Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • Hello world!

  • This is awkward,

  • my kids usually show what life is like in Japan

  • However, there's a topic which they couldn't help with:

  • Feeding yourself in Japan, with no Japanese,

  • because obviously they know Japanese.

  • As it happens, my brother and his family

  • came to visit us in Japan for the first time

  • and beyond "arigatou" and "oishii,"

  • They don't speak Japanese.

  • So,

  • being the exploitative younger brother that I am,

  • I documented their experience getting fed,

  • all the while offering little to no help.

  • We're going to go out and try to order some food

  • How are you guys feeling about that

  • I think it's gonna be okay,

  • I..I think that,

  • I'm hoping,

  • that they understand words like, "chicken" and "noodles."

  • But before I start showing their experiences,

  • let me lay down some basics about getting food while

  • out and about in Japan.

  • The first thing to figure out is where to find food.

  • The obvious answer would be to open your eyes,

  • because if you're in a place like Tokyo,

  • you'll easily find places everywhere.

  • But not all food establishments are equally accessible,

  • so, let me walk you through some of the easier ones.

  • The easiest by far is the "konbini" or convenience store.

  • If you can't find a convenience store

  • then maybe you will starve in Japan,

  • because they're all over the place

  • The great thing is that they're grab-and-go

  • You don't really need to do anything, but place your items on the counter and fork over your money

  • What can you eat there?

  • A standard to-go food is onigiri

  • Which are rice balls that normally have something nice on the inside and seaweed on the outside

  • My personal favorite is the 7-eleven premium salmon one

  • I know it's a fancy splurge costing 200 yen

  • Most onigiri are closer to 100.

  • By the way, just think of yen as cents.

  • So 200 yen would be approximately 200 cents or two US dollars,

  • making 100 yen about one dollar.

  • But you can buy much more than onigiri,

  • you can pick up anything in the refrigerated section

  • from sandwiches, to soba noodles, to chicken katsudon.

  • If the items need to be heated, the staff can do it at the counter

  • or sometimes there's a microwave accessible to the customer

  • Oh yeah, there's also plenty of hot treats at the front of the convenience store.

  • You can get nikuman, which is meat buns or pizza man

  • Which is a pizza bun, or you can get oden, which is great on a cold day

  • And there's also a dry section, where you can pick up breads

  • or perhaps a cup of noodles that you can fill up with the hot water, that's also available in the store

  • You really could survive off of konbini food,

  • but there's so much more

  • The next easiest choice is chain restaurants.

  • Like konbinis,

  • these should also be relatively easy to find

  • They're the most likely to have bright signs and big open windows, where you can see people eating inside

  • And if you're really unsure, they usually have these pictures of happy people on a poster

  • These are actually "employees wanted" posters, chains are always looking for new hires

  • So maybe you can also pick up a job at the same time

  • The majority of these places have picture menus and many of them have some English as well

  • Some are renovating,

  • and now have tablets that you can use to order from your table like this family restaurant called OOTOYA

  • And when it's time to pay, there's an automated machine where you can do that as well

  • But what you're probably more likely to find is a button.

  • So, once you've looked at your picture menu and are ready to order

  • Simply push the button, and then use that same finger to point at the menu to show what you want.

  • You can totally do this without Japanese,

  • but if you want to speak it a bit,

  • you could say "kore onegaishimasu"

  • Which means "this, please"

  • After every set of food is given to you, you'll usually receive your receipt

  • They're not trying to quickly kick you out, so feel free to push the button to order some more

  • When you're ready to go, just bring the bill up to the cashier at the front and pay up

  • As you probably know,

  • there's no tipping in Japan,

  • so I would highly recommend against it,

  • as you'll just confuse things.

  • With most restaurants, the staff generally leave you on your own unless you request help.

  • The staff will most likely only visit you three times:

  • Once to take the drink order,

  • once to give you the drinks and take your food order,

  • and once to give you your food and receipt.

  • If you want additional help, don't be afraid to say "Sumimasen,"

  • which means "excuse me,"

  • or put your hand up in the air.

  • Now sometimes you don't receive a receipt,

  • so in those cases, just go up to the counter to pay.

  • And honestly, the biggest tip I can give

  • when you don't know what to do,

  • is observe the locals and follow their lead!

  • Let's now move on over to the shopping mall.

  • Shopping malls are a reasonably easy place to eat

  • They'll have food courts where you can generally order at the counter

  • So easy in fact,

  • this is the first place I sent my brother

  • to try and get some food,

  • using his limited Japanese language skills...

