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  • With a major battle brewing in Syria and a major storm brewing near the U.S., we have

  • a lot to cover today. I`m Carl Azuz

  • explaining world news for CNN 10. Nations around the world had been watching and debating

  • solutions for years to the bloody civil war in Syria.

  • It started in 2011. Hundreds of thousands have lost their lives. The war has involved

  • different rebel groups and some terrorist groups who are

  • fighting the Syrian government for control of the country and that government with the

  • support of Russia has gained back a lot of ground.

  • There`s one last significant hold out for Syrian rebels. It`s in a city named Idlib

  • but this is also a de-escalation zone. A place where fighting

  • is supposed to limited and many Syrian civilians have fled there from other parts of the country

  • for safety.

  • Syria says terrorists there have forced the government to attack. The Syrian and Russian

  • forces have carried out more than 100 air strikes on

  • Idlib. But the U.S. and some other countries want these air strikes to stop. They say Syria

  • and Russia are using the terrorists as an excuse to

  • attack and that the militaries have targeted hospitals, medical facilities and civilian

  • volunteers. The United Nations says there are nearly 1

  • million children in Idlib and that the crisis in the city could turn into a humanitarian

  • nightmare. Among the millions who`ve been displaced in

  • Syria`s civil war, more than 30,000 people from Idlib alone have been forced to flee.

  • Yet another Syrian family is on the move. Like millions of others over the last seven

  • years who fled their homes as their

  • towns and villages became battle forts (ph). This family is fleeing for the first time

  • from rural Idlib. They lived in an area that had been

  • spared the fighting until now.

  • It was the first time we saw bombing says 15 year old Lala (ph). We`ve seen it on television

  • and on

  • phones and now it`s right before our eyes.

  • Syrian government and Russian aircraft have intensified air strikes in preparation for

  • the much anticipated offensive to regain

  • control of Idlib province. But a last stronghold held by an armed opposition now dominated

  • by Islamic extremists. Lala`s (ph) family has

  • come to a camp, one of many near the Turkish border. Their tent is ready. It`s hot. They`re

  • tired. Others arrive, more than 30,000 people have had

  • to leave their homes in Idlib in the past week. Half the population here comes from

  • other parts of Syria, now under government control. Lala`s (ph)

  • father, Abu Hamad (ph) pitches in with setting up their tent. When it`s done he goes to get

  • Lala (ph). She`s been unable to walk since childhood.

  • Their tent is bare. They left home in a hurry leaving behind most of their possessions.

  • We escaped with only our lives says Abu Hamad (ph) who worked as a stove repairman. The

  • U.N. gave us this tent but

  • nothing with it.

  • It`s a new home Lala (ph) is finding difficult to come to terms with. Ben (inaudible), CNN.

  • At least five American states and the District of Columbia have declared states of emergency.

  • This is an effort to make sure that help and

  • funding are there for those who need it, when they need it. And the reason for this is creeping

  • up on the U.S. East Coast. At one point on Wednesday,

  • Hurricane Florence weakened a bit to a Category 3 storm with wind speeds of 125 miles per

  • hour. But it`s still one of the strongest storms to stalk

  • the area in decades. By noon on Thursday, forecasters say that the North Carolina coast

  • will feel the blast of tropical storm force winds and that

  • hurricane force winds and dangerous storm surges will be lashing the state Thursday

  • night. But while they don`t know exactly when and where Florence

  • will make landfall, forecast models are predicting that the storm could slow down right at the

  • coast and then turn to the Southwest.

  • So here`s how it happens. Here`s our hurricane, right there. What we`re steering it with now

  • is this high pushing it that

  • direction, while all of a sudden by Friday there`s another high right there saying not

  • so fast. You`re not going to go any farther than that. So now

  • we`re going to push you ahead to what happens Saturday and Sunday. You would think, oh,

  • there`s a little - - there`s a glitch there. You can get

  • up through here. You can go to the north. No. Because by then, another high is here

  • blocking it this way, blocking it this way and blocking it

  • this way. No place for it to go except right where it is. And that`s what`s going to make

  • all the rainfall for hours and hours and hours.

