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  • [Narrator] About 43,000 international travelers

  • fly in to New York's John F. Kennedy Airport every day.

  • By passenger volume, it's the US's

  • largest international airport of entry.

  • And in just Terminal 4 alone,

  • that equates to almost 1,000 bags an hour.

  • And in those suitcases, there's a lot of stuff,

  • some of which isn't allowed into the country,

  • including 120 pounds of food per day.

  • So what happens to all those

  • confiscated items anyway?

  • If you flew in to JFK in the '90s,

  • getting something into the US was a lot easier.

  • But after 9/11, a conversation started

  • about how to protect the country

  • from dangerous foods, drugs, and people.

  • And US Customs and Border Protection,

  • as it's known today, was formed.

  • You'll generally see

  • two kinds of CBP officials at airports:

  • officers, like Steve,

  • and agriculture specialists, like Ginger.

  • Their job is to find, seize, and destroy

  • millions of items each year

  • that don't belong in the United States.

  • It's a big job, and sometimes it requires a sidekick,

  • a sidekick on four legs.

  • Steve Robinson: This is Canine Spike.

  • Look, Spike.

  • He is an 8-year-old Belgian Malinois.

  • I've been his only handler from day one.

  • He's trained in narcotics.

  • During the duration of our career,

  • probably seized over 400 different seizures.

  • [Narrator] CBP officials like Steve

  • identify high-risk individuals

  • trying to enter into the US,

  • as well as drugs and firearms.

  • And because these are such high stakes,

  • dogs like Spike are trained in a special way,

  • in what's called "passive response,"

  • meaning if they sniff out drugs,

  • they don't scratch, they don't bark,

  • and they don't make a scene.

  • They sit.

  • And if they're right, the dog gets rewarded.

  • Robinson: His reward is actually this toy right here.

  • So he likes to play, so.

  • Ain't that right?

  • You like to play! You like to play!

  • Yes you do! Yes you do!

  • Let me see it! Let me see it!

  • Here at the port, we've caught up to

  • 16 keys of ecstasy recently.

  • [Narrator] Narcotics are then seized

  • and sent to be incinerated.

  • The incinerator's location is kept a secret,

  • as a matter of national security.

  • Now, pretty much everyone knows

  • that narcotics aren't allowed

  • through US borders,

  • but actually, drugs aren't the most commonly seized

  • item at JFK.

  • Food is.

  • When a regular traveler arrives in the US,

  • they're required to declare

  • any food items they're bringing in,

  • or face up to a $1,000 fine for the first offense.

  • These items aren't taken because agents want to

  • eat your yummy Spanish ham or Caribbean mangos.

  • It's because agents are responsible

  • for protecting American agriculture

  • from any foreign pests or diseases

  • that could affect our livestock or crops.

  • And that's where agricultural specialists

  • like Ginger come in.

  • Ginger Perrone: Everything gets destroyed

  • to protect against that pest risk.

  • We are protecting

  • the country's agricultural interests.

  • We're protecting against bioterrorism,

  • where someone could intentionally

  • try to bring in items

  • to wreak havoc in this country.

  • [Narrator] Foreign bugs hitchhiking in luggage

  • have wreaked havoc in the US before.

  • Florida's orange and grapefruit growers

  • lost $2.9 billion from 2007 to 2014

  • thanks to the Asian citrus psyllid.

  • And since being introduced into the US in the '90s,

  • the Asian longhorned beetle

  • has ravaged hardwood trees.

  • Eradication efforts between 1997 and 2010

  • cost more than $373 million.

  • James Armstrong: In our country,

  • we go into the grocery store

  • and the food is always there.

  • We don't have to look at it for holes

  • or check if it's got some disease on it.

  • It always looks great, so we get kind of spoiled,

  • and we don't really understand

  • the importance of protecting that.

  • [Narrator] So it's crucial that even a single

  • stowaway orange is found and confiscated.

  • But with 34 million annual international passengers

  • to and from JFK, going through each of those bags

  • can seem pretty impossible.

  • For humans, that is.

  • Luckily, they've got a little help

  • from the Beagle Brigade.

  • This four-legged officer is Biscuit,

  • and like Spike, Biscuit is trained in passive response.

  • But Biscuit's trained to sniff out food rather than drugs.

  • Sal DiSpigna: They actually learn.

  • They start out with five target odors,

  • and then over the years he'll expand,

  • and they retire with sometimes, like,

  • 150 odors that they know.

  • [Narrator] And Biscuit's pretty good at sniffing.

  • These beagles have an

  • estimated 90

  • Armstrong: Watching your dog sit on three grapes

  • in a Samsonite hardside suitcase

  • is just incredible.

  • Scientists say

  • their nose is 1,000 times stronger than ours.

  • And they prove it every single day.

  • [Narrator] Once Biscuit sniffs out an item,

  • the passenger in question and their bags go to Ginger,

  • who will X-ray and search the luggage.

  • Perrone: OK, these are both your bags, correct?

  • OK, did you pack everything yourselves?

  • You packed your bags yourself?

  • OK.

  • [Narrator] Ginger unzips the bag

  • and searches each one by hand.

  • And if she finds something that's not allowed,

  • it's seized and held in temporary bins.

  • Perrone: This is very common from that region.

  • Once you open it all up, you have grape leaves.

  • These are horse-meat sausages.

  • This is another very good example

  • of what we get very frequently,

  • especially in the springtime:

  • This is a plant that they're planning

  • on bringing here to grow.

  • So anything for propagation

  • has additional entry requirements.

  • So this is two families' worth from one flight.

  • [Narrator] JFK disposes of the contraband food

  • in one of two ways:

  • the grinder, or the incinerator.

  • Ginger will bag up the seized items

  • and label them based on their final destination.

  • Perrone: So we're gonna go walk this bin,

  • nice and full from those two passengers,

  • down to our contraband room.

  • [Narrator] This is the room

  • where illicit food meets its end.

  • Perrone: This is our grinding machine.

  • This is what we'll generally use for fruits, vegetables,

  • that kind of commodities.

  • It is called the "Muffin Monster."

  • [Narrator] But before Ginger can

  • send a piece of fruit down the Muffin Monster,

  • she cuts it open, squishes it, and inspects it.

  • She's looking for evidence of diseases,

  • insertion points for insects, and exit points for larvae.

  • If she finds a little bug, like this one,

  • she neutralizes the pest risk

  • and sends it to the US Department of Agriculture

  • for further investigation.

  • Now it's back to the Muffin Monster:

  • 120 pounds of food are grinded up each day

  • from arriving international passengers.

  • Avocados, mangos, and citrus

  • are among the most common fruits

  • that end up in the grinder.

  • Perrone: We do get messy.

  • It's important to dispose of it properly.

  • I love to eat, as much as everybody else.

  • I am a big fan of food.

  • But I know the importance of making sure that

  • what we seized, because of established risks,

  • is disposed of properly

  • to prevent it from causing problems.

  • [Narrator] So the next time you've got an orange

  • tucked into your luggage,

  • declare it, and let experts like Ginger

  • decide if it's admissible.

  • And leave the serrano ham in Spain,

  • because Biscuit will find it.

[Narrator] About 43,000 international travelers

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如何在肯尼迪機場發現和銷燬非法物品? (How Illegal Items Are Found And Destroyed At JFK Airport)

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    Annie Huang 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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