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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: A court hearing connected to the Boston marathon terror bombings.

  • That is our lead story today.

  • Hello, everyone, welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS. My name is Carl Azuz.

  • Back in April, two bombs went off near the finish line of the Boston marathon.

  • Three people were killed, at least 264 others were injured.

  • The suspects are brothers, Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

  • They are also accused of killing a campus police officer in the days following the bombing.

  • Tamerlan was killed in the shootout with police.

  • Dzhokhar was arrested and charged with multiple crimes,

  • but yesterday`s court hearing was for two other people.

  • Dias Kadyrbayev, in the middle of this photo, and Azamat Tazhayakov to his left.

  • They are friends of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

  • They have been charged with obstructing justice and conspiracy to obstruct justice.

  • They weren`t involved in the actual bombing.

  • Authorities say they took items from Tsarnaev`s dorm room after the bombing, in order to hide them from investigators.

  • Yesterday`s hearing was an arraignment, when defendants are called to court to respond to the charges against them.

  • It only lasted four minutes.

  • The two defendants heard the charges against them, entered pleas of not guilty, and were led back out of the court.

  • Some survivors of a Florida sinkhole are saying a security guard saved lives.

  • It`s part of a resort near Disneyworld, crumbled into the ground Sunday night.

  • This is how Richard Shanley reacted.

  • RICHARD SHANLEY, SECURITY GUARD: I went door to door, just beating on the doors, trying to get people out, and making sure they were safe.

  • I went floor to floor, got everybody out, and at the time I got done, I really didn`t think about it.

  • I just got them out and then got out myself.

  • AZUZ: Everyone in the building made it out safely, no injuries, but that`s not always how things work out with sinkholes.

  • Here`s CNN`s John Berman.

  • JOHN BERMAN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: That`s what a sinkhole sounds like, swallowing the summer bay resort early Monday morning.

  • The 60-foot wide crater in Claremont, Florida, just the latest incident in this year`s string of sinkholes across the country.

  • In July, 60-year-old Pamela Knox plummeted into a nearly 20-foot sinkhole, while driving on a busy Toledo, Ohio street.

  • But some have not been so lucky.

  • In February, a sinkhole opened up underneath a suburban Tampa home,

  • killing 36-year-old Jeff Bush, who was sleeping in his bedroom.

  • This is how sinkholes are formed.

  • A cavity slowly develops in the limestone bedrock.

  • Over time, it widens, eventually breaking the surface.

  • Then, the clay and sand above collapse into the hole, swallowing everything in its path.

  • Repairs can be costly.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: See if you can ID me.

  • I`m part of the U.S. government whose members serve lifetime terms.

  • I`ve had 112 total members.

  • Right now I have nine.

  • Some of my famous alumni include Thurgood Marshall, Sandra Day O`Connor, and William Taft.

  • I`m the U.S. Supreme Court, the top of the U.S. judicial branch of government.

  • AZUZ: The U.S. Supreme Court is responsible for interpreting laws.

  • The nine justices, one chief and eight associate justices, rule on whether or not laws and government actions violate the U.S. Constitution.

  • The decision that the Supreme Court justices make can have a direct impact on our lives.

  • Today we are checking out some of the court`s rulings from its most recent session.

  • It`s a part of our week-long look back at summer news stories.

  • AZUZ: The U.S. Supreme Court starts its annual session in October,

  • but some of the court`s decisions don`t come out until late June or July,

  • after most of you started your summer break.

  • So here is a quick recap of some of the bigger rulings from the most recent Supreme Court session.

  • First up, a case that focused on whether colleges and universities can take a prospective student`s race into account when making admission decisions.

  • The majority of Supreme Court justices ruled that schools can use race in the admissions process,

  • but only in limited ways that must stand up against a close legal review.

  • The justices said those standards were not applied correctly by lower courts in this particular case.

  • So it was sent back to a lower court for further review.

  • Next, a case about the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

  • It was designed to give African-Americans equal voting access.

  • Part of the law said certain states and counties had to get the federal government`s approval

  • before making any changes to voting laws or regulations.

  • Five of the Supreme Court justices declared that rule is unconstitutional.

  • Congress must now revise the law, but states and counties can change their laws without getting the U.S. government`s permission.

  • And finally, two Supreme Court cases on the issue of same-sex marriage.

  • Both of these decisions were 5-4 rulings.

