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  • we start with the latest evidence of the economic damage across the UK caused by the effects off the pandemic.

  • In the past two days alone, some 12,000 job losses have been announced, most of them in high street retail and aviation, two of the sectors hardest hit by the locked up.

  • Trade unions have accused ministers off sitting on the sidelines, but Boris Johnson says that while the risk jobs is very, very serious, that Treasury has protected the livelihoods off 11 million people.

  • Now SSP, which owns the food chains up a Creston Cafe Rita TSA says it could cut 5000 jobs because of the sharp fall in passenger numbers at railway stations and airports.

  • The aerospace giant Airbus says it wants to cut 1700 jobs in the UK as part of plans to close 15,000 posts globally on the consultancy company.

  • Action to has announced this evening that it will be making up to 900 job cuts in the UK on the retailer.

  • John Lewis said today that some of its doors would not be reopening on top shop Harrods on the shirtmaker T.

  • M.

  • Lewin also announced job losses.

  • Our business editor Simon Jack has more details.

  • Airlines manufacturers retail The damage is deep and wide and seems to be getting worse by the day or even by the hour.

  • The announcements of job losses are coming thick and fast at the Airbus factory and broaden their was a somber mood.

  • Is people digested yesterday's announcement that 1700 UK jobs will be going?

  • It's a great shame to a lot of people.

  • I've got family members live here, so everybody, everyone is going to be impacted.

  • But there is a big part of community.

  • It's obviously in the name of the main source.

  • The jobs are on there, so obviously it goes.

  • It'll take a big impact on the community.

  • And that's why these painful decisions.

  • The chairman of Airbus UK said its customers were facing a crisis that would leave lasting damage.

  • An Airbus had to ensure its own survival.

  • Look into the sky.

  • I mean, this is the tourism industry.

  • Our bloodline are airlines, those are our customers on.

  • Do you know if they catch a cold, we're obviously in the same situation, so this is unprecedented and we want to be there for the recovery.

  • Eso we have to cut our cloth according to our means and it z tough we've got to do.

  • It's the right thing to do.

  • With fewer people getting on planes and trains.

  • Those stalwarts of airports and stations Upper Crust and Caffe Batarseh cut 5000 posts today in Parliament.

  • The leader of the opposition confronted the prime minister with a grim roll call that hours later is already out of date.

  • Airbus announced 1700 job losses.

  • EasyJet 1300 job losses.

  • T.

  • M.

  • Lewin on harvest, 800 job losses.

  • That's just yesterday, the prime minister defended the government response, pointing to a job retention scheme unprecedented in its scope and cost, but conceded some very tough times lay ahead.

  • We've supported huge sectors of the UK economy at a cost of £120 billion.

  • I'm not gonna give a figure for the number of job losses that may or may not take place.

  • But of course the risk is very, very serious.

  • Is he rightly, as he rightly says, a month from today, employers will have to start paying an increasing portion of that cost until a scheme is redrawn at the end of October 1 reason, perhaps, why job losses are picking up pace.

  • There's been a seismic economic shock to the global economy.

  • On these.

  • Job losses are like waves crashing now on UK shores with alarming severity and frequency.

  • The government spent tens of billions of pounds tryingto delay this inevitability.

  • But with this flood of new announcements, it's clear they're struggling to hold back the tide.

  • The government has already spent tens of billions on keeping dying businesses alive.

  • The chancellor's focus will now shift from trying to sustain jobs that may no longer exist to trying to great brand new ones.

  • Simon Jack, BBC News.

  • Let's be offered.

  • The job losses also affect those working in supply chains.

  • Often complex and well established as well as a range of supporting business is our business, correspondent Sara Corker reports from either side off the whales England border near the major Airbus facility at Broaden on the Welsh English border, Airbus provides highly skilled, well paid jobs in an area where they can be hard to come by.

  • This huge site makes wings for commercial aircraft that future orders have dried up.

  • Job losses here send a ripple effect through this community everyone able shop is with six jobs in the supply chain.

  • So realistically, when you look at a 1700 redundancies, that's an 80 10,000 jobs in the supply chain.

  • Hello, Never mind the local economy on the edge of the airfield.

  • This cafe is popular with our Bo staff.

  • The owner here, Sean has already had to make four of her employees redundant.

  • And how do you feel at the moment about everything that's going on?

  • Always worry in, obviously, myself.

  • I've got my husband's think about.

  • We've got a little long so we will lose an out.

  • So I think it s affected everybody, isn't it?

  • From planes to trains, nearly empty railway stations have left food outlets like up a crust in trouble.

  • 5000 jobs in our risk.

  • Passenger numbers remain at very low levels, 85% down on normal as many of us continue to work from home and SSP, the owner of a poor Chris says even by the autumn it expects to only have 20% of its stores open, and so it must take action now to protect the long term future of the business.

  • While on the High Street John Lewis is the latest retailer to warn some stalls will never reopen for smaller shops in Chester.

  • Today, there are difficult decisions ahead.

  • I think every town, every city, particularly in the North, will suffer.

  • Chester was already struggling.

  • I've just walked down here on day.

  • I've counted 14 to shop units on This is in the heart of the city, and the fear is there's worse to come when the furlough scheme ends.

  • James is an engineer now, at risk of redundancy on three months away from having a baby I was about to sign, for a mortgage is weak on new property, so its impact massively, really.

  • Everything's been put on hold so you could be out of a job in in the next week in every city in every sector, businesses and our cutting costs on jobs to try to survive this economic crisis.

  • Sarah Corker, BBC News in Chester School Life to Westminster and talk to Laura Ginsberg, our political editor.

  • Laura We heard the prime minister there, mentioning the kind of spending and schemes that have been put in place already.

  • What kind of scope does the government have to doom, or will you what they could do but won't do, even though it's happened in some other countries.

  • It does extend that furlough scheme, which no question has supported millions and millions of people with huge amounts of taxpayer's cash and government borrowing to try to prop up the economy through this extraordinary crisis.

  • But ministers are adamant that just can't go on for more than another few months, and it has to start being wound down because of the sheer cost on the sheer scale of it.

  • What they have already said they will do is we heard from the prime minister yesterday is speed up and accelerate the kind of big infrastructure projects that they want as a down payment to improve the country in the long term.

  • But even though they want to put the pedal down on the floor, there are questions about, really how quickly that can going, bearing in mind how much decisions about jobs are being made Now.

  • How much help is it, for example, to someone who worries about having a viable business for their cafe in Bristol, the promise of speeding up a road that me might might be built on Merseyside in six months time.

  • But we do know, though, is a week.

  • Today, the chancellor will be outlining what he hopes will suck up and prevent some of the pain.

  • Now, as I understand it, a couple of the measures on the table are perhaps giving a couple of £1000 to employers who create apprenticeships or a couple of £1000 to employers who create new jobs.

  • But there is really an open question, not just what will the size and shape and speed of the recovery from all of this looked like.

  • But can the government really come up with measures that are viable quick enough and effective enough to fear what many people in Westminster worry about happening?

  • That the hangover from the awful Corona virus health emergency is the kind of employment that we haven't seen for generations?

  • Laura.

we start with the latest evidence of the economic damage across the UK caused by the effects off the pandemic.

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英國政府被指 "袖手旁觀",數千人失業 - BBC News (Thousands of job losses as UK government accused of “sitting on sidelines” - BBC News)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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