Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • Broadcasting from the CNN Center in Atlanta, Georgia, I`m Carl Azuz. Welcome to the show.

  • We hope you enjoyed the

  • Labor Day holiday. It you`re just now starting to watch CNN 10, we welcome you and thank

  • you for taking time to hear objective explanations of what`s

  • going on in the world. In the South American nation of Brazil, history has been lost. A

  • fire started Sunday evening at the country`s National Museum.

  • And though firefighters worked throughout the night to try to stop it, you can see from

  • this video while one museum official says very little will be

  • left.

  • No serious injuries were reported and authorities don`t know yet what caused the fire or how

  • many artifacts were destroyed. But observers expect

  • that most of them were probably burned. This building itself is historic. It used to be

  • the home of a Portuguese royal family. It was converted into

  • a museum 200 years ago and since then it`s collected 20 million artifacts that date back

  • thousands of years. It houses everything from the oldest

  • human remains ever identified as being from Brazil to the largest meteorite ever found

  • in Brazil. The National Museum is known around the world for

  • it`s priceless collection and it`s research.

  • And while a Brazilian government official says he wants fire preparedness to be evaluated

  • at every other museum in the country to try to avoid this

  • anywhere else. The nation`s President says, the loss of artifacts at the National Museum

  • is insurmountable for Brazil.

  • 10 Second Trivia. Which of these landmarks in Washington, D.C. was completed in 1935?

  • Washington Monument, Supreme Court Building, Lincoln

  • Memorial or National Portrait Gallery. The building of the nation`s highest court was

  • completed in 1935. Before that, the Court had no

  • permanent home of it`s own and met in various other places.

  • Following the Labor Day holiday, as people across America go back to work and school

  • one task ahead of the U.S. Senate is holding confirmation

  • hearings for Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Those start today. Kavanaugh is a U.S. Court of

  • Appeals Judge. He`s also President Trump`s choice to join

  • the Supreme Court. Judge Kavanaugh would replace Justice Anthony Kennedy who retired from the

  • High Court earlier this year. President`s can`t

  • directly appoint Supreme Court Justices. They have to nominate them and the Senate gives

  • advice and consent, a phrase from the U.S. Constitution by

  • holding hearings and then voting on whether it approves the President`s choice.

  • Judge Kavanaugh is President Trump`s second nominee to the High Court. His first was confirmed

  • in April of last year when Justice Neil Gorsuch

  • completed the process to replace Justice Antonin Scalia who died the year before. There`s been

  • a largely partisan fight over whether Judge Kavanaugh

  • should be confirmed to the High Court. Most Republicans appear to support his nomination.

  • Most Democrats appear to oppose it and as Jeff Tuban

  • explains, the political divide over Presidential Supreme Court Nominees is nothing new.

  • Federal judges including Supreme Court Justices serve for life. That`s why President`s regard

  • these judicial

  • appointments as such an important way to extend their own legacies. The Constitution does

  • not set out a resume that a Supreme Court Justice has to

  • have. There`s no requirement in the Constitution that a Supreme Court Justice even be a lawyer

  • but traditionally President`s have nominated

  • impeccably qualified sitting judges.

  • Both Presidents and Senators like to say that the confirmation process is all about qualifications

  • but it`s really also about politics. Virtually

  • every important issue in American politics and even American life winds up in front of

  • the Supreme Court and they have the last word. Both the

  • President and the Senators trying to figure out how the nominee stands on the hot button

  • issues that the Supreme Court deals with. And that`s why

  • the Senators will vote yes or no.

  • Water fountains have been shut out at all public schools in Detroit, Michigan. The reason,

  • recent testing from fountains or sinks at

  • 24 schools in the district found that water in 16 of them had unacceptably high levels

  • of copper, lead or both. These metals can get into drinking

  • water when plumbing pipes that are made from them corrode. And it`s significant because

  • high level of copper and lead can cause a range of

  • health problems. They`ve been linked from everything from liver and kidney disease to

  • developmental delays and behavioral disorders.

  • There are more than 100 public schools in Detroit. They serve more than 47,000 students

  • and they still have water to drink it just comes from

  • bottles and coolers that officials have brought in. Water quality problems have been found

  • at 34 Detroit schools in total and tests are still being

  • carried out at 50 other schools. Detroit`s Water Department says the schools old plumbing

  • systems are responsible and that the water problems do

  • not extend to other parts of the city.