  • In the first case, the majority of justices found that same-sex couples who were married legally

  • had the same right to the same federal benefits as heterosexual couples.

  • The other case had to do with same-sex marriage in California.

  • It was legal there until a ban, called Proposition 8, was passed by voters.

  • A lawsuit let a lower court to declare Proposition 8 unconstitutional.

  • The U.S. Supreme Court ruling upheld that decision,

  • clearing the way for gay and lesbian couples to start getting married again in California.

  • The Supreme Court`s ruling only applies to California.

  • The court did not offer a decision about same-sex marriage that would apply to all 50 states.

  • AZUZ: You`ve seen some of the new stuff we have in our show this year.

  • Teachers, this applies to our website too.

  • When you go to cnnstudentnews.com, click on the box that says, "teaching tools."

  • Every day, that`s where you`ll find the transcript of our program, our enhanced daily curriculum with the media literacy question of the day.

  • We`ve got a printable version of the curriculum too.

  • Plus, our downloadable maps and a place for new teachers to comment on the day`s show.

  • It`s a one-stop shop for all the great free resources you expect from us.

  • Check it out. CNNstudentnews.com.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s time for the shoutout.

  • About how fast is the speed of sound?

  • If you think you know it, then shout it out.

  • Is it around 250, 580, 760 or 1,500 miles per hour?

  • You`ve got three seconds, go.

  • At sea level, the speed of sound is about 760 miles per hour.

  • That is your answer and that`s your shoutout.

  • AZUZ: There are vehicles, like some fighter jets, that travel faster than the speed of sound.

  • But most folks, you and I, don`t have access to them.

  • A billionaire who is involved in private space travel and electric cars wants to change that.

  • These are designs for something called the Hyperloop.

  • Elon Musk, a billionaire, says it can get from San Francisco to Los Angeles in 30 minutes.

  • It would move at around the speed of sound, using electric motors and air pressure to zip back and forth through a tube.

  • Musk admits there are challenges, but the idea has people talking.

  • ELON MUSK, BILLIONAIRE: It`s a cross between a Concord, a rail gun, and an air hockey table.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It sounds like something out of the cartoon show, "The Jetsons."

  • A space age method of transport that some say can get you from New York to LA in less than an hour.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Sort of like an enclosed tube, and we just blast air through that,

  • kind of like, you know, those old-school mail systems where they stuff the package up and it gets sucked up,

  • and it`s going to be launched out of this rail gun, boom, you`re off. 600 miles per hour.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: He`s either a visionary, or he`s barking mad, what he`s come up with.

  • But the core of this is a tube that would be on pillars from Los Angeles to San Francisco,

  • and inside there would be capsule cars that would be rocketed forward.

  • Elon Musk basically says that this is the way of the future.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It is a voice that is needed to move us forward.

  • Somebody that says, you know, these old ways aren`t working.

  • Old transit is kind of boring, it`s inefficient. Why don`t we leapfrog all that with something radical.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: If billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk has his way, you will be able to do this in another 7 to 10 years.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I don`t think we`re going to be seeing this really any time soon.

  • I think there are other technologies that could dramatically change the way we travel that are going to be available far sooner than anything like this.

  • Autonomous vehicles, commonly called self- driving cars, or driverless cars.

  • You have a number of companies such as Google, Volkswagen and Bosch (ph).

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: But in the real world, there will be challenges.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re going to have some serious not in my backyard problems.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: To reduce the resistance and the friction, the air would be pumped from the front to the bottom of the capsule,

  • which would essentially cause it to float on compressed air, so just think of an air hockey table, and that is the kind of effect that you get there.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: So I am imagining my face, I go, ooh, is this going to be something I want to ride on?

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I think so. Because in a controlled environment, speed itself does not actually impact human health.

  • AZUZ: Well, the Hyperloop might sound as unbelievable as a car that drives across the water.

  • There it is. Amazing amphibious automobiles.

  • They certainly made some waves as they came floating down the Chicago River last week.

  • Look like cars, but move like jetskis.

  • That`s because they are jetskis. They just have a car`s body on top.

  • The fakeout might deserve some chassis-tisement (ph), but it was all a marketing stunt anyway, so don`t let it drive you nuts.

  • After all, it was a wheelie (ph) clever scheme.

  • Time for us to take a break. We`ll be back tomorrow. For CNN STUDENT NEWS, I am Carl Azuz.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: A court hearing connected to the Boston marathon terror bombings.

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August 14, 2013 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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