Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • My name is Hanoch and I play.

  • I play with objects.

  • I've been making portraits with objects for a long, long time,

  • and the portraits are published in different magazines

  • all over the world,

  • and of course, in Israel as well.

  • Here is Mrs. Netanyahu, the wife of the Prime Minister

  • who happens to have a slight,

  • special way of dealing with cleaning.

  • (Laughter)

  • And here is President Peres.

  • So, I also play with my food. (Laughter)

  • So after having been doing this for so many years,

  • I want to share with you, what did I learn

  • of 20 years of playing with bananas.

  • (Laughter)

  • So, I learned that all artists play:

  • Picasso played with food,

  • (Laughter) Picasso played with objects,

  • because artists know that playfulness

  • is a fertile ground for creativity.

  • When Picasso made this head of a bull,

  • he wasn't using his amazing talent in drawing,

  • he was just using his ability to look at the world

  • in a playful way, in a different way.

  • And perhaps we can not learn to draw like Picasso,

  • but we can learn, perhaps, to look at the world

  • in a little bit different way

  • the way Picasso did when he created this sculpture.

  • So let's look at the definition of seeing:

  • I like what Paul Valery wrote,

  • "To see is to forget the name of what we are looking at."

  • What Valery is talking about, is forgetting a label.

  • To name something, is a direct path.

  • Once we understand it, we move on.

  • But what if we refrain from naming, we stay with it,

  • we explore it, we take the winding road, we wonder around?

  • We might then discover something new,

  • which we haven't seen before.

  • Maybe we will make some playful new association.

  • A good way to practice this, is to look for faces

  • I don't mean faces like this, I mean faces like that!

  • The world is filled with faces.

  • (Laughter)

  • This is the bathroom in my house.

  • And once we see faces, we are forgetting for a millisecond,

  • the name of that which we are looking at.

  • So, by now you can tell that I am a sucker for playfulness.

  • And it's true, and it is because

  • playfulness made a big change in my own life.

  • I was born and grew up in Uruguay, South America,

  • and I always drew.

  • This is my 4th grade teacher whom I drew.

  • It's probably the oldest caricature I have.

  • In Uruguay there are many cows, so I drew cows.

  • I even drew steaks, (Laughter)

  • and Gauchos on horses,

  • and when I was 11, we came to live in Israel

  • So the subject matter slightly changed.

  • (Laughter)

  • But not my passion — I wanted to be a caricaturist.

  • I looked at the newspapers, I copied what other people were doing.

  • But life has a way of happening to you,

  • so when I finally wanted to go and study,

  • I was already in my mid-20s

  • and my talent was kind of iffy.

  • I missed many hours of practice

  • because I'd been doing other things.

  • As a matter a fact, I was rejected from the Bezalel Art School, not far from here.

  • And I had to go and study in New York.

  • When I arrived in New York, (Laughter)

  • I realized that I did suck!

  • (Laughter)

  • Most of the people around me drew much better than me.

  • I was doing this kind of lame cartoons, while the real pros,

  • what I was seeing in the newspapers

  • were amazing pieces of art,

  • by wonderful artists like: Steve Brodner, like Philip Berk.

  • And that made me feel like this:

  • This is me, depressed in New York.

  • So, I was frustrated, I was pesimistic,

  • I had hit a wall.

  • Now, if you remember the diagram from before,

  • the direct path was not working for me anymore.

  • I had to take a different path — I had to start wandering around,

  • looking for other ways to find my own way of making caricatures.

  • And as we all know, when we get off the main road,

  • this is where some treasures might be.

  • And I did find some treasures.

  • The first treasure that I found

  • I found it in the picture collection of the Mid-Manhattan Library.

  • It was an old poster for the movie "The Great Dictator" by Charlie Chaplin.

  • And I don't know who the artist was

  • "designer unknown" it said,

  • but it was amazing to me, how the designer with so little said so much

  • both a portrait of Adolf Hilter and of Charlie Chaplin.

  • So, I needed to see this,

  • because that made me understand that it wasn't about technique

  • it was about communication, and it was about

  • finding your own way of doing things.

  • The second treasure that I found,

  • as I was drawing Saddam Hussein,

  • it was the first Gulf War, 1990,

  • and I was living at the time with a girlfriend who was a heavy smoker,

  • and there were matches all around the house.

  • And suddenly, I picked up those matches

  • and I put it on the face of Saddam Hussein,

  • and I made the mustache with it.

  • Now, I did it because I thought the form was the correct one,

  • but only later I realized that there was an idea

  • the matches where basically explaining

  • that this man had just started a war.

  • I wouldn't have found the poster or the matches

  • if everything would've been well with my road,

  • If I would've stayed in the direct road.

  • So, looking back twenty something years,

  • I know now that I was blessed by hardships.

  • By the way, Edward de Bono who coined the phrase "Lateral Thinking",

  • he calls the opposite of this,

  • to be "Blocked by Adequacy".

  • When everything is sort of adequate,

  • maybe not great, but not bad,

  • you don't have an urge to look for other solutions.

  • So in my case, being blessed by hardships made me look outside.

  • So I made a collage.

  • I started making collages,

  • and I realized that collage is the ultimate playful technique.

  • You can not make a collage on a direct path.

  • You need to wander around

  • to find something here, to find something there,

  • and when you put it all together, you create something new.

  • And I realized that this way of working, really, really suited me.

  • I felt very comfortable in this way of working.

  • It was really about trial and error

  • about trying things,

  • and about allowing myself to make mistakes.

  • Most of the objects that I try do not work,

  • but I need to go through like twenty or thirty

  • in order to find the right one.

  • Just as in the eyes of Einstein,

  • I used twenty gears until I found the really good ones.

  • So, it's really about forgiving yourself when you make mistakes.

  • And playfulness lets you do that. (Laughter)

  • When I made the portrait of Homer Simpson,

  • all the sketches that I made weren't working very well.

  • So I threw them to the garbage can.

  • And then I look at the garbage can in my studio,

  • and I realize that it was exactly the mouth of Homer Simpson!

  • (Laughter) (Applause)

  • Thank you.

  • So sometimes those happy accidents come to save you.

  • The happy accidents are always there,

  • and when we play, and when I make collages,

  • I notice them.

  • And sometimes is about helping them arrive.

  • So, sometimes it's about going out to look for something,

  • which I even don't know what it is.

  • When I made the portrait of Hafez al-Assad,

  • I went out in the flea market in Yaffo to look for some metal stuff,

  • and I came upon this object

  • And I said, "I don't know what this is, but I am sure Assad had one of those at home!"

  • (Laughter)

  • It just felt right.

  • When I make a collage, I only see what's in front of me.

  • It's very easy to forget all the preconceptions

  • about how one thing should be.

  • It's easy to challenge those preconceptions.

  • So for example, when I was making the portrait of Fidel Castro,

  • I realized that it just didn't need a face,

  • and it still looked like Fidel Castro.