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  • - [Instructor] Hello readers, I'm going to draw you

  • a map right now, and it's gonna look like

  • I've drawn a mountain.

  • But it's not a map of a mountain.

  • It's a map of a story.

  • What, your saying, how do you map a story?

  • What makes a story pointy?

  • These are great questions, and to answer them,

  • I'll say this, today we're going to talk about

  • the elements of a story,

  • or the parts that make it up,

  • like ingredients in a recipe.

  • Many stories follow a similar pattern.

  • Good readers know what these patterns are,

  • and can talk about them using the right terms.

  • And this helps everyone be on the same page,

  • so to speak, when you discuss or write

  • about the stories you read.

  • I'm about to drop a lot of vocabulary on you,

  • so brace yourselves.

  • The story begins with exposition,

  • where we learn about the characters and the setting.

  • Then, we introduce a conflict, or a big problem.

  • As the characters begin to interact with the conflict

  • or try to solve the problem,

  • we enter rising action.

  • This upward slope of the story mountain.

  • When the conflict comes to a head,

  • we hit the most exciting part of the story, the climax.

  • Here, the conflict can't go any further.

  • We're at the top of the mountain.

  • There's nowhere else to go, except down.

  • After the climax, after this most exciting

  • part of the story, we enter falling action.

  • The climax will happen much closer to the end of the story

  • than to the middle.

  • It's not a symmetrical mountain.

  • The action slows down.

  • The problem has been solved,

  • or maybe the problem has changed,

  • and the characters prepare for the last phase

  • of story, the resolution.

  • This is where we tie up loose ends,

  • characters reflect on what they learned,

  • maybe you set up a sequel.

  • Now, look, that was a lot of information all at once.

  • In order to make sense of it, let's apply all of those terms

  • to a story.

  • Now, our go-to has been the Three Little Pigs,

  • and while that's a story everyone knows,

  • I'm starting to think

  • it needs to be freshened up a little bit,

  • really working its franchise potential, you know?

  • So let's go through the elements of story

  • by looking at my new project,

  • a reboot of Three Little Pigs

  • that I'm calling TLP: Starbound.

  • See, it's Three Little Pigs, but it's in space.

  • That's a space helmet.

  • So I'm gonna put a little story map here in the corner.

  • Okay, so the exposition.

  • It's the future.

  • Pigs have expanded to every corner of the galaxy.

  • Three brave little pigs decide to strike out on their own,

  • exploring a new, exciting region of space.

  • One builds a spaceship out of straw.

  • Go with me here.

  • One builds a spaceship out of twigs.

  • And one builds a spaceship out of flexible hyper alloy

  • they developed in a laboratory.

  • She's the brainy pig.

  • So, we've got the setting.

  • It's the future, they're in space.

  • We've got our characters, the pigs.

  • Now, the conflict.

  • Along comes the notorious space pirate, Captain Wolf.

  • He's big, he's bad, he wants to blow up the spaceships

  • and eat the pigs.

  • He begins hunting down the pig ships, one at a time.

  • Think Captain Wolf has an eye patch?

  • No, he has a cyber eye; he's part robot.

  • And now we enter our rising action phase.

  • Captain Wolf engages the straw ship.

  • They have an exciting space battle.

  • (instructor making shooting noises)

  • And straw pig escapes in the little escape pod

  • to the twig ship!

  • But Captain Wolf follows.

  • He is undaunted.

  • The tension continues to rise.

  • He destroys the twig ship!

  • (instructor making shooting noises)

  • The two pigs escape again, this time to the brick house.

  • I mean, the flexible hyper alloy spaceship,

  • piloted by the science pig.

  • And now, we come to the climax.

  • Captain Wolf comes to the advanced ship.

  • He tries to blow it up, but he can't!

  • It's too powerful.

  • He decides to board the ship,

  • because that's the only way he'll get to eat the pigs.

  • But the pigs trap him in a space barrel

  • while he's still in the airlock.

  • They did it!

  • They solved the problem.

  • Captain Wolf is trapped in a space barrel,

  • and he can't eat them now.

  • The climax is passed, and now we enter the falling action

  • phase of the story.

  • In the version of the story that I know,

  • the three little pigs roll the barrel in to the river.

  • So I think maybe in this version

  • they punt the space barrel out the airlock

  • in to the cold void of space!

  • Or maybe they strand him on a deserted planet,

  • but in any case, they never have to deal

  • with the wolf again.

  • The threat is now gone.

  • And that means that the conflict has been resolved.

  • We're in the resolution part of the story now.

  • The first two little pigs,

  • the straw ship pig and the twig ship pig,

  • learned that they need to put more work

  • in to their spaceships if they wanna survive in space.

  • And they build fancy spaceships just like the science pig.

  • And that's an introduction to story elements.

  • Now that you're familiar with the ideas,

  • start applying them to your favorite stories.

  • You can do this with any form of media:

  • books, comics, TV shows, movies, games.

  • What's the conflict?

  • How is it resolved?

  • Once you start looking for story structure in entertainment,

  • you will find it everywhere.

  • Let us now what you see.

  • You can learn anything; David, out.

- [Instructor] Hello readers, I'm going to draw you

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B2 中高級

故事的要素 - 閱讀 - 可汗學院 (The elements of a story | Reading | Khan Academy)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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