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  • Hello, and welcome to today's Grammar Gameshow!

  • I'm your host, Will.

  • Could anything be more affirming?

  • And of course, let's not forget Leslie,

  • our all-knowing voice in the sky.

  • Good morning, everyone!

  • Today, we're going to be asking three questions about

  • Relative clauses!

  • That useful grammar that allows you to modify a noun!

  • OK! Let's see how our contestants are doing!

  • Good morning!

  • You spent Saturday and Sunday locked up in our studio

  • due to last episode's lockdown. Lucky you!

  • There's nothing quite like a lazy weekend, is there?

  • I feel so refreshed.

  • How was yours?

  • So cold

  • so hungry.

  • And contestant number two?

  • Please, I need a phone.

  • I haven't been home for days!

  • My family's going to be worried about me.

  • No, I'm afraid we block all mobile phone signals

  • in the studio

  • to prevent cheating.

  • Not to worry!

  • Nice to see you both again looking so well.

  • OK. Let's get going,

  • and don't forget you can play along at home too.

  • Question one.

  • We know that 'who', 'which', 'that' and 'whose'

  • can be used as relative pronouns.

  • However,

  • relative adverbs 'when' and 'where' can also be used

  • for talking about places and times.

  • They can always be replaced

  • by a preposition and 'which'.

  • Look at these sentences

  • and tell me how to replace 'when' or 'where'.

  • That was the day when I fell in love.

  • On which.

  • That was the day on which I fell in love.

  • Correct!

  • This is the place where I found the money.

  • At which.

  • This is the place at which I found the money.

  • Correct!

  • A bank is a place where you can withdraw money.

  • From which.

  • A bank is a place from which you can withdraw money.

  • Correct!

  • That was the time when the train departed.

  • At which.

  • That was the time at which the train departed.

  • Correct!

  • Leslie?

  • Excellent!

  • 'When' and 'where' are relative adverbs

  • that describe places or times,

  • and that can be used in the same way

  • as 'who', 'which', 'whose' and 'that'.

  • However,

  • 'when' and 'where' can always be replaced

  • by 'which' and a preposition.

  • The choice of preposition depends on the context,

  • so be careful!

  • Well done both of you!

  • Three points each.

  • On to question two.

  • We've just seen that sometimes

  • relative clauses have prepositions in them.

  • How does the position of the preposition

  • relate to the relative clause's formality?

  • The preposition can be in two positions

  • immediately before the relative clause

  • or at the end of the relative clause.

  • Leslie?

  • Well done!

  • The preposition can appear in two positions.

  • If it appears before the relative pronoun,

  • the sentence is more formal.

  • This is in a more written style.

  • If it is at the end of the relative clause,

  • the sentence is less formal.

  • This is more spoken.

  • Good job. Two points for you.

  • Let's have a quick-fire practice round, eh?

  • Look at these sentences

  • and tell me if they're formal or informal.

  • This is the hospital in which I was born.

  • Formal.

  • Correct!

  • There's the boy (who) I got the book from.

  • Informal.

  • Correct.

  • This is the medicine

  • (which) your friend can't live without.

  • Informal.

  • Correct!

  • She's the business person

  • from whom I learned everything.

  • Formal.

  • Correct!

  • And for a bonus point,

  • can you tell me why the last sentence was

  • even more formal?

  • Not only is the preposition before the relative pronoun,

  • but the speaker has used 'whom',

  • which is an object form of 'who' and is also formal.

  • Leslie?

  • Well done Kate!

  • 'Whom' is a relative pronoun used for people,

  • but only when they are the object of the relative clause!

  • It's quite formal and not spoken much,

  • but it looks nice in writing!

  • Well done Kate! 66 points for you.

  • It's time for our last question and then

  • you get to go home

  • one of you anyway.

  • Question three.

  • The last relative pronoun 'what'

  • can also be used in relative clauses,

  • but it is different.

  • Look at this sentence and tell me why.

  • A nice long holiday is what I need.

  • As a relative pronoun, 'what' means 'the thing which'.

  • A nice long holiday is the thing which I need.

  • Leslie?

  • Well done Levington.

  • 'What' can be used as a relative pronoun

  • to mean 'the thing which'.

  • But unlike other relative pronouns,

  • which need or refer to a noun,

  • 'what' is the noun and relative pronoun combined,

  • so be careful!

  • Good job Levington, have

  • a thousand points.

  • Well, that brings us to the end of today's

  • Grammar Gameshow.

  • Let's count out the points

  • accounting for last show's points

  • and the ones today

  • and a bit of

  • and carry the

  • And the winner is

  • Levington!

  • Well done!

  • Here's what you've won!

  • It's breakfast!

  • So tasty!

  • Food!

  • We'll see you next week,

  • where you can play for another prize.

  • And Kate,

  • you've been through quite an ordeal, eh?

  • Is there anything you want to say before

  • Can I please just call my family?

  • They must be worried sick.

  • There's no mobile phone service

  • in the studio, I'm afraid

  • ...to discourage cheating.

  • You understand.

  • Yes…I suppose

  • Call forth the lightning.

  • It looks like we'll need another contestant.

  • Thanks for joining us.

  • Say goodbye, Leslie.

  • Sayonara, Leslie!

  • See you next time!

Hello, and welcome to today's Grammar Gameshow!

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A2 初級

相對句2:文法遊戲節目第12集 (Relative Clauses 2: The Grammar Gameshow Episode 12)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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