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  • Good morning everybody. How are you doing today?

  • Who tweets? Good I expect to see your cell phones out.

  • Here's my hashtag. I am @cgreen and if there's something you don't like

  • or something that you want to make fun of our challenge or talk about later then start tweeting

  • and a promise to look at all of those later and we can have an ongoing conversation.

  • Is my e-mail if you like anything are don't like anything that I talk about today, feel free to reach out to me.

  • Here is what we will talk about today and will talk about open education resources and open access

  • and open science and a little bit about open data. Will get to all of that in a moment.

  • Of course all of the slides in the presentation will be under open license

  • and you will learn more about what that means which means you don't have to take notes and you can all have a copy.

  • Before I dive in, I first need to say a few think use.

  • First is that Ohio State has been a very important part of my life. This is my wife Leslie

  • and she went to veterinary school here. At the Masters and PhD in the school of communication

  • and we were actually married when we were in Ohio State work which eventually led to this happening.

  • And then that led to this. And Leslie and I did not have family and Ohio and the McCains, Tom and Jan, 2%.

  • Tom was my advisor and on the doctoral committee and the professor in the school of communication.

  • This by the way is the proper way to hold the new baby but this is not.

  • So our first assigned group at the McCains home and there was a lot of gardening and music and plenty of sweets.

  • I'm here today because of Dr. Tom McCain.

  • My job description at creative Commons is to ensure that everyone on the planet has access to a high-quality

  • affordable education. I wrote that because Tom told me that I have a responsibility as an educator.

  • You told me that my job was to help others learn and use the tools of our time to make sure that they Ted.,

  • That a phrase for his grad students and he called them young Turks

  • and he settled us with the responsibility to change the world for the better. And Tom is with us today.

  • Tom will you please stand up? There he is.

  • Thank you Tom. So here's what Tom taught me.

  • First, that everybody in the world has a right to an education and that an education is a good thing.

  • We are a all here at higher state not because we want to be multimillionaires but if you want to do that you work

  • somewhere else.

  • We work in higher education because we have a fundamental belief that education helps people's lives

  • and their families and it is good for society and liberal democracies and it helps people contribute and help them

  • and their families I have a better economic life.

  • We believe all these things fundamentally and all of your jobs that Ohio State are to help the faculty here

  • and the students leverage the tools of the day and the technologies of the day and the legal tools of the day

  • and the content of the day and the new pedagogy's to help everybody accomplish this team.

  • So before we jump into some of the open stuff,

  • I want to talk briefly about some of the global trends that we are seeing as we work in global comments.

  • One is that the demand for higher education is skyrocketing.

  • I will not read this and I want you to read this.

  • This by the way is the former chancellor of the open University in England.

  • Also the president and CEO of the Commonwealth of learning this new research I

  • and I ask you what you think the odds are that the world will build for major universities that serve 30,000 students

  • each to open every week for the next 15 years? Is that going to happen in the state of Ohio?

  • Probably not.

  • Certainly not going to happen in Washington state where I live I can say was a travel the world there are only two

  • or three countries making those kinds of investments.

  • India Brazil and China and they're not coming anywhere close to the growth rate.

  • So we are going to meet the global demand for higher education, we are going to have to have other systems that we use.

  • That will have to be online learning.

  • MOOCs are probably part of that work there are probably other ways for people to get in is if we don't think that way

  • than is literally today over 100 people were ready to go to higher education who don't have the opportunity to do so.

  • Second time the student that continues to rise

  • and then the higher education is falling see probably so these headlines of the past couple of years

  • and student debt cost $1 trillion in the United States that is more than all of the credit card debt and the entire US.

  • The average student debt coming out of a bachelors degree is now North of $27,000 a year.

  • So that's what your students are saddled with as they're coming up.

  • So people ask is college with that? Of course college is worth a. We know to get investment

  • and it's worth taking out that that the public is asking this question

  • and so does the question back to us of what can we do to make college more affordable.

  • We will talk about some of these ideas today.

  • The next big trend in this is probably the most important trend as it relates to open education resources is the

  • affordable of digital things. We know this every day and that is with something as digital we can start a for free

  • and distributed around the world for free and we can wait 1 billion or 2 billion copies of that thing for free.

  • We have been doing this for 10 or 15 years and education. Remember the days of Scantron sheets

  • and we made the rocks copies? We don't do any of that anymore.

  • Everything we build today is born digital. The video shoot the audio we capture the PowerPoint slides

  • and books we build everything is created digitally.

  • Because of cloud computing and because of mass storage and the falling price of computers can do things like this.

  • Here is just one example.

  • If you take it average textbook rather different things you can do with that but only to focus on the bottom number

  • and that's how much it cost to copy the text a computer. So how many students that Ohio State on this campus?

  • Tune of 50,000? Somebody would about the iPhone by 52,000x.0084 and then shouted out have the number.

