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  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • SPEAKER 1: Yep.

  • That's me on a pig hunt in Hawaii.

  • But this isn't exactly how it looks.

  • SPEAKER 2: Pig right there.

  • SPEAKER 1: I'm actually doing this to save coral reefs.

  • Let me explain.

  • I came to the Big Island of Hawaii

  • to understand how feral pigs along with climate change

  • are contributing to the destruction of coral reefs

  • here.

  • [INAUDIBLE]

  • CHAD WIGGINS: What's happening is

  • the pigs are up Mauka in the forest,

  • and they're foraging up there for worms and for snails.

  • And so they dig up the soil.

  • Once the rains come, intermittently, and flood

  • these streams, that's when we get a big pulse of sediment

  • out onto the reed.

  • As soon as sediment covers the coral,

  • the coral typically dies.

  • If it's smothered, it can't get sunlight.

  • It can't get oxygen. It can't get nutrients and it's dead.

  • If the coral manages to survive, every time the waves comes,

  • it gets re-suspended and the sediment

  • continues to do damage, sometimes for decades.

  • KYLE THIERMANN: Last year, the Big Island of Hawaii

  • experienced the largest coral bleaching

  • event in recorded history.

  • Right now, I'm on a boat with scientists

  • from the division of aquatic resources and NOAA

  • to survey the current state of coral.

  • Even to my untrained eye, I can see that the decaying

  • coral had lost their vibrancy.

  • And there were significantly fewer fish.

  • LINDSEY KRAMER: To actually see these huge multi hundred

  • or many hundreds of year old colonies

  • completely bleached and stressed and with that good chance

  • that they weren't going to survive,

  • it was really devastating.

  • Really awful to see.

  • And I think, that was the first time,

  • for me, that the magnitude of this was obvious.

  • That we might not see recovery from this event

  • in our lifetimes.

  • DR. JAMIE GOVE: Coral reefs are important for a number

  • of reasons.

  • There's no other ecosystem on this planet that

  • occupies such a small geographic area

  • but it has more forms of life than coral reef ecosystems.

  • There are unprecedented.

  • One in four of all marine organisms

  • live in association with coral reefs

  • but they occupy less than 1/10 of 1% of the sea floor.

  • SPEAKER 1: This is Dr. Jamie Gove, a research oceanographer

  • for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

  • He also lets me sleep on his couch.

  • DR. JAMIE GOVE: So without coral reefs,

  • all of those waves and storms and currents

  • would reach shore and wreak havoc

  • on all of the shoreline property that we saw today,

  • among other things.

  • SPEAKER 1: Since feral pigs are contributing

  • to the damage we saw underwater, I met up with Chad back

  • on dry land to see how fencing is

  • helping to control the problem.

  • CHAD WIGGINS: Once a fence is constructed in a priority area

  • where you want to conserve the forest or retain sediment,

  • hunters can come in and reduce the populations.

  • SPEAKER 1: It's important to note

  • that the eradication of feral pigs is not the goal here.

  • In fact, pigs are extremely significant to the islands.

  • Historically and culturally.

  • CHAD WIGGINS: When pigs and goats were dropped off

  • by Captain Cook in 1778, they found paradise here.

  • Domestic pig bread with the Polynesian pig

  • which was already here at the time of the arrival.

  • The facts that pigs were here when Captain Cook arrived,

  • means that the Polynesians valued

  • them enough to bring them across the ocean to Hawaii

  • and cultivate them.

  • SPEAKER 1: And pigs are still highly valued by locals here.

  • The problem is, their population has exploded.

  • You would have to remove 70% of the current pig population

  • each year to keep them under control,

  • which is why people like Justin Lee and Wayne [? Cypriano ?]

  • are still hunting pigs.

  • JUSTIN LEE: Without hunters, without people

  • regulating the numbers, Hawaii as we

  • know it will never be the same.

  • All of the useful meat from this animal

  • is going to be made into appetizers at a baby first luau

  • or a wedding.

  • It will be food on the table, not just for our family

  • but for a lot of different families.

  • SPEAKER 1: And Justin makes a good argument,

  • which is why I found myself on this hunt.

  • Climate change is endangering coral reefs all over the world.

  • And our ability to deal with land based intox,

  • like feral pig, could make the difference

  • in the survival of these reefs.

  • Are you aware of other invasive species impacting

  • the environment where you live?

  • Let us know in the comments below.

  • And check out this next episode on another island in Hawaii

  • where one company is growing algae to power airplanes

  • and more.

  • SPEAKER 3: So this is the dried algae product.

  • After we dry it, we grind up into powder.

  • And then we extract the oil out of it.

  • That oil is then refined into diesel fuel or jet fuel.

  • The fuel that we're producing is exactly the same

  • in terms of performance as gasoline or diesel or jet.

  • It's just a lot cleaner.

  • SPEAKER 1: Thanks for washing Seeker Stories

  • and be sure to subscribe for new videos every week.

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獵殺野生豬可拯救夏威夷的珊瑚礁 (Hunting Wild Pigs Could Save Hawaii's Coral Reefs)

  • 70 1
    邱昱盛 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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