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  • UNIDENTIFIED CHILDREN: We are Big Blue.

  • UNIDENTIFIED CHILDREN: Attention to CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • UNIDENTIFIED GIL: Back to you, Carl.

  • AZUZ: Big thanks to Big Blue and to those students at Hamilton High for getting a starter today.

  • Yesterday, we explained a little bit about the United Nations General Assembly,

  • it`s annual meeting that`s happening this week in New York City.

  • Leaders and representatives from around the world have come to the United Nations headquarters.

  • They all get to make speeches to the General Assembly about issues they think deserve the U.N.`s attention.

  • President Obama spoke yesterday morning.

  • This is part of a president`s role as America`s chief diplomat, speaking on behalf of the country about international issues.

  • President Obama talked about the civil war in Syria, the recent economic struggles in the U.S. and overseas.

  • He also focused on Iran.

  • In yesterday`s show we discussed the decades of tension between the U.S. and Iran.

  • In his speech, President Obama talked about the possibility of the countries finding common ground.

  • BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: The roadblocks may prove to be too great.

  • But I firmly believe the diplomatic path must be tested.

  • From all the status quo we`ll only deepen Iran` isolation.

  • Iran`s genuine commitment to go down a different path will be good for the region and the world.

  • And we`ll help the Iranian people meet their extraordinary potential in commerce, in culture, in science and education.

  • AZUZ: Here are five things to know about a possible U.S. government shutdown.

  • Number one, it`s up to Congress and the president to work this out.

  • Congress has the job of passing spending bills that fund the U.S. government.

  • And the president signs those bills in the law.

  • The government`s financial year starts now next week, that`s why the deadline is October 1st.

  • Two, President Obama`s health care reform law: the Affordable Care Act or Obamacare factors in.

  • Recent polls indicate public support for Obamacare is weakening.

  • The Republican-led House of Representatives has voted to fund the government,

  • but only if the health law is defunded, effectively killed.

  • Neither the Democratic-led Senate nor the president will go for that.

  • So, someone will have to compromise on Obamacare to avoid a shutdown.

  • Three, this wouldn`t be the first time the government has shut down.

  • The last two times were in the 1990s, one of them lasting 21 days.

  • It was the longest shutdown in American history.

  • Four, many Americans, though, maybe not everyone would notice.

  • Some government workers would be furloughed, forced to take time off without pay.

  • Vacation plans for millions would change because national parks and museums like the Smithsonian would be closed,

  • and Americans wouldn`t be able to get passports or certain government loans until the shutdown ended.

  • The government workers considered essential, the military, the FBI, air traffic control, the TSA, they`ll all stay on duty.

  • Government medical coverage, Medicare or Medicaid would still be there for those who need it.

  • And you`ll still get snail mail.

  • Postal delivery wouldn`t change.

  • Five, the economic impact.

  • It really depends on how long a shutdown would last:

  • a few days likely wouldn`t have much impact.

  • But a few weeks could make a dent in gross domestic product, and in a fragile economy, that could hurt.

  • An update for you now from Kenya.

  • We`ve been reporting on a terrorist attack at the shopping mall in the nation`s capital city of Nairobi.

  • Yesterday, Kenya`s president said security forces had "ashamed and defeated the gunmen."

  • This all started on Saturday with the attack on the Westgate shopping mall.

  • Al Shabab said it was responsible.

  • This is a terrorist group based in Somalia, one of Kenya`s neighboring countries.

  • The attack turned into a standoff.

  • Then yesterday, security forces said they were making final sweeps through the mall.

  • Kenya`s president said three floors inside had collapsed, although he didn`t explain what caused that.

  • He described the country as bloodied, but unbowed.

  • ANNOUNCER: See if you can I.D. me.

  • I`m an American organization that was founded in the early 1900.

  • I have more than 1,000 members, mostly colleges and universities.

  • My president is Mark Emmert, and my headquarters is in Indianapolis.

  • I`m the NCAA, and I`m responsible for creating and enforcing rules for college athletics.

  • AZUZ: One set of rules the NCAA focuses on is the eligibility of student athletes, specifically their amateur status.

  • Many colleges athletes get scholarships, so playing sports can offset the cost of their education.

  • But they don`t actually get paid to play.

  • The group started by a former college players pushing for change.

  • Last weekend, it organized an on-field demonstration.

  • SARA GANIM, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Companies pay millions to advertise on athletes,

  • so some college players thought, why not send out our own message?

