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  • Hello subscribers and others.

  • It's David Hoffman, filmmaker with another clip from one of my old films.

  • In this case, we're looking at a nurse practitioner who has her own little shop in a poor area of Appalachia.

  • I really care about nurses and nursing, in part because my daughter is a nurse practitioner in San Francisco and also because I've had a couple of major medical shit in my life, and nurses were glorious to me the way they treated me.

  • Beautiful.

  • So I get this job to do something on nursing for a friend of mine, Mike Singer, who owns a company called Cherokee Uniforms that makes nursing uniforms.

  • And he gives me a grant to make what you're about to see, and I send my daughter on a terrific filmmaker, John Barrett, out to the middle of Appalachia to record Mon accounts one day in her life.

  • The way she treats these people, who are pretty sick by and large, who are poor and have hard times, I feel for them.

  • I feel for Americans, really, for all people who live with poverty and fear of medicine and medical crap.

  • I wish I didn't have any but we all do, don't we?

  • So watch Mona counts one day, just the life She lives as a nurse practitioner and then see what you feel about her and about nursing in general way are medically underserved area which is referred to as an emu A.

  • We're in a hips of which is a health professional shortage area.

  • And we have an extremely poor economic base.

  • And many of the patients we serve our poverty level health in Appalachia.

  • Its function not just absence of disease.

  • I think that's a very different kind of concept to deal with in what you see in maybe larger metropolitan areas.

  • What you think?

  • I think not not come here because of money.

  • Oh, no.

  • You can't wait that long to come in for that because that I We had this conversation once before, right?

  • You know, still.

  • Okay.

  • So you don't have the money, you come down, you can clean.

  • What do you want?

  • Your beer.

  • Oh, wait, That's right.

  • All right, well, I'm gonna go call lab and see what they have to say about that.

  • You have insurance now?

  • No, She hadn't had insurance for everyone.

  • It's a bill anyway, so years.

  • Yeah, but when we're doing the indigent, we're asking them.

  • Thio, pick up the other half.

  • Swallow.

  • Hey, can't wait that long between times.

  • Come on now.

  • I'm always on seven days a week.

  • That's good.

  • You're the primary caretaker, John.

  • I had Hey, I want to ask you something.

  • Maybe you might tell me.

  • No, my daughter and I wouldn't be what you call a guy if you mean her denial.

  • Okay, Which we are, remember?

  • Yeah.

  • The power of attorney or the executor of your you have to have him is on a must.

  • It's a good idea.

  • I don't know.

  • You were You were gonna call me with the bank lady's name and I was gonna help you do that.

  • Remember?

  • Do you have somebody appointed to speak for you?

  • I would not have attorneys.

  • I hated my No, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no.

  • I'm not a lawyer.

  • No, I'll do it myself.

  • What?

  • Can't Miss Rock.

  • See you sleeping already?

  • What happened?

  • I just started.

  • Not bad.

  • We'll breed.

  • That brought me.

  • And here My daughter's did okay.

  • Were you living with You don't know my daughter.

  • This is what the third time this year you've been in.

  • Okay, we're back to the beginning.

  • Where were you born?

  • Uh, rule town called Booth at home or in the hospital?

  • Home?

  • Home?

  • Okay.

  • Any stories about your birth?

  • It'll No.

  • They didn't have to put you in a shoebox or know anything like that.

  • Okay.

  • And I'll support fractured cat story.

  • Why not six months old, Doctor.

  • Give me up for dead.

  • Dr.

  • Talbert.

  • I know you've never heard.

  • Of course, it's been years ago and hey, they mail bed, get gave me poison.

  • Tell my mom about 24 hours after you give me my Madison that I would live and I live.

  • Oh, God.

  • Given poison killed courts.

  • What did you get into Fletcher's cast story?

  • Back that town.

  • That stuff.

  • It was poured poison.

  • A lot of Children at six months.

  • How'd you get it?

  • But I'll give it to me.

  • He didn't know that it was bad.

  • Okay.

  • And how far did you get to go in school?

  • Sixth grade.

  • And then what?

  • You do transfer with a white boy.

  • But I quit.

  • And then what did you do?

  • They put you work on the farm?

  • Yeah.

  • And what were you doing?

  • Mostly.

  • My dad was cold.

  • Would cut wood kind cold all I have.

  • And then what else do you get into?

  • So tell honored this loneliness.

  • Good.

  • We didn't give it up when you got older digit.

  • Okay.

  • Good.

  • When you were cutting co.

  • We're doing one of those little cold mind things.

  • Yes.

  • Okay.

  • What All illnesses have you had?

  • Well, I had a heart attack.

  • Had six drugs on.

  • I have a great hits back.

  • Yeah, I have a couple.

  • Three also are also way.

  • Call them.

  • Earn it What?

  • They've been talking out yet.

  • But that's geared to Cameron Longs.

  • Okay, that's better.

  • Yeah, right.

  • Did you ever smoke?

  • Yes, ma'am.

  • How much?

  • How about two packs a day?

  • Process of Well, start off about tan.

  • Still with Morgan.

  • You're still spoken down?

  • Yes, ma'am.

  • Two packs a day.

  • Yes, ma'am.

  • Would you like me to get your patch while you're in here?

  • I can't afford a baby now.

  • Well, no.

  • You have Medicare, right?

  • If it's one of the medicines you take while you're hospitalized, I think they will allow it.

  • Okay.

  • How far?

  • Okay, because it will.

  • When I admitted Roxy into the hospital.

  • I was extremely evident.

  • That rocks Iwas not feeling like Roxy that she probably was in pretty bad trouble at this point in time.

  • Usually, Roxy, even with her exacerbations of her COPD is still feisty and won't, you know, just gives everybody what for when she comes in And that type of things.

  • She's, uh but she was relatively quiet.

  • I mean, she was responsive in that kind of.

  • It's gonna be a harder recovery period, I think this time for have a seat.

  • Terrible.

  • Tell money you're ready to see her.

  • See, I washed a good friend of mine, go with Alzheimer's.

  • I helped take care of him.

  • His wife passed away and that, you know, and I forget a lot.

  • So naturally I'm concerned.

  • But I want to go through these tests because this could be just the beginning.

  • You know that what we do with these things as we do it once a year, some of them you'll remember some of me won't someone you don't care whether you remember or not.

  • And it's just, uh, make sure that we're keeping you healthy and that we don't miss something just because we know you right.

  • All right, all right.

  • Where What is the season?

  • Well, I wouldn't say it's beginning of the falsies.

  • Okay.

  • See, on TV the other day, they're talking about gasoline.

  • Generally, the fourth of September starts the fall season because people who had trapped okay and gas is gonna go down, maybe.

  • Okay.

  • And you know the date.

  • Uh huh.

  • 5th 5th of September.