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  • User review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news headlines in your everyday English I'm Catherine and joining me today.

  • Is Georgie there?

  • Hello, Georgina.

  • Eye on What's our story today?

  • Our story Today.

  • It's a festive story, and it's about sugar and hot drinks, sugar and hot drinks.

  • Let's hear more about that from this radio to BBC News Bulletin.

  • Campaigners have warned that some festive coffees and hot chocolate sold by high street chains contains shockingly high levels of sugar.

  • The group Action on Sugar wants them to be subject to the same sugar taxes.

  • Soft drinks.

  • Seven of the coffee chains in the study said they also offered healthier options.

  • Well, Catherine, do you like a festive hot drink?

  • I don't like the way the sweet ones, to be honest.

  • OK, so you're aware of this?

  • I, however, am not, And I love a hot chocolate with cream and marshmallows, so this news is a bit of a shock for me.

  • There were hearing that some festive hot chocolates and coffee's contain up to 23 tea spoons off sugars, which makes them extremely unhealthy.

  • I think the main point, though, is that a lot of people are not aware of this.

  • ATT all action or sugar feels so strongly that they think the's drinks should be subjected to the sugar tax.

  • So this will make the drinks more expensive on may put some people off from buying them.

  • I mean, in fact, is not just these festive drinks.

  • It can be other drinks, which are made with non dairy alternatives like goat milk on stuff like that.

  • So it is quite far reaching an interesting story.

  • 23 teaspoons, that's Yeah, sugar in war.

  • Anything that explains why I don't like them.

  • Okay, so you've been looking at the headlines around this story, and you've got three words and expressions that we can use to talk about it.

  • I have.

  • I've got overload crammed on dhe plant based overload crammed on dhe plant based Let's go to your first headline.

  • The first headline is from BBC News, and it is sugar overload warning for festive hot drinks overload.

  • Too much of something now.

  • This is a verb, isn't it?

  • It is a verb.

  • But actually, in this headline it's being used as a noun.

  • Interestingly, as a verb is a regular verb overload.

  • Overloaded.

  • Overload it, but it is spelled O v E R l oh, a d In the past tense, it's e d.

  • Is pronounced it, but it's spelt e d.

  • Um, you can break it down into two parts over which means higher or above something and load, which means the amount of something that you put into something.

  • Okay, so, like a washing machine, you can load your washing machine.

  • You can load your gear clothes into the washing machine.

  • Yet put everything you want to put into it, and you load that's cord to load.

  • You could say if you put too much into it.

  • The washing machine broke because it was overloaded.

  • My water bill.

  • She's quite smart, actually, because it knows.

  • I think I like to put a lot of washing in there.

  • And if sometimes I put so most Washington, it just goes beep, beep beep and it won't work.

  • No, it starts working.

  • It stops working temporarily because it's telling me, customer, you've overloaded may yes, take some of that washing out and then I work.

  • I think I need that because I'm always overloading my washing machine.

  • Itjust leaks everywhere.

  • Maybe I need to get it rendered.

  • So as you can tell, it means putting too much in.

  • You could also say the chocolate biscuits Rob loves are overloaded with chocolate overloaded with chocolate, so more chocolate than biscuit.

  • In far, 99%.

  • Chocolate is about Rob's kind of, yes, optimum chocolate level chocolate overload, and we use the proposition with then didn't we?

  • The biscuits are overloaded with chocolate.

  • Yes, so you have Thio.

  • You don't have to, but if you want to say what it's overloaded with, you're gonna use the proposition with okay, and you could also use it if you're talking about at a party Kid's party.

  • Kids running around everywhere, you might hear somebody say at the party.

  • There were loads of kids running around with sugar overload.

  • Sugar overload, a really nice kind of weird combination there.

  • Chocolate overload.

  • Sugar overload.

  • Yes, on here.

  • It's a noun overload.

  • So with comes before.

  • So with, uh, kids running around with sugar overload.

  • Okay, any synonyms as synonyms.

  • We've got some verb, synonyms, thio to overburden or to overwhelm, and they're both pretty good because they give us the idea that it's too much.

  • So it's It's slightly, it's negative.

  • You're not going to really hear it used in a positive way very often.

  • So you can say you're overwhelmed with work.

  • Yes, I'm overwhelmed, overloaded, overburdened with work.

  • Too much of it.

  • Got a word less work less People get overburdened, though.

  • Before we overwhelm you with more explanation about this word, we'll move on to our second headline, please.

  • Yes, so the second headline is from a mail online on is revealed.

  • The High Street's Christmas coffees crammed with nine times more sugar than a crispy cream doughnut on as many calories as a Domino's pizza crammed very full off something.

  • Yes, it's spelt c r a m M e d.

  • Don't forget the double M theat.

  • Actual base verb is cram, so C r A m.

