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  • Hello zombaes or shall I say heelo

  • Zombaes, I don't know why that became a thing.

  • today we are going to talk about the question

  • I get more than anything else and I know what you're thinking. It's Mikey

  • How are you so naturally tan?

  • But that is not it. The question that I get more than anything is

  • How to get started in makeup as a profession, what advice would I have to start it as a career?

  • Should you go to school?

  • How did you get started yourself stuff like that it's–ok, so that's a lot of questions

  • But you get the general gist I think in telling my story of how I got started

  • A lot of my advice will kind of come through in that a lot of people tell me that watching my videos helped

  • Start their passion for makeup and wanting to create a career out of it

  • So I hope that this helps some of you who are wondering what to do now that you have this sort of

  • Basis of knowledge where do you take it from here? How do you take it from a hobby to a job?

  • I also have something very cool to share with you at the end of this video

  • So make sure you watch till the very end or else or else you just won't see it

  • But, whatever

  • Ok let's get started. I have a dog hair on my nose and on my hands

  • What's going on?

  • So my first technical job as a makeup artist was on the set of a short film for a friend of mine while we were

  • In film school together he was doing his senior thesis he needs some 60's style makeup

  • He thought that I was good at my own makeup so he asked could I do it on someone else

  • which I had very little confidence in but I practiced on a friend I decided to do the makeup for the short film

  • I did it for free because we're all broke students that just helped each other out and that was technically my first

  • step into

  • Being a makeup artist, though I would not have called myself that at the time

  • My first paid job was when I get hired at a Mac counter and a Macy's Williger of Pennsylvania

  • What's up, and that felt like a fluke?

  • I kind of got suggested to interview by a friend who worked at the Clinique counter across the way and

  • They they asked me if I'd interview at the Mac counter which I thought was really nice

  • But that I wouldn't get the job because I didn't really know what I was doing on anyone else

  • except for myself I knew how to do my own makeup

  • Although my eyebrows were very questionable back then they're still questionable some days

  • But you know but back then I did not think I had the skill set to be a Mac makeup artist however

  • I rarely turned down opportunities to challenge myself, so I said I'd love to interview

  • I had a two-part interview where after the first one the manager at that counter was like I want to see

  • What the regional trainer thinks of you because even though you're very new to doing makeup

  • I think that he's very good at judging whether someone has the ability to pick up the skill quickly so I did a second interview

  • with him both interviews

  • I had to do makeup on a model

  • And I was so fresh to makeup at this point that I actually

  • Asked the manager of this Mac counter if I was allowed to touch my models face to do her makeup

  • Because I wasn't even sure if there was some kind of unspoken rule

  • That when you are the makeup artist applying makeup to someone else if you're allowed to physically touch their face with your skin

  • I thought maybe you had to do all the makeup using only brush to skin contact

  • And she was like oh

  • No like if you need to raise their eyebrows or something or touch anywhere on their face to get the makeup done

  • You can do that. That was foreign to me. That's how green I was so again

  • It's amazing that I ended up getting the job

  • But the regional trainer said that I learned very very quickly and that he saw a lot of potential in me

  • So they gave me the job and and that was the beginning of it

  • so I have a lot to actually thank to the manager their names Liz Bonnie pile is thank you so much for giving me a

  • Job and believing in me when I how many other people would have but that that vote of confidence from them

  • Helped me so much then I worked at Mac for three years

  • I learned a lot there just by observing and repeatedly working on customers over and over and over

  • They all had different skin types skin shades they all had different

  • Requests some people liked very little makeup some people wanted full glam so I really got the gamut of what?

  • People were looking for at least when they came to a Mac counter while I was working at Mac

  • I also applied for my first FX job at Eastern State Penitentiary, which if you don't know is this really?

  • massive

  • Old-ass abandoned prison well its not abandoned, now it's the thing it's like a historical site

  • But it's no longer a functioning prison in the middle of Philadelphia like it's like row homes businesses

  • giant block of castle walls and

  • Prison stuff it's really cool. Actually if you're ever in Philly. I highly recommend

  • You go see it because it is creepy, and it's cool

  • And it's really old and Al Capone used to have a cell there, and and it's just crazy

  • And they say it's haunted so if you like ghost hunting maybe try that out

  • But I mean I worked there for a couple years

  • And I used to walk the cellblocks alone by myself

  • And the dark at night same like "come at me bro" to the ghost and nothing

  • Maybe they were just intimidated by me, but I don't know I'm not really sold anyway

  • I got a job there as my first job doing special effects makeup and

  • For that that was another tricky thing where I'm really happy someone took a chance on me and hired me

  • I had some pictures of Halloween makeup

  • I had done on myself years prior where I did gory stuff, but it was very amateur. It was very um

  • It was very amateur. I wasn't taught in any formal sense at any point

  • so it was always just what I experimented with I might have fudged my

  • My application a little where I lied and said that I had worked with

  • There was like a section mix play. There's a section that was like have you heard of or used skin illustrator?