  • And that`s why CNN meteorologists say bad news for the coasts of North Carolina, South

  • Carolina and all points inland. Because in

  • addition to sustained hurricane winds and storm surges, Florence could bring as much

  • as 40 inches of rain to these areas and that could cause

  • catastrophic flooding to the Carolinas that could last into next week.

  • 10 Second Trivia. The worst day in U.S. Stock Market History occurred in what year? 1929,

  • 1933, 1987 or 2008. Black Monday, the worst single day

  • in U.S. Stock Market History took place in 1987.

  • And that was because of a percentage drop. The Dow Jones Industrial Average plummeted

  • 22.6 percent on that single day but the market recovered

  • relatively quickly. It didn`t have a lot of long term effects. That`s unlike what was

  • happening 10 years ago. Lehman Brothers and International

  • Financial Services Company went bankrupt on September 15th, 2008. It was a tremendous

  • casualty of the "Great Recession" that hit in 2008 and 2009.

  • Also known as the Global Economic Downturn or the Financial Meltdown, the recession`s

  • effects spread far beyond Wall Street. The U.S. Unemployment

  • Rate eventually hit 10 percent. U.S. poverty levels rose and they took until 2017 to go

  • back down to where they were before the crisis. The

  • ripple effects of the "Great Recession" led to recessions around the world.

  • The scope of this fall, breathtaking. First, Bear Stearns, now Lehman Brothers and Merrill

  • Lynch.

  • Is your money safe? Is your job safe? Economists say this is the worst financial crisis since

  • the Great Depression.

  • It was dramatic. It was so dramatic. And what could have happened was so scary. What could

  • have happened if policy makers and big executives and

  • luck didn`t all line up perfectly was your credit card wouldn`t work. Your - - you wouldn`t

  • be able to get money out of your bank account. There

  • could have been a run on the banks. But you didn`t want as a reporter, you didn`t want

  • to scare people but you had to tell them exactly what was

  • happening.

  • Lehman Brothers for 158 years, a cornerstone on Wall Street. Failure to find a buyer over

  • the weekend means it is now bankrupt.

  • But the mess that Wall Street made, is the mess that Main Street is now feeling as bank

  • react with a sharp tightening of credit in a highly

  • uncertain market making business loans harder to come by.

  • I remember long conversations, some on the record, some off the record with banking officials

  • and bank CEO`s and editors,

  • trying to make sure we struck just the right tone. To let people know this is bad and maybe

  • millions of people are going to lose their jobs and a lot

  • of businesses are going to shut down. But you don`t want to incite a run on the banks

  • where people panic too much. I mean, it was a dramatic and it

  • was a - - I hope it was a once in a lifetime set of conversations.

  • The crisis of confidence that first hit home prices, then mortgage investments that finance

  • the housing boom has now claimed two

  • of Wall Street`s most venerable names. Lehman Brothers declaring bankruptcy. Merrill Lynch

  • selling itself to Bank of America. Both occur

  • under Washington`s watchful eye.

  • The scary part of it was if Lehman Brothers could fail and I remember saying this on the

  • air. If Lehman Brothers can fail,

  • what could happen to all these other banks, these bigger banks, these better banks and

  • others that are - - that - - that weren`t as solid. What

  • does it say about the American - - the International Financial System, if Lehman Brothers in business

  • for 158 years could fall apart in 72 hours.

  • That was what was really scary.

  • Why hang 10 when you hang 20. Maybe not a common trick for people but they`re not the

  • ones surfing here. In Delmar, California,

  • there`s a surf competition for canines and most of them seem to like it anyway. Yes,

  • their owners help them catch the waves but the rest is up to

  • the dogs. The event helps raise money for orphaned pets in the area and so the land

  • lubbers don`t feel left out, there`s also a costume contest. Of

  • course, we`d expect certain breeds to have an advantage in surfing like the "Wavemeriner",

  • the "Shiperkee" any of the water dogs. The Chesapeake Bay

  • Retriever, the "Chiuawaverider" and of course the "Chinese Crested", but when it comes to

  • sniffing out "barking" waves we`re pretty sure the

  • champion would have to be the "Border Collie". I`m Carl Azuz for CNN.

With a major battle brewing in Syria and a major storm brewing near the U.S., we have

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