  • It also says there are no lead pipes that connect the schools plumbing so what might

  • have caused the high levels of lead and copper officials haven`t

  • said yet. Detroit isn`t the only part of Michigan to deal with water problems though. A long

  • term crisis in the city of Flint, about an hours

  • drive northwest of Detroit involved dangerously high levels of lead.

  • Facing down their challenges. Keeping their chin up when things don`t look good. Reaching

  • out to help others or help inspire them. These are some of

  • the attributes of a positive athlete and Haley Johnson seems to have all of them. The Wisconsin

  • soccer player is a great addition to our new series on

  • "Stand Out Young Athletes from Across America".

  • Soccer`s like the one thing I love doing. Like if I have a bad day I want to go play

  • soccer. I`m bored.

  • I want to go play soccer.

  • Her high school career has been a just - - just a rollercoaster. I think coming in as a Freshman,

  • you don`t know what to

  • expect and I think she put out - - she has just a phenomenal year.

  • And then we go into her Junior year, (inaudible) say hey, things aren`t going like I wanted

  • to. I can`t catch my breath.

  • I was really struggling. I was finishing last in sprints. It`s not normal. I think there`s

  • something wrong.

  • We took her for testing. When the doctor put up the x-ray she showed us the white mass

  • on the x-ray. The doctor, you know,

  • wanted to slow us down but that cancer was one of the - - one of the things they were

  • trying to rule out at that time.

  • I was very scared when I heard that word. Shocked. Yes, I did not know what to do.

  • It was probably one of the longest five hours of your life. Because you`re almost like - - you`re

  • thinking the worst case

  • scenario. I try not to - - get emotional.

  • I`ve never seen my dad like really scared, but you could tell he was like - - extremely

  • scared. They were worried. They told me that it

  • was benign. So that was like the biggest relief.

  • And then they tell you, hey it`s good news. We can do surgery on this. It`s not cancer

  • and all of a sudden it`s like, surgery,

  • hey it`s a great thing.

  • She had the surgery on Tuesday, came home on Friday. I mean, less than a week after

  • having the tumor and her chest cracked, she`s

  • at our practice to support her teammates. That`s the kind of kid she is.

  • I always wanted to be up and doing stuff. So, I mean, I can walk, right? Why not take

  • a ball with me, so I was just walk around the

  • neighborhood with the ball.

  • My neighbor came up to me and said hey, you know I saw Haley out jogging around the block

  • dribbling. And right away, I mean, this

  • is like, just like, two weeks after the surgery and I know she was driven and right away,

  • I`m like, wait, what?

  • Literally six weeks after the surgery, she was out on the field for us and playing.

  • I can remember that first game back and she actually scored the first goal for her team.

  • She was asked to speak at her

  • elementary school. She took a very difficult situation and tried to give back and help

  • others.

  • I`ve learned that you can`t control what happens to you but you can control how you react to

  • it.

  • She did something that - - she`s just amazing. And I`m just incredibly proud of her and I

  • can`t wait to see everything else she`s

  • going to do with that driven behavior and attitude.

  • I learned so much working on this show. For instance in Utah, this is how the Division

  • of Wildlife Resources stocks high mountain lakes

  • with fish. They put them on a plane, fly low over the lakes and drop them in. More than

  • 200 lakes are stocked this way each year. Officials say at

  • least 95 percent of the fish survive the drop because they`re so small that they fall to

  • the lakes like leaves. They also say this is better than the

  • old fashioned way of putting fish in metal milk cans and using cars and horses to get

  • to the lakes.

  • I bet the first time this was proposed it was like "bait" for skeptics. You can hear

  • someone "casting" the idea and another giving "biting"

  • criticism like yeah, right when fish "fly". But considering the "scales" of the operation

  • now that it`s in the "swim" of things, what`s not to

  • "lake". And make sure they`re fully stocked and it "stocks" up another edition of CNN

  • 10. I`m Carl Azuz.

Broadcasting from the CNN Center in Atlanta, Georgia, I`m Carl Azuz. Welcome to the show.

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

B1 中級 美國腔

中新網10年9月4日電 (CNN 10 September 4, 2018)

  • 83 1
    VoiceTube 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
影片單字