  • third degree

  • bondo

  • gelatin

  • latex prosthetics and

  • Truth be told I had only really worked with latex prosthetics. I didn't know what bondo was or pros-aide or skin illustrator

  • but

  • So when I applied and it said that I essentially needed to know these things to get the job

  • I said that I knew all of those things that I was familiar with them that I'd used them before and

  • Then I did a ton of research to figure out exactly what those things were

  • So that when it came time for the in-person interview

  • I

  • Could actually respond in a way that showed that I did know what I was talking about I knew that there was an opportunity for

  • beginners to get this job

  • So I knew that it wasn't vital that I knew the ins and outs of everything that they teach you they trained you there

  • However, I did yeah

  • so I kind of kind of lied that I knew some stuff that I didn't and then I learned it so I feel like that's

  • That's fair sometimes you have to do

  • What I'm trying to say is don't think that just because you are not

  • prepared for a job

  • It doesn't mean that you can't learn to be it doesn't mean that you shouldn't still try it because someone might take a chance on

  • You and then they might be able to teach you in that job

  • I was very fortunate that that happened for me twice in a row both for beauty and

  • Effects that I found people that believed in me. Shout out also too Ruby

  • who's the one who hired me at Eastern State Penitentiary for terror behind the walls because

  • She really took me under her wing and really kind of mentored me in that job

  • I'm very fortunate that I'm a fast learner because I think in both these instances that saved my ass

  • So if you don't know everything it's okay if you are observant and you're willing to

  • Work really hard what's going on with this? Oh, sorry about that. I look crazy

  • my foots asleep

  • uhhhh

  • Can't feel that at all this is not product placement for dr. Scholl's

  • I swear not sponsored so I worked at terra behind the walls for two

  • Years, I visited on year three, but I learned a lot there because again. I had to work on so many faces. I think there's

  • 200 actors at that haunted house that would come into the make up chairs and be split between something like ten make-up artists

  • So we constantly had people coming in the chair getting them out as fast as possible

  • We got to experiment we had general guidelines like this actor needed to have bruises and cuts in blood this actor needs to have

  • Infections so I got to again practice a range of things and I had to do it very quickly under pressure

  • Which really tested my ability to be creative

  • So those jobs were really invaluable to me as my starting points. I spent almost the entirety of my mac paycheck in mac

  • products to start building up a beauty kit Ruby from tower behind the walls was nice enough to put together a small FX kit for

  • Me to take home with myself

  • after the first year which

  • To this day is still one of the nicest things anyone has ever done for me and something that I am

  • Eternally grateful for I still have some of those things in my kit that haven't expired that she gave me and with those two small

  • kits with the knowledge that I built from both jobs and being directed by someone who said

  • We need this look for this thing for the haunted house

  • Having to deal with real world people. That said I want this in my life. Gave me a good mix of

  • Just just training life training on how to do makeup for a variety of things all the while for both of these jobs

  • I was going to school for film and when I finished school I

  • Had a job as a cocktail waitress for a couple years

  • Just to make money to save up to go to LA and I also did jobs in

  • Philadelphia on set I did some work for print

  • I did some work for short films things like that and then I moved out to LA after I'd saved up enough money and when

  • I got here

  • I just picked up any set job that I could get and by that I mean not just makeup

  • I was the production designer and something I was the art director and another thing

  • I was second second which is a camera

  • Department thing it was a DIT for something which if anyone's in film

  • You know that is a stressful job, but I did make up on a lot of things too, and it kind of sucked

  • I'm not gonna lie because unless you're in a union out here in LA jobs pay very poorly

  • I was working something like $100 a day for 12 or 14 hour days so that is

  • below minimum wage for a skilled job

  • That was if I got a kit fee on top of it

  • So I'm using my makeup out of my kid while working very long hours, and it's very inconsistent scary work

  • I was very grateful to get every job that I got but it is a tough industry and this was years ago

  • I mean all of these things

  • I'm not even sure how much they would really apply to today because it was a saturated industry before and it's just getting more

  • saturated I think because of social media really hyping up the interest for a lot of people in makeup a lot of people look to

