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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: A king-size conundrum ruins ruined, twins who are both first,

  • that`s all coming up at this Thursday edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • We start with a threat of severe weather.

  • The tropical cyclone, which is the same kind of storm as a hurricane,

  • and the United Nations agency says more than 8 million people in Bangladesh and Myanmar could be in danger from this one.

  • The storm is moving through the Gulf of Bengal.

  • Forecasters think it will hit land late today early Friday.

  • When it does, it`s expected to bring strong winds and very heavy rain.

  • Authorities in aid groups are trying to help people prepare before this thing hits.

  • One official says it`s really a race against time.

  • These storms have different names, based on what part of the world they are in.

  • Ivan Cabrera has more on that and explains some of the science behind them.

  • IVAN CABRERA, METEOROLOGIST: When tropical cyclone is an area of low pressure that forms in the tropical regions of the world.

  • Cyclones are actually very important, even though, of course, they can be deadly,

  • they help essentially balance out the temperature across the globe.

  • They are an equalizer, so they take the heat energy from the tropics

  • and they translate that where we need it into the colder climates.

  • The generic term for it is a tropical cyclone.

  • That can refer to any cyclone that has a closed center circulation anywhere in the world,

  • like in the Atlantic when it gets strong enough to a certain wind speed, we call them hurricanes.

  • But if you`re in the western Pacific, a hurricane is called the typhoon.

  • There is no difference between a hurricane and a typhoon except in the name.

  • They`re both tropical cyclones.

  • AZUZ: Next up today: anger.

  • It`s about the materials being used to build the roads, specifically where these materials came from.

  • A pyramid.

  • This happened in the Central American country of Belize.

  • The northern part of this nation was home to Mayan civilizations thousands of years ago.

  • Those civilizations included pyramids that looked like this one,

  • some of them are still standing, like one that was the center of a settlement around 250 B.C.

  • The pyramid was more than 60 feet tall.

  • I say was.

  • This is what`s left of that Mayan pyramid.

  • Someone came in with bulldozers and destroyed it,

  • so they could use the limestone from the pyramid as road building material.

  • The pyramid was on private land, but there are laws in Belize that protect these ancient ruins.

  • Local officials says whoever`s responsible should be prosecuted.

  • A local archeologist called the pyramid`s destruction an incredible display of ignorance.

  • Predicting a volcanic eruption has never been an exact science.

  • Otherwise, things might have turned out differently in Pompei.

  • Today, volcanologists can use instruments to monitor a mountain,

  • they can study its eruptive history, they can keep watch on trimmers in the ground around it.

  • But one sure fire sign the volcano is up to something, it starts spewing lava.

  • An that`s what not one, but two volcanoes in Alaska are doing.

  • Scientists are saying that with little or no warning, they could explode.

  • Both the Pavlof and Cleveland volcanoes are in the Aleutian Islands, off the southwest coast of Alaska.

  • And in the case of the Cleveland volcano,

  • there are no ground instruments to monitor what`s going on, because of budget cuts,

  • full scale eruptions would threaten air space.

  • An estimated 90 percent of air freight that travels from Asia to Europe and North America flies near Alaska.

  • But these volcanoes aren`t a major threat to people on the ground, because there aren`t many people on the ground there.

  • What is a threat to people, a massive mountain in Mexico.

  • The Popocatepetl Volcano has been spewing ash and molten rocks in recent days.

  • Since it`s only 40 miles from Mexico City,

  • authorities are planning evacuation routes and shelters for people nearby, in case it blows its top.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Today`s first "Shoutout" goes out to Mrs. Hernandez` freshman seminar at East River High School in Orlando, Florida.

  • What team played in Minneapolis, Minnesota during the NBA`s first season.

  • Was it the Hawks, Lakers, Warriors or Timberwolves.

  • You`ve got three second, go!

  • The Timberwolves may be Minnesota`s team now.

  • But when the NBA started, the Lakers were playing the Minneapolis.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your "Shoutout;"

  • ZUZ: The teams` name comes from Minnesota`s nickname, Land of 10,000 