  • They grabbed sharpie Saturday and scribbled this on their armbands, towels and athletic tape.

  • The letters A, P, U. All players united.

  • 28 college football athletes from at least three major division one teams staged a polite unauthorized protest for NCAA reform.

  • RAMOGI HUMA, PRESIDENT, NATIONAL COLLEGE PLAYERS ASSOCIATION. Players really wanted to find a way to be more visible and vocal and to show unity.

  • GANIM: Ramogi Huma, a former UCLA linebacker and voice for reform, said it was the athletes` idea.

  • HUMA: The money is going to go to the places that always goes,

  • and we`re talking about salaries for coaches, athletic directors conference commissioners,

  • NSAA headquarters luxury boxes, you know, in the stadiums,

  • but they are not being directed to take care of players` medical expenses,

  • to invest in concussion research, brain trauma research to help protect the players that are generating the money.

  • And even education.

  • GANIM: We here all the time the argument: the college athletes should be paid,

  • since so many others cash in on what they do,

  • but that`s not their only complain.

  • They also say that if they get injured on the field,

  • there is no guarantee their medical expenses will be paid.

  • If they don`t graduate in four years, there is no guarantee they can still stay and get a degree.

  • Players at Northwestern, Georgia and Georgia Tech (inaudible) the All Players United pledge.

  • The NCAA seemed surprisingly understanding,

  • saying "As a higher education association, the NCAA supports open and civil debate regarding all aspects of college athletics.

  • But it didn`t seem like they were open to talking about it after the Georgia Tech game, where about ten players participated.

  • PAUL JOHNSON, HEAD COACH, GEORGIA TECH: Protest!

  • GANIM: This was head coach Paul Johnson`s response.

  • JOHNSON: Heck (inaudible) you do. That now (inaudible), we`ll talk to them about it.

  • GANIM: Two players from two different schools have said they wanted to talk to CNN about the pledge later pulled out of the interviews.

  • We caught up with one player who participated, even though Tim Handler tried to discourage us from talking about it.

  • JEREMIAH ATTAOCHU, DEFENSIVE END, GEORGIA TECH: I might get in some trouble --

  • I know the guys out there (inaudible) to Georgia Tech and,

  • you know, and don`t have (inaudible) and things like that.

  • So, you know, just, you know, looking out very ...

  • GANIM: Huma later told CNN that as far as he knows, no players have been disciplined for participating.

  • AZUZ: We`re talking about this on our blog, and if you`re 13 or older, we hope you will too.

  • There are benefits to being a student athlete, there are also potential risks.

  • Do you think college players should get paid?

  • The blog is up at cnnstudentnews.com.

  • Also, if you`re already on Facebook, come find us and like us.

  • We`re getting close to 100,000 likes, may be yours will put us over the top.

  • Facebook.com/cnnstudentnews.

  • We had a bunch of states represented on our "Roll Call" so far this school year.

  • Today, we are adding three more to the map --

  • starting in the Northeast, where we`ve got the Torrington High radars from Torrington, Connecticut.

  • We also have our first school from the Dakotas, Rapid City High School and the Eagles from Rapid City, South Dakota

  • and the Mackay minors from Mackay, Idaho round out today`s roll call.

  • George Dennehy was born with a disability.

  • His birth parents gave him up for adoption, because they wanted him to have a better life.

  • GEORGE DENNEHY, MUSICIAN: I`d like to go around and tell people that anything`s possible,

  • and I don`t want to hear the words "I can`t."

  • AZUZ: George Dennehy found that better life through music.

  • He was born without arms, but as mom signed him up for music lessons when he was eight,

  • George eventually found his way to play the guitar, playing as you can see, with his feet.

  • Now, Dennehy travels the world sharing his music and his message of perseverance.

  • AZUZ: I`m Carl Azuz, and here`s a moose on the lose:

  • it`s running wild through the streets of one Colorado neighborhood.

  • Well, it actually doesn`t look that wild and it`s not really in the street, it`s definitely not running.

  • But there is no denying, this is a moose, and this is not where it`s supposed to be.

  • Authorities are making, too, bigger deal out of it.

  • They`re hoping it`ll take off without causing any problems.

  • I guess, in the meantime, the local residents will just have to make the moost of it.

  • As we hope for that here, we`re going to check out some more music from George Dennehy.

  • So, please enjoy that, enjoy the rest of your day.

  • END

UNIDENTIFIED CHILDREN: We are Big Blue.

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September 25, 2013 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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