  • But it's regular, so it's cram crammed, crammed, But notice the pronunciation of the D A is d know it as with overloaded on.

  • It means very full of something.

  • Okay, and we've got the proposition with this.

  • We want to say what?

  • We're very full off.

  • Yes.

  • So you would say crammed with something.

  • So, for example, the Christmas cake was crammed with fruits and nuts.

  • So really, really full of fruit and nuts.

  • Yeah.

  • In a good way.

  • Yeah, and in a good I loved you like a good crowd.

  • Okay.

  • Crammed full of food.

  • Yeah.

  • Or chocolate.

  • Anything.

  • Really?

  • Lots of flavours.

  • Yes.

  • Crammed with flavor.

  • I like something.

  • Yeah, crowned with flavor.

  • That's quite positive, isn't it?

  • Yes, it means, but it does.

  • It can be used in a negative way.

  • For example, the underground was crammed this morning.

  • I couldn't get a seat.

  • So to many people, you can't sit down.

  • Yes.

  • So you kind of have to think of the context and to work out whether it's positive or negative.

  • Okay.

  • And you got a really nice fishy expression, I believe for for being on a very, very crowded public transport or a room or elevator or something.

  • Yes, we were crammed in like sardines.

  • So I don't know if you know the tins of sardines.

  • Little fish, small fish, lying together very close together.

  • Can't move.

  • Georgie.

  • There was doing an impression of a salty and everybody you can actually see.

  • She's got her arm is very close to her body and she said, Yeah, raise nothing.

  • You can't do this.

  • If you're a sergeant flapping her wrong, you have to do this.

  • Yeah, really, really calm or no tightly packed.

  • Yeah, like Forget they can't see fate for the jug.

  • Georges Georges has now stopped a Saudi an impression.

  • The expression is to be crammed in like sardines.

  • Yes, so but you can.

  • Yes, and it's kind of the opposite way, opposite way from with.

  • So the Christmas cake was crammed with fruits and nuts, but you could say fruits and nuts were crammed into the Christmas cake.

  • So quite versatile.

  • Word is, yes, versatile.

  • Great.

  • Well, I don't think we can crumb anymore explanation into that one.

  • So let's move on to our final headline.

  • But before we do, if you want.

  • If you're a coffee lover and you'd like to see some more videos about coffee, we've got loads more on a website, and there's one in particular you're going to tell us.

  • Yes, it's called.

  • Does recycling coffee cups make a difference?

  • So the link is in the description box below.

  • Don't watch it now.

  • Save it for later.

  • Save it for later indeed.

  • Thank you.

  • You're watching BBC Living English.

  • This is news review on our final headline today.

  • Our final headline today is from the Independent On is customers ordering plant based milk are unknowingly consuming excessive sugar says study so plant based made from plants, not animals.

  • Shall we do the pronunciation first?

  • Yeah, I say plant based I say plant based on they're both wonderful pronunciations earned 100% correct in this context, where most contacts plant based is an adjective on its used to identify something as being made of plants and not containing any animal products s.

  • So we can split the world into two parts again.

  • Plant which refers to something that grows from the earth like a tree or a tomato plant Tomato, tomato plant You could say both on based, Which means the main thing that something is made from in this case plants Those two separate words Do we write them separately or do we join them together?

  • They are definitely two separate words.

  • But in this way, they're being used as an adjective.

  • And they are combined together with a hyphen between When you write down one word.

  • Yeah.

  • Okay.

  • Um what else have we got?

  • So it's a popular word at the moment people are becoming because people are becoming much more interested in eating less animal products or meat.

  • So, for example, you could say this is a popular plant based alternative to beef steak.

  • Um, you could also use it to talk about Ah, in other ways.

  • So you could say in the future, people might run cars on plant based fuels.

  • I think there is even a plant based diet as well.

  • I've heard of a plant based diet.

  • Yes, so you could make this kind of three word combinations or plump based fuel plant based foods.

  • Plant based diet?

  • Yes.

  • So it's a really kind of strong phrases we're hearing more and more.

  • Are we?

  • Yeah.

  • And actually, I think you should keep your keep your ears open on dhe.

  • Notice where else you hear it?

  • Because it will be used more and more over the coming years.

  • Super.

  • Thank you very much for that, Georgina.

  • Well, that's it for today.

  • You can find out lots more on our website and our social media challenges.

  • But we'll see you soon on the next news of you good bye.

  • Bye.

  • User review from BBC Learning English Way.

  • Hope you enjoyed that video on.

  • Thank you very much for watching.

  • We have so many more.

  • Just like it.

  • So if you don't want to miss a single one, make sure to subscribe.

  • I mean, we'll see you regularly hope to see you soon.

  • Bye, guys.

User review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news headlines in your everyday English I'm Catherine and joining me today.

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一杯熱飲含23顆糖!- 觀看新聞回顧 (23 sugars in one hot drink! - Watch News Review)

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