  • Now, the reason I was laughing

  • was because usually when you have a bowl of udon,

  • you take one or two pieces,

  • but he's just going crazy taking a ton of tempura so

  • It's totally fine, you can do whatever you want,

  • But he was saying that, "Yeah, I had a lot of fried food."

  • Yeah, no wonder!

  • It seems like my brother did all right,

  • so I decided to see how my sister-in-law would fare.

  • That was "shichimi", or "seven spices"

  • and I explained,

  • I've only seen people put it in the dipping sauce,

  • not on the noodles.

  • Here's her second attempt

  • with the spice in the sauce, instead of on the noodles

  • After you finish, you clean and clear your table,

  • like your parents might have asked you to do at home.

  • Since many places will give you real dishes,

  • you have to return the dishes

  • back to the restaurant you bought it from.

  • This was filmed at Solamachi, a mall under Sky Tree,

  • so obviously, a massively popular tourist destination.

  • Using only English was no issue,

  • but even if the staff didn't understand English,

  • With the picture menus, it would have been easy for them to point and order

  • I'm glad we tried that, it's a very unique flavour

  • It's pretty easy,

  • really not that challenging at all.

  • Department stores are also great places to eat.

  • They're often found near busy train stations like in Shinjuku or Shibuya.

  • In the basement of these department stores

  • You'll usually find a big grab and go food section, where you can get all sorts of goodies.

  • Whether it be yakitori, sushi, or gift desserts

  • for that special obligation,

  • like the one you have to get for white day...

  • Anyway, most everything you'd want to buy is showcased,

  • making the point-and-get method extremely easy to do

  • Now, one area where you'll find lots of good places to eat

  • But that may not be apparent to visitors,

  • is office towers and department stores.

  • They usually have a whole floor or two dedicated to restaurants.

  • There's a few reasons I like these places,

  • generally the food is of higher quality than your family or chain restaurants found out in the streets,

  • the majority of them also don't allow smoking, which can be tricky to find in Japan.

  • They're used to catering to busy office people or visitors.

  • So, you'll find a lot of them have food displays or picture-heavy menus

  • You'll also find a good variety of restaurants all within a small area.

  • So you don't need to endlessly walk around town,

  • trying to find something that makes everyone happy

  • So safely ordering some tasty food

  • is a fairly easy thing to do on these food floors

  • Something that I haven't done,

  • but that I read somewhere that makes so much sense,

  • is to take a picture of the menu item you'd like to order

  • That way when you go inside to order you can simply show your waiter what you want to eat

  • Even if you can speak some Japanese

  • The menus can be hard to read, as you'd need to know a fair amount of kanji, the Chinese characters that Japanese use

  • That's where an app like Google Translate can help, as you can use the image function to translate the pictures

  • For example these are bamboo noodles

  • Okay, that's not really right, because in reality this is tantanmen, a spicy ramen noodle dish originating from China

  • What about this curry?

  • First up is live ball warm ball, not too promising

  • The next one cheese curry, that's accurate. I don't know about this though, men's curry on the meadow?

  • Prawn fried fish is close enough. So perhaps you'll have a 50/50 chance of getting what you think you're ordering

  • Luckily, this is a chain restaurant

  • So they have pictures and even some English to go along, no need to do Japan on native mode yet

  • With some places,

  • you can simply use the ticket machine

  • If you're lucky, it'll have pictures or English on it.

  • If not, it'll be a fun game

  • Here's my bro, trying for the first time.

  • Now, it could be my brother was messing with me,

  • but I truly think he was trying

  • to put money into the light indicator

  • instead of into the big slot underneath it.

  • So, he kept on taking too long,

  • and his money got spit back out at him a few times.

  • But eventually, he figured how to push buttons

  • within a reasonable timeframe

  • and went on to order.

  • Honestly, if you're having difficulty ordering,

  • A Japanese staff member is likely

  • to walk you through it.

  • So as long as you can point at the item you want and say, "Kore onegaishimasu,"

  • You'll probably get fed.

  • I only showed Tokyo in this video,

  • and many places around the city

  • are used to non-japanese speakers,

  • but even half a decade ago,

  • I traveled around Japan to some remote places

  • and was always able to get something in my stomach.

  • So I trust you'll be just fine in Japan.

  • If you've traveled to Japan before,

  • What tips would you give to a first-timer?

  • Let us know!

  • Thanks for watching.

  • See you next time!

  • Bye!

Hello world!

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

A2 初級 美國腔 多益

在日本,不會日語也能自食其力嗎? (Can You Feed Yourself in Japan With No Japanese?)

  • 4143 128
    Emily 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
影片單字