  • Social media phones as a prerequisite for getting a job now in makeup

  • Alexa shut your face, which really is

  • Unfortunate I think because I don't think that your following should determine how qualified you are to do makeup on a face by face

  • basis anyway

  • so I don't know if just

  • Hoping that someone will take a chance on you the way that they took a chance on me will be sound advice however

  • That is how it started for me the best advice I can give you starts to deal with how I went from doing

  • makeup on set on clients on people to

  • Doing the YouTube thing actually. It's true that they say that out here in Hollywood

  • It's a lot about who you know, and I I knew that I didn't know anyone when I moved out here

  • So I wasn't getting jobs based on connections that I had

  • Personally I was only getting jobs based on my work and at that point in my life. I didn't have a very big portfolio of

  • Especially beauty makeup I had more of a portfolio from Tara behind the walls

  • I took a lot of pictures of my work there, but I didn't take hardly

  • I don't think I took any pictures of clients that I did at Mac which was a mistake so one big piece of advice I

  • Can give you is to

  • Always take pictures of your work because that is your calling card that is your business card in the sort of industry also

  • Experiment as much

  • you can try to work on as many different faces as you can like I said that was something that I got to do a

  • Lot just through the kinds of jobs

  • I picked up initially and that helps me learn so much YouTube wasn't really a thing back then in the sense that it was

  • full of makeup tutorials

  • I used to watch Kandy Johnson and

  • Michelle Phan way back in the day on like how to curl my hair with paper bags and stuff

  • But a lot of what I learned is just through experimenting on myself on

  • Clients on other people on people that I could experiment on like if a client asked for something

  • I gave them what they wanted obviously

  • But if I had any room to experiment if they gave me leeway I would try something that

  • Was a little newer to me the more you can experiment

  • The better you will get at something don't just keep doing what you're used to doing don't just keep doing what you're good at doing

  • Any chance you get to go outside of your comfort zone?

  • You need to do because that's how you grow as an artist it is possible to learn how to do makeup without makeup

  • tutorials because that's a big way that I learned but on top of being able to learn on your own naturally through experimenting and

  • Repetition you have makeup tutorials at your fingertips you have so much information on the Internet

  • So utilize the Internet to practice and learn new things as much as you possibly can

  • That wasn't even a part of my journey really for me, but that is something that is

  • invaluable today back to my little

  • Arc

  • Makeup I started taking pictures of my work

  • and I also started to just do work in order to take pictures to build a portfolio, so

  • There's a limitation

  • With set makeup where they'll say we need exactly this and you don't really get to necessarily showcase your best work

  • You just have to do what you're told which is good

  • It's good to be able to show that you can do what you are asked to do

  • But it's also good to have things in your portfolio that really show your true range

  • I wasn't doing work that showed my true range so I started taking pictures

  • Of what I thought showed my range. This is where Instagram started for me

  • I decided to challenge myself by doing 100 days of makeup wear every single day

  • I post something different makeup wise for a hundred consecutive days, and hopefully by the end of it

  • I'd have a hundred pictures that I could show to people to get more jobs

  • I posted them to Instagram just to hold myself accountable and in those 100 days

  • I went from 500

  • mostly personal followers on Instagram to about

  • 7,000 before day 100 came people were asking for makeup tutorials via video, and that is what started my whole channel and

  • I've always just been teaching what I know I'm definitely not the best makeup artist

  • I definitely haven't learned everything that I could know in makeup. There's always room for improvement

  • I think even if I was at the top

  • I would still say that there's room for improvement, but I'm certainly not there

  • And I've always just tried to share what I know because I know that that was a resource that I wish I had

  • When I was starting out

  • So I kind of liked the idea to that doing tutorials passed along this

  • information that I was lucky enough to learn because people took a chance on me so to sum it up most of the things I

  • Said is take pictures experiment try to work on as many different kinds of people and faces and jobs that you can

  • Realize that it's oversaturated

  • But that doesn't mean that you can't be successful

  • Into it it takes a lot of commitment usually to get to the point where it does pay pretty well

  • But then if you love it with anything as with anything if you love it

  • It is worth it

  • You also want to be obviously someone that people enjoy working with because that is another way that you will get jobs the life of

  • Most makeup artists is in freelance

  • Which means that you go from gig to gig and you're not exactly sure where the next thing is going to come from?

  • Which means that not only do you have to be good you have to be someone that people want to be around because that is

  • what will get you called back for the next thing and the next thing I don't know anything about that because I

  • Don't know why anyone would want to spend time with me like I said

  • I started this in 2010 so it's been a long process for me

  • But even four years ago when I first moved out to LA I was

  • So broke there's a point where I had two plastic plates to my name