  • Here is how much it costs to distribute. Yes it is expensive to put it in the mail

  • and she but that is not that expensive to put it over the Internet

  • So the question is, who has $37 in their pocket? We can buy every Ohio State student textbook tomorrow.

  • These are the economies of scale. So the question is when copying distribution

  • and storage of the core resources that we use that Ohio State University become free, what do we do with that?

  • To give you an example of how we have not been fundamentally disrupted yet in higher education,

  • let's look at other industries that have. Does anyone subscribe to any of these services? Of a lot of people.

  • This is a pretty good deal for about eight dollars a month I can get access to way more movies

  • and television that I could ever consume.

  • Does anyone subscribe to these music services? If you have not checked this out I do spot if I am the take $10 a month.

  • But now I spend $10 a month and I've access to 15 million songs.

  • I don't know about you but 15 million songs is enough for me.

  • Is only so much music I can listen to were flying to Seattle to Columbus. So here's the comparison.

  • For $20 a month you can kind of have access to all of the music on the planet plus anything that has ever come out of

  • Hollywood or television for 20 bucks a month or you can lease one textbook for your class.

  • And when you stop paying the 20 bucks a month for your textbook, what happens to access? It goes away.

  • You own nothing. You are leasing. So I ask you which industries have been properly disrupted by digital technologies? This is what we are talking about. So the fourth big trend, this is been going on for over a decade in this of the open educational resources.

  • So what happened is roughly 10 or 12 years ago,

  • educators around the world started to ask that if we are building stuff digitally, if we can store, distribute

  • or make copies of those digital things for near zero cost. Not quite zero base of the costs are.

  • So close to zero that we will call it zero.

  • What can we do with that?

  • So there was a big meeting in Cape Town called the Cape Town declaration. If you have not seen it look it up on the web.

  • The first paragraph is we are in the cusp of a global revolution in teaching and learning.

  • Educators worldwide it to building a vast pool of educational resources on the Internet, open and free for all to use.

  • These educators are creating a world where each and every person on earth can access

  • and contribute to the sum of all human knowledge.

  • This goes right to the term of open educational resources.

  • The United Nations is a set of human rights which appeared very basic things like the right not to get shot,

  • the right to have a basic shelter.

  • The right to have food so you are not starving to death. We're talking about basic level rights

  • and have added the right to education to that list. Why? It's a fairly recent ad by the way.

  • They're doing it because of the tools of the day.

  • The another we can share with everybody on the planet the marginal cars -- cost is zero but which is not doing it yet.

  • Then we had a big conference and debated what is called the Paris OER declaration.

  • 195 nations around the world find it including the United States and moving us toward open policies.

  • I talked about the technological tools. So we will have to living in the information age

  • and will more than happy to share course of anybody on the world

  • and we put it up online was that the other educators his the course in the files and take it and run with it

  • and very few people dead because at the bottom of the screen, what did it say?

  • All rights reserved copyright Ohio State University.

  • Anybody who knows anything about copyright knows that if they took the course and modified it

  • or translated it in a new language or changed it around permitted derivative or somehow change that work,

  • in fact they could be violating the copyright in Ohio could see them in the court of law

  • and they would lose so nobody touched her with a 10 foot pole that we did not know about credit, that the time

  • and was just getting started. By creative Commons is the solution to the problem.

  • So we are nonprofit organization would not try charge anything for our free copyright licenses

  • and we are 10 years old and we hang out around the world. We have teams in 75 countries including the United States.

  • So credit comments was started for this reason.

  • When you build something anywhere in the world the automatically have ownership to it and copyright.

  • That's a good thing. When you build something your rights should be protected.

  • This is true of the faculty at Ohio State is there building content as well.

  • Does anybody know how something gets in the public domain?

  • What has to happen first? You have to dive. It's an unfortunate set of events.

  • Then after you are dead what has to happen?

  • Not 60 but 70. And if you are Mexico you have to wait 100 years so now you are really dead work so the question is,

  • I have got this great course at Ohio State and I want to share it on Tuesday and 10 years ago Tom

  • and I said we are happy to share, but we don't know how

  • and we don't have access to expensive lawyers who can write custom licenses that we could share with people in

  • Australia or was someone in Bucharest. And we don't want to die first and wait 70 years. So there's nothing between.

  • Creative Commons is the him between thing. Rid of comments as keep your copyrighted don't give that to anybody. That's yours

  • and a roof you want to add an open license to it so that you are communicating with the rest of the world,

  • the rights and permissions that you want them to have, you can do that and have the best of both worlds.

  • You keep your ownership and share the terms and conditions that you want.

  • This attitude the conditions that all of our licenses require attribution which with that if they use my stuff the

  • have to give me credit. That if you change it then you have to share your changes forward with the world.

  • Is anyone heard of Wikipedia?

  • Will keep you use the attribution share alike license of every Wikipedia article.

