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  • All right! Mic is on. Alisha is on.

  • I have questions. You have...

  • ...to listen to me!

  • Hi everybody, welcome back to Ask Alisha,

  • the weekly series where you ask me questions and I answer them. Maybe!

  • First question!

  • First question this week comes from Aiman.

  • Hi Aiman, you send lots of questions! Thanks!

  • Which one is correct?

  • I want rest, or "I want to take rest."

  • Uh, well, you can say "I want rest" to mean in general just...

  • you would like to do nothing.

  • To relax.

  • Um, grammatically, though, "I want to take a rest" is correct.

  • Or..."I want to rest."

  • Both of those are correct.

  • However, in American English, we don't usually say

  • I want to take a rest.

  • It's more common to say "I want to take a break."

  • I want to take a break, or "let's take a break," or

  • can we take a break?

  • Something like that is more common.

  • You can say "I want to take a rest," but again, in American English, "rest" is less common.

  • Next question!

  • From Gabriela.

  • Hi, Gabriela!

  • Uh, Hi Alisha, what is the difference between "use to" and "used to" in fast speech?

  • The difference in pronunciation.

  • Yeah.

  • Um, basically, when we're speaking quickly, or I suppose even not quickly, we tend to

  • pronounce "used to" as "use to."

  • The grammar doesn't change.

  • Uh, it's just the pronunciation changes because it's difficult to say "used

  • to" very quickly.

  • I used to, I used to is very difficult to say, so we just say "use to" instead.

  • I used to use a smartphone.

  • He used to play soccer.

  • We used to cook every day.

  • In each of these sentences, I contracted "used to" to "use to."

  • I think actually in most cases we probably do say "use to" instead of "used to"

  • because it's quite difficult to say.

  • Again, this shouldn't really cause any communication problems.

  • Used to and "use to" have the same meaning, just different pronunciation.

  • Next question!

  • From Sooin-teh?

  • Sooin-teh?

  • Hope I said that right.

  • Sooin-teh says, Hi Alisha, which word do you prefer using as an American?

  • America, the United States, the United States of America, the US, the USA, or The States?

  • I only started using "America" to refer to my country when I moved to Japan

  • because the people around me use the word "America" to refer to the country.

  • But I think before that, I said, uh, "the US."

  • I used "the US."

  • People would say, "where are you from?"

  • The US.

  • Why did I use "the US?" because it's short and easy to say "the US."

  • I don't want to say "the United States of America."

  • It sounds long to me.

  • Thanks for the question!

  • Next question comes from...

  • Gerson Silva.

  • Hi Gerson!

  • Hi again, Gerson.

  • Gerson asks, uh, what does the American idiom "plead the 5th" mean?

  • Plead the 5th.

  • In a sentence like "I plead the 5th" it means "I choose not to say anything."

  • I choose to have no comment.

  • I don't want to say anything.

  • This idiom comes from the US constitution.

  • The Fifth Amendment.

  • So "amendment" is a word that means "addition."

  • So like, um, some new information was added to our country's rules; our country's laws.

  • Our constitution.

  • The 5th Amendment--the 5th addition to the constitution--gives people in the US the right

  • to remain silent.

  • So in other words, if we are being investigated... maybe police or law officials have questions

  • for us.

  • We have the right not to make a comment because maybe

  • we'll say something that will get us in trouble, even if we don't mean to.

  • Maybe we just say something incorrectly.

  • We don't know.

  • So, uh, "to plead the 5th..." so, the 5th amendment.

  • We use the word "plead" also.

  • Plead is a way of saying "ask for."

  • I plead the 5th means "I ask for the right to remain silent."

  • Meaning "I'm going to choose not to make any comment."

  • I'm going to choose not to say anything.

  • It's my right.

  • So, uh, in most cases when we say "I plead the 5th" it's kind of in a casual situation,

  • like there's just maybe something we don't want

  • to comment about or some people use it as a joke, or maybe there's some secret you need

  • to hide.

  • Whatever.

  • But "plead the 5th" means "I choose not to make any comments."

  • So, "no comment," in other words.

  • Next question.

  • Next question comes from Max!

  • Max asks, which one is correct and why?

  • Uh, "the car keys," "the keys of car," "the car's keys."

  • If by "correct" you mean "the most natural," the answer is "the car keys."

  • The car keys.

  • Why is this one better than, uh, "the keys of car"?

  • Okay, the keys of car is grammatically incorrect.

  • The keys of the car, or we would say "the keys to the car."

  • We match keys to the object that they open (the object that they are kind of attached

  • to) with the preposition "to."

  • We could say "the keys to the car."

  • "The keys to the house."

  • "The keys to the safe."

  • Here, uh, you have "the keys of car," so 1) you're missing an article.

  • "The keys of the car."

  • Also, 2) the preposition used is incorrect.

  • They keys TO the car would be correct.

  • We could say that.

  • "Where are the keys to the car?"

  • That would be okay.

  • Uh, but "the keys of car" is incorrect.

  • The car's keys, while there's probably no communication problem, with "the car's keys,"

  • uh, "car's" you have in the possessive form.

  • So, the keys belonging to the car.

  • Uh, but that kind of gives the image that like, the car has the ability to possess something.

  • Has the ability to own something.

  • And it's a car.

  • It's an object.

  • So it's kind of a little strange to suggest that the car could own something.

  • It sounds a little bit silly.

  • So, "the car's keys" uh, doesn't sound right.

  • It's not something we would use.

  • Instead, we'll say "the car keys" in most cases.

  • Or we could say "the keys to the car."

  • But "the keys to the car" is longer than "the car keys," so

  • the car keys is the one that is most commonly used.

  • Hope that answers your question!

  • Next question!

  • From Aiman Chan.

  • Aiman!

  • Is this the same Aiman?

  • I dunno.

  • You have lots of questions, thanks.

  • Is there any difference if we use "yet" at the beginning or at the end of a sentence?

  • Uh, well, yeah, actually.

  • It depends on the sentence.

  • At the beginning of a sentence, or at the beginning of a clause, "yet" can have the

  • meaning of "but" or "although" or "however."

  • He left the house for school, yet he hadn't done his homework.

  • We chose the more expensive house, yet we had no money.

  • When we put "yet" at the end of a sentence, it often means an action that has not been

  • completed, but that we expect is going to be completed, or should be completed.

  • I haven't done my homework yet.

  • You haven't eaten lunch yet?

  • When we put "yet" at the end of that sentence, like I just did, that means something that

  • hasn't happened, but we expect to happen.

  • Uh, in the first set of examples, it's referring to like an--a "however."

  • A "but" sort of meaning.

  • So, depending on the positioning of the sentence, depending on the grammar of the sentence,

  • uh, the word "yet" can have different meanings.

  • So maybe I'll make a whiteboard video about this.

  • Actually, "yet" is quite an interesting word.

  • But I haven't made a video about it yet.

  • So maybe I will!

  • Thanks for the question.

  • Next question!

  • Comes from James Kim.

  • Hi, James!

  • James Kim asks, um, how can I distinguish between "in which" and "at which"?

  • Think about the meanings of the prepositions "in" and "at."