終止貧窮,更不會發展出

  • innovations poor farmers need to grow food in a changing climate.

    貧窮農夫需要的科技,來度過氣候變遷

  • If our optimism doesn't address the problems that affect so many of our fellow human beings,

    如果我們的樂觀並沒有拿來解決會影響許多人的問題

  • then our optimism needs more empathy. If empathy channels our optimism, we will see the poverty

    那麼我們需要更多同理心,如果,有了同理心的引導,我們就能看見貧窮

  • and the disease and the poor schools. We will answer with our innovations and we will surprise

    看見疾病、窮困的學校,我們將用創新來解決

  • the pessimists. Over the next generation, you, Stanford graduates,

    嚇悲觀者一大跳。在未來這個世代,你們,史丹佛的畢業生

  • will lead a new wave of innovation. Which problems will you decide to solve?

    將帶領新的一波創新。你們想解決哪些問題?

  • If your world is wide, you can create the future we all want. If your world is narrow, you may

    如果你的世界夠大,你可以打造我們樂見的未來。若你視野狹窄,你或許會

  • create the future the pessimists fear. I started learning in Soweto, that if

    打造出悲觀者害怕的世界。我從索維托學到

  • we are going to make our optimism matter to everyone, and empower people everywhere, we

    如果想讓我們的樂觀發揮極致,影響每個人

  • have to see the lives of those most in need. If we have optimism, without empathy,

    那麼我們就必須看看最需要幫助的人。如果我們只有樂觀,沒有同理心

  • then it doesn't matter how much we master the secrets of science. We are not really

    那麼多擅長科學其實不重要,因為我們不會解決真實的問題

  • solving problems. We are just working on puzzles. I think most of you have a broader world view

    只是試著解決謎題。我覺得你們大多數人都比我在你們這個年紀時

  • than I had at your age. You can do better at this than I did.

    有更寬廣的視野,你們一定能做的比我更好。

  • If you put your hearts and minds to it, you can surprise the pessimists. We are eager to see it.

    真心投入,一定能讓悲觀者刮目相看。我們都很期待看到你們的表現

  • (Applause). >> MELINDA GATES: So let your heart break.

    (掌聲) 所以打開你的心胸

  • It will change what you do with your optimism. On a trip to south Asia, I met a desperately

    這將會改變你用你的樂觀態度做什麼事。在去南亞的路上,我遇到一個非常窮的

  • poor Indian woman. She had two children and she begged me to take them home with me.

    印度婦女,他有兩個小孩,她求我帶他們回家

  • And when I begged her for her forgiveness she said, well then, please, just take one of them.

    當我拒絕,請求她的原諒時,她說:好吧,那拜託妳帶走其中一個

  • On another trip to south Los Angeles, I met

    在另一趟去南洛杉磯的路上

  • with a group of the students from a tough neighborhood. A young girl said to me,

    我遇到一群來自不太好的區的學生,一個年輕女孩對我說

  • do you ever feel like we are the kids' whose parents shirked their responsibilities and

    妳覺不覺得,我們的父母推卸責任

  • we are just the leftovers? These women broke my heart. And they still do.

    而我們就像廚餘一樣?這些女性讓我心碎,到現在依然如此

  • And the empathy intensifies if I admit to myself, that could be me.

    當我想到,那可能是我的遭遇時,我的同理心更強烈

  • When I talk with the mothers I meet during my travels, there's no difference between

    當我在旅途中和媽媽們聊天時,會發現,為了孩子,我們希望的東西相差不遠

  • what we want for our children. The only difference is our ability to provide it to our children.

    唯一的差別時,我們不是都有能力提供給孩子

  • So what  accounts for that difference? Bill and I talk about this with our own kids

    所以是什麼造成這樣的差異?比爾和我會在晚餐時

  • around the dinner table. Bill worked incredibly hard and he took risks and he made sacrifices for success.

    和我們的孩子討論,比爾工作非常辛苦,他也做出不少犧牲

  • But there's another essential ingredient of success, and that is luck.

    但除了努力外,想要成功還有另一個要素,那就是運氣

  • Absolute and total luck. When were you born? Who are your parents?

    絕對的幸運。你在哪出生?你的父母是誰?

  • Where did you grow up? None of us earn these things. These things were given to us.

    你在哪長大?我們沒有一個人能決定這些,只能接受

  • So when we strip away all of our luck and our privilege and we consider where we would be

    當我們把一切好運和優勢剝除後,想想我們可能會在哪

  • without them, it becomes someone much easier to see someone who is poor and say, that could

    就更容易看著貧窮的人說,那可能是我

  • be me. And that's empathy. Empathy tears down barriers and it opens up whole new frontiers

    這就是同理心。同理心拆掉各種界線,替樂觀開路

  • for optimism. So here is our appeal to you all. As you leave Stanford

    所以這就是我們想對各位說的,當你們離開史丹佛

  • take all your genius and your optimism and your empathy, and go change the world

    請帶著你們的聰明才智、樂觀、和同理心,去改變世界

  • in ways that will make millions of people optimistic.

    讓更多人轉為樂觀

  • You don't have