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  • This just in. You are looking at obviously a very disturbing live shot there. That is

  • the World Trade Center and we have

  • unconfirmed reports this morning that a plane has crashed into one of the towers.

  • Another one just hit the building. Wow.

  • There are no words.

  • It appears that something hit the Pentagon on the outside of the 5th corridor.

  • We have a report now that a large plane crashed this morning north of the Summerset County

  • Airport which is in Western

  • Pennsylvania.

  • It all started at 8:45 on a clear Tuesday morning. We had a live camera up on what looked

  • like a smoking slash

  • across one of the World Trade Center Towers. A passenger plane had flown into it and I

  • remember some of us here at CNN thinking this was some sort

  • of freak event. Then a second plane flew into the other tower. That was at 9:03 a.m. and

  • at that point there was this deepening dread in everyone.

  • Something was wrong in a way we`d never seen before. Airports, bridges, tunnels in New

  • York and New Jersey shutdown. Within 30 minutes, President

  • George W. Bush said we were under an apparent terrorist attack and minutes after that every

  • airport in the country was closed. That had never

  • happened before.

  • It wasn`t over though. At 9:43 a.m., a third passenger jet crashed into the Pentagon. Dark

  • smoke rolled up from that part of that huge building.

  • All lives and many cameras were on that and the two burning towers in New York. And as

  • all of us watched at 10:05, one of those towers gave way

  • where it was smoking . The top part crushing down on the rest of it and sending up debris

  • in boiling gray clouds. Five minutes later part of the

  • Pentagon collapsed and a fourth hijacked jet crashed in a rural part of Pennsylvania. The

  • White House, the United Nations, the State and Justice

  • Departments, the World Bank all evacuated. America bound Atlantic flights were rerouted

  • to Canada and the second Trade Center Tower came down at

  • 10:28.

  • So many closings, evacuations, shutdowns, except for emergency response teams, the heroes

  • of 9/11, the country virtually stopped what it was doing

  • and gathered around TV screens. The President appeared just after 1 p.m. and asked Americans

  • to pray and there wasn`t much else we could do. The

  • destruction was more or less done around 10:30. It was less than two hours from the first

  • crash but the change it inflicted was immeasurable. More

  • Americans were killed on September 11th, 2001 than on the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor

  • in 1941. And when President Bush addressed the nation that

  • night at 8:30, his tone was one of sympathy, resolve and warning to anyone who`d planned

  • or supported the attacks.

  • We will make no distinction between the terrorists who committed these acts and those who harbor

  • them.

  • In the difficult days that followed, we learned that the Al- Qaida terrorist group led by

  • Osama Bin Laden was responsible for all of this. And America`s attention and anger turned

  • to Afghanistan who`s

  • Taliban leaders were giving Al-Qaida a safe place to live and operate.

  • The events of the day that changed America. On December 18th, 2001 Congress passed a resolution

  • allowing the President to designate

  • Patriot Day. This has been done on each anniversary of the attacks. Flags are flown at half staff.

  • American`s pause to remember the victims of

  • September 11th and memorials like this new one in rural Pennsylvania honor the innocent

  • lives lost. The tower of voices stands 93 feet tall. It`s

  • located on the Flight 93 National Memorial Site near Shanksville. This is where some

  • of the 9/11 hijackers are believed to have intentionally crashed

  • the plane after passengers and crew members tried to get control of it back from the terrorists.

  • The tower features 40 wind chimes. One for each of the victims and it`s architect says

  • it sounds will always change with the wind that blows across

  • the field making it a type of living memorial. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania

  • Trump are scheduled to participate in a Memorial Service

  • here on Tuesday. A service in Arlington, Virginia is also planned in honor of the 184 people

  • who were killed at the Pentagon when American Airlines

  • Flight 77 was crashed there. And in New York City, CNN was allowed to tour the National

  • September 11th Memorial and Museum when it opened. On this

  • 17th anniversary of the attacks, we`re taking you inside to show you how the events and

  • those effected our remembered.

  • These tridents were from the North Tower. They were recovered in the aftermath of the

  • attacks. We

  • brought them back here and basically built a museum all around them.

