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  • A pair of storms starts off CNN 10 today. My name is Carl Azuz. It`s great to see you

  • this September 5th. First we`re

  • taking you to the Eastern Asian country of Japan which has just weathered it`s strongest

  • typhoon in decades. Japanese Public Broadcast Company, NHK

  • reports that at least 6 people have died and 160 have been injured since Typhoon Debbie

  • made landfall on Tuesday. It hit the southern part of the

  • island nation as the equivalent of a Category 1 hurricane. Before it made landfall, Debbie

  • had sustain wind speeds of 87 miles per hour. It soaked

  • some parts of Japan with 20 inches of rain threatening widespread flooding.

  • It pushed ocean water ashore in a storm surge and it lashed buildings with rain and winds

  • strong enough to rip off roofs. Hundreds of flights were

  • cancelled in the region. 14,000 people were moved to refuge zones like school gyms and

  • town halls and a tanker ship was blown from it`s anchorage

  • at sea into a bridge in southern Japan. Though 11 crew members were aboard at the time, no

  • one was hurt. In the Gulf of Mexico, a Tropical Storm

  • named Gordon was spinning its way toward Mississippi Tuesday night and forecasters expected it

  • would develop into a hurricane before it made

  • landfall with sustained winds of at least 74 miles per hour. Gordon`s storm surge was

  • expected to be as high as 3 to 5 feet above sea level.

  • States of emergency were declared in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. That can speed

  • up funding and aid to those who need it and while people

  • near the beaches and coastal rivers of those states made preparations for the storm. The

  • National Hurricane Center said heavy rain could be expected

  • from the Florida Panhandle all the way to southern Arkansas.

  • Typhoons or hurricanes are cyclones. They are the same thing just in different oceans.

  • A lot like hot cake is a flapjack is a

  • pancake is a short stack. If you are west of the dateline, so west of Hawaii, north

  • of the Equator, you`re a typhoon. If you`re in the Atlantic

  • or the Pacific around America you are a hurricane. And if you are around the Indian Ocean or

  • in the Southern Hemisphere, you`re a cyclone. So it`s

  • not out of question for a hurricane to become a typhoon if it moves over the dateline. In

  • fact, after crossing the International Dateline,

  • Hurricane Genevieve turned into Typhoon Genevieve a few years ago.

  • There are currently 8 sitting justices at the U.S. Supreme Court. One retired this summer

  • and Senate hearings are entering their

  • second day Wednesday for President Donald Trump`s choice to fill the vacancy. The nominee

  • is Brett Kavanaugh. He`s currently a U.S. Court of

  • Appeals Judge. His first day of hearings was yesterday and it got off to a tense start.

  • Some protestors were escorted out of the room for shouting as

  • the hearing began. There were also attempts by Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee

  • to interrupt and postpone the hearing.

  • Some said they wanted more time to review 42,000 documents related to Judge Kavanaugh

  • that were released the night before the hearing. Republicans

  • said that more than 500,000 documents had already been released before then and with

  • the U.S. mid-term elections scheduled for November 6th, some

  • Democrats have indicated they want to slow down these proceedings until after the elections

  • take place. While Republicans have signaled they want

  • to get Judge Kavanaugh confirmed to the High Court before the elections.

  • Analysts expect that Judge Kavanaugh`s nomination will move forward as scheduled despite yesterday`s

  • delays. The U.S. Constitution doesn`t

  • specify how many justices need to serve on the High Court and the actual number of them

  • fluctuated until Congress set the number at 9. That

  • happened in 1869 and it`s been that way ever since.

  • 10 Second Trivia. Which of these African nations who`s capitol is Gaborone is located between

  • Namibia and Zimbabwe? Angola, Mozambique, Zambia or

  • Botswana? In southern Africa only Botswana lies directly between Namibia and Zimbabwe.

  • Botswana`s home to the largest elephant population on the African continent. There are an estimated

  • 130,000 of the animals there. In nearby

  • countries like Angola and Zambia, elephants have been heavily poached, illegally hunted

  • for their ivory tusks which are tremendously valuable on

  • the Black Market. But Botswana used to be a place of relative safety for elephants.