  • So when you change an article in Wikipedia was thing yes I will show that forward. Noncommercial is with something .

  • You can use my work for free and modified but you cannot sell it and you cannot put online in charge $20.

  • No derivatives means you cannot change a.

  • So you have to leave my work as it is.

  • When you mention match those different conditions you get one of the six open copyright licenses.

  • When you lay those out like this,

  • when I say most free to least create -- let most free to least free I'm talking about not cost because there is no

  • cost but it is the degrees of freedom your communicating to other people in an education this is really important.

  • Because if we're going to share our course architect the core video, somebody else might want to change it.

  • So I will give an example later about that we built a big OER project in Washington state

  • and Brazil's community colleges are taking our works

  • and throwing out all of the silly examples of Northwest salmon and Verizon trees

  • and they're putting in Amazonian rain forest examples and it's not in English it's all in Portuguese.

  • And so the purpose of license under work,

  • other people can do that work so public domain is always in the most permissive

  • and is not even attribution required to have a tool that lets it works in the public domain.

  • But in education we try to step towards the top of the list.

  • But the by life in meaning that the other thing required is attribution. The next one down is shareable.

  • You get the idea.

  • I license are global and work in a retention the one which is cool because you can share something at Ohio State

  • and the belts around the world can pick it up.

  • So you saw some great examples of what Ohio State is doing to put resources online and make them free.

  • But don't call into the same trap that,

  • and I fell into 10 years ago we put up fences this is free but it's all right reserved copyright because nobody will

  • use it because more and more people around the world are educated about what that means

  • and they don't want to get sued. And if your intention is to share it,

  • put it open license on the work so that people can actually use it. So people actually use creative, licenses

  • and this is little project called Wikipedia and everything on Wikipedia is credit card once licenses.

  • So the any of your readers Flickr? I'm sure none of your faculty ever go on the web

  • and Grabow photo violate someone's copyright.

  • It does not happen here at Ohio State but I can tell you that it does happen at other universities.

  • What you might is work with faculty to take them to Flickr

  • and did a search but filter the search break creative Commons licensed images.

  • I did a call when I was here and is now over 305 million could've Commons licensed images up in Flickr.

  • Any scientists in the room? Any physics?

  • You know CERN. They're doing. The triggering how Adams work and smashing them together and this

  • and this is important information.

  • We this is video were going to put it under a crate of common license because it's happening in education

  • and music and journalism and broadcast.

  • It's happening in traditional publishing, both open access journals, but also textbook publishers.

  • This happen in the glamour sector like Valerie's, libraries, archives and make Iams -- museums.

  • Libraries are taking all of the metadata so here now here is Armenta catalog and every somebody build something that.

  • That is a huge project in Europe over there taking all of the digital images of their work and putting it online.

  • I was on the phone with the Smithsonian two weeks ago

  • and they said we have 30 years of stuff involves that were not the dialectic is not have enough museums space

  • and I said what you did on of high-resolution digital cameras and 3-D scanners

  • and put it all up on the web under an open license so the public that owns all of these resources can actually see

  • them get access to it and use it in the Ohio State our courses for example.

  • All of these are contributions in the White House under creative Commons and the list goes on and on.

  • So we are in higher Ed.

  • There are literally north of 650 universities website six 553 open courses that are up right now if you go to the open

  • courseware Consortium site and some universities like MIT have gone completely open.

  • Has anyone heard of MIT open courseware?

  • 10 years ago the MIT president stood up to the content is not a strategic advantage.

  • Content is infrastructure. It's really important than it has got to be great. But it is not what makes MIT great.

  • The reason people come to MIT or Ohio State or Stanford or take your pick that they come for the great faculty.

  • Become the programs. The student support services the career mentoring. The living in a community with other students.

  • The professional networks that develop. The did not come because of your statistics 101 content. MIT realize that

  • and hundreds of other universities have followed MIT's lead and are now opening up

  • and actually putting a crate of Commons license on the works so that one University can take a course or textbook

  • or something else from another university and legally reuse it and revise it and share it work

  • This is also happening in K-12 all around the world.

  • One of my favorite examples is our team in Poland that worked with the president's office because half the kids in

  • Poland did not have access to a textbook it may launch the OER project another do.

  • Because the whole country about $15 million and every kid now has a textbook.

  • So there are hundreds of projects around the world the window have time to go to all of them.

  • I am running a session this afternoon and we can talk more if you want.

  • I have been on this time open educational resources and this is the Hewlett term and its will to go through.

  • It's anything we use in any medium I have been talking about digital but open could be picked as well.

  • So we have teams in Africa over there is not high-speed bandwidth or collectivity to every village

  • and we move OER as paper. We put out DVDs across the country . Anything to get the information

  • and the knowledge up to the people were using it.

  • So doesn't matter the format that it is it's the license the gives people the right to use it.