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  • Let me see this thing.

  • MAN: Where in the world did you get these?

  • These are wonderful.

  • MAN: Yeah, that's really cool, actually.

  • Sweet.

  • MAN: This is an iconic piece of history.

  • It'll go down in history for hundreds of years.

  • MAN: Hey, how you doing?

  • MAN: Well, I brought in something I thought

  • maybe you'd be interested in.

  • What do you have?

  • I got a $30 bill made by the United States.

  • Let me see thing thing.

  • MAN: Absolutely.

  • MAN: This looks like a $20 bill to me.

  • MAN: It does.

  • MAN: And now it looks like a 10.

  • Now it looks like a $10 bill.

  • So this one's from 1974.

  • MAN: Those were the last ones made.

  • So what happened?

  • There was just an error on the printing press or something?

  • Yeah, exactly.

  • They printed the backs first and they let them dry overnight.

  • And then, instead of printing the front with a 10,

  • they accidentally slipped those in,

  • and they printed the front with a 20.

  • MAN: How much are you looking to get?

  • I guess I'm looking for $35,000 on this.

  • Oh, that's a lot of money for 30 bucks.

  • It is.

  • I'd like to call someone in and kind

  • of get their opinion on what it is

  • and what they think about it. - Sure.

  • Fair enough. Let's do it.

  • This bill is series 1974.

  • When they were discovered, I believe the Fed came in.

  • They heard about them and retrieved

  • as many as they could.

  • But around 2,000, I'd say, maybe 2,600, 2,700 escaped.

  • So how much do you think this is worth?

  • $30,000 and $40,000.

  • How about $27,500.

  • I think if I offer you $22,000,

  • I think there's enough room in there

  • for me to make the profit that I need to make.

  • I just can't go below $25,000.

  • All right.

  • - Thanks so much. - My pleasure.

  • - Thank you. - Thank you.

  • Well, I have some bills that I had in my safe deposit box

  • I'm looking at selling.

  • We have an 1875 $1 bill.

  • This one too.

  • This is an 1883 brown back 5.

  • It's got the brown back.

  • Where in the world did you get these?

  • WOMAN: My Aunt Margaret gave them to me.

  • And my Aunt Margaret was the granddaughter

  • of the treasurer of the United States back in the 1800s.

  • And was he allowed just to be handing out money or--

  • [LAUGHS]

  • Well, the interesting thing I noticed about this bill

  • is the serial number.

  • Look it, it's number one.

  • MAN: Yeah, that's really cool actually.

  • There is a few condition issues with these.

  • You see the holes in the face?

  • Yeah, I think I probably put it on my bulletin board

  • when I was younger.

  • That's hilarious if that's what you did.

  • So how much are you looking to get?

  • I'm looking for $29,000 for the $1 bill

  • and $16,000 for the $5 bill.

  • I'm going to have to call in somebody who knows

  • a little bit more than I do.

  • OK.

  • I got a--

  • it like a misprinted or a first-print brownback.

  • And this is serial number 1.

  • These are wonderful.

  • This is an iconic piece of history.

  • This is serial number 1.

  • This was the beginning years of the United States currency

  • as opposed to all of the banks issuing

  • their own separate currency.

  • MAN: What do you think they're worth?

  • The fact that this is serial number 1 is everything.

  • The bill with the number 1 serial number

  • is, in my opinion, worth $15,000 retail.

  • And the Ashland brownback is worth $5,000 retail.

  • You heard what my expert had to say.

  • And I'm comfortable offering $16,000.

  • $22,000?

  • MAN: No, I can't go that high.

  • So that's your final offer, $16,000 for both?

  • $16,500, yeah.

  • Yeah, I can't take that.

  • You want to sell just the $5 bill for $4,000?

  • I will take your offer, $4,000 for the $5 bill.

  • All right, cool.

  • I've got a $5 New Zealand note here signed by Ed Hillary.

  • Sweet.

  • As you probably know, Ed Hillary was

  • the first person to climb Mt.

  • Everest.

  • He's the only live person to actually

  • be put on a New Zealand note.

  • So how much do you want for it?

  • So I'd like $250.

  • I think it's a fair price.

  • Could I give you 2 and 1/4?

  • Could you split the difference?

  • $235?

  • Done.

  • OK, deal.

  • Perfect.

  • Check this out.

  • You have a piece of a $20 bill.

  • It is a piece of a $20 bill from the DB Cooper hijacking.

  • He jumped out of a 727 in November of 1971 with $200,000.

  • This is cool.

  • The only hijacking never solved.

  • It was 1971.

  • There was a plane flight.

  • He gave the stewardess a note saying he had a bomb.

  • He demanded a parachute and $200,000 in cash.

  • They landed, gave him what he wanted, took back off.

  • And he jumped out.

  • Exactly.

  • It's the only unsolved hijacking in world history.

  • No trace of DB Cooper has ever been found.

  • And he could be sitting on a beach someplace.

  • Nobody knows exactly what happened.

  • It'll go down in history for hundreds of years.

  • MAN: How much do you want?

  • I really want $2,000.

  • Some of the larger fragments go for way more money than that.

  • I'm thinking, like, 1,000 bucks.

  • $1,800 was going to be my lowest.

  • MAN: How about 1,500 bucks?

  • I'm really got to have $1,700.

  • MAN: Rick, go ahead and split it at $1,600.

  • MAN: $1,600 is a little low.

  • No, it's not.

  • That's what we can pay.

  • - All right. - All right.

  • You have a deal.

  • All right, I'll meet you right up front.

  • Thank you, much, sir.

  • OK, thank you.

Let me see this thing.

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典當明星:3張昂貴的稀有票據|歷史沿革 (Pawn Stars: 3 EXPENSIVE RARE BILLS | History)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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