  • Joe Daniels is President and CEO of the 9/11 Memorial. You`re not whitewashing it. This

  • is the raw, dirty material.

  • Exactly. I mean, this is the steel that - - that bore the attacks.

  • The museum is built almost entirely underground, some 70 feet down. It sits in the precise

  • footprint of the World Trade Center.

  • So this is exactly where the South Tower started and went up 1,350 feet.

  • A striking display of the sheer scale of the destruction with poignant reminders of the

  • tragedy at every turn. I mean, this - - this is

  • unbelievable.

  • This is actually the front of this fire truck. This is the cab.

  • You wouldn`t know.

  • You wouldn`t know. And it`s - - it`s completely burned out and destroyed.

  • Then there`s the retaining wall that remarkably held strong even when the towers fell.

  • When the towers came down, all that debris that was here right in this space provide

  • bracing for that wall. And when that debris was cleared

  • there was a big concern that the wall would breach, would flood lower Manhattan.

  • It could have been so much worse but this wall held under all of that pressure. Visitors

  • will also walk along side the survivor stairs.

  • Used by hundreds of people as the buildings are crumbling, running from the dust cloud

  • to escape to safety. And it`s for all our

  • visitors to understand the story of survival.

  • And likely one of most emotional stops in the museum, this art installation mimics the

  • blue sky on that fateful morning. Behind it, the

  • still unidentified remains of 9/11 victims. The move met with mixed emotion from their

  • families.

  • A still shocking statistic is that 1,100 family members never got any human remains back to

  • bury. Never got to go through the ritual of

  • laying their loved ones to rest. It`s not a public space at all. Only family members

  • are allowed back behind the wall.

  • Right next door, a room dedicated to the lives of those lost.

  • Exactly. That room is in an area called "In Memoriam" and it`s a photographic portrait

  • of each and everyone of the 2,983 victims. You see

  • pictures. A - - a father coaching his son`s Little League team. A wedding. You see the

  • lives that were - - that were lost that day and not

  • just about how they died. It`s who these people were.

  • Throughout the museum, chilling reminders of the day. Handmade fliers for the missing,

  • a cross emerging from the wreckage, every day items

  • simply left behind.

  • We help through these artifacts and images tell that story of just, it was panic.

  • And while the museum is vast, one small exhibit has been the biggest source of controversy.

  • It`s focus, the terrorists themselves

  • including a film criticized for not making a clear enough distinction between Islam and

  • Al-Qaida. There`s been a lot of criticism. Why give any

  • time to the terrorists?

  • You know, it`s - - it`s - - one way to look at it is, you don`t build a Holocaust museum

  • and not be very clear that the Nazis were the ones

  • who committed those atrocities. Al-Qaida was an extremist, terrorist group but no one will

  • come through this exhibit and in any way think that we are

  • indicting an entire religion which we in no way are.

  • It seems very appropriate that you end here at the last call.

  • And it`s - - again goes right back to resiliency. Seeing those messages of hope and remembrance

  • on this very tall column that`s still

  • standing strong.

  • Kate Baldwin, CNN, New York.

  • One other story we`re following today, the approach of Hurricane Florence to the U.S.

  • East Coast. This storm was located about

  • 500 miles southeast of the Island of Bermuda last night. Forecasters don`t know exactly

  • where it`s going but they think Florence will move between

  • Bermuda and the Bahamas through the middle of the week and possibly make landfall in

  • the Carolinas on Thursday night. Those two states and Virginia

  • have declared states of emergency. Mandatory evacuations have been ordered on some parts

  • of the U.S. East Coast. On Monday, Hurricane Florence

  • quickly strengthened to Category 4 status.

  • It`s sustained wind speeds were at least 130 miles per hour. That makes it capable of causing

  • catastrophic damage if it stays that strong. It may

  • not. We`ll be covering this dangerous system as disaster preparations are made and as the

  • Atlantic hurricane season reaches it`s peak. That will

  • wrap up today`s show on CNN 10. I`m Carl Azuz and we thank you watching this September 11th,

  • 2018.

This just in. You are looking at obviously a very disturbing live shot there. That is

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