  • The last time the conservation group Elephants Without Borders

  • audited northern Botswana in 2014, it found 9 elephant carcasses. In it`s most recent

  • survey, it found 90.

  • Getting ready to fly in Botswana`s far north.

  • Elephantocologist Mike Chase has spent years counting Savanna elephants from the sky.

  • Never before have we ever conducted a standardized survey for African elephants at a continental

  • scale. All right, start counting.

  • I see (inaudible).

  • Hundreds of air crew counted elephants in 18 countries across the continent over two

  • years.

  • Elephants seven. Seven elephants. Right?

  • For three hours a day, they flew 10 minute (inaudible) at a time. Flying the distance

  • to the moon and then some. Their results

  • more shocking than anyone imagined.

  • Flying over areas where elephants (inaudible) occurred but are no longer (inaudible) habitats.

  • Killed for the ivory, in seven short years up to 2014 elephant numbers dropped by a staggering

  • amount, almost 1/3. Across Africa

  • their numbers are crashing. If nothing changes, the elephant population will halve in less

  • than a decade. In some areas, they will go extinct.

  • It`s incredibly disheartening. Because I know that historically these ecosystems supported

  • many thousands of elephants

  • compared to the few hundreds or (inaudible) of elephants. Some landscapes we saw more

  • dead elephants than live elephants.

  • Botswana is one of the last strongholds of elephant but now the poaching walls are on

  • it`s doorstep. Now it seems like there`s a

  • disturbing up tick in the poaching on the borders of Botswana and in Namibia.

  • I don`t think anybody in the world has seen the number of dead elephants that I`ve seen

  • over the last two years of the great elephant

  • census and for me this becomes a lot more personal. It`s hit home. And, you know, I`ve

  • often been asked if I`m optimistic or pessimistic about the

  • future of African elephants. And on days like today, I - - I feel like we are failing elephants.

  • I thought Botswana had long eluded the ivory walls

  • but all evidence to the contrary.

  • We`ll continue to check branch two.

  • To fight the wall Botswana has mobilized the army (inaudible). With more than 700 troops

  • guarding it`s northern border.

  • Patrols spend days in the bush on foot. They`re up against a sophisticated enemy.

  • So we`re looking for any sign of poachers. If they come across and they`re often highly

  • organized groups of about 12 people,

  • two of them could be sheeters (ph) often. And those sheeters (ph) are frequently foreign

  • special forces.

  • Mike Chase`s research proves that if we can`t protect elephants. They will learn to protect

  • themselves.

  • We can hear them snoring. He is in his prime about 30 to 35 years of age and it`s these

  • young bulls that have the propensity to move

  • dramatic distances and map their trans-boundary conservation corridors.

  • But their satellite tracking shows the elephants use incredible levels of intelligence to avoid

  • poaching hotspots in neighboring

  • countries. Retreating to the relative safety within Botswana.

  • We`re using this technology to safeguard and protect elephants to find them quickly and

  • respond. It`s quite incredible being

  • this close to this animal. It`s - - it`s (inaudible)

  • We called this bull Promise. For the promise that Mike Chase has made to save this magnificent

  • species.

  • The mayoral race in Idyllwild, California has gone to the dogs. This is Maximus Mighty

  • Dog Muller (ph) the Second. So you can see why they

  • just call him Max. He`s not only a Golden Retriever, he`s the mayor. And while he just

  • sits around, gets treats and lets people pet him, the office

  • is run by his Chief of Staff, his owner. Idyllwild has had pets for mayors since 2012. Residents

  • have to pay $1.00 to vote and the election raises

  • money for animal rescue that we`re sure a few bucks find their way to "pet projects".

  • Now we`re not sure who leads as majority or minority "whippet".

  • Who heads up important "debarkments" like "pugs and recreation" or if any of this is

  • even "beagle". But we`ll bet security`s provided by a "boxer".

  • Transportation`s provided by a "greyhound". And bureaucracy`s probably held up by a "terrier".

  • I`m Carl Azuz.

A pair of storms starts off CNN 10 today. My name is Carl Azuz. It`s great to see you

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中新網10年9月5日電 (CNN 10 September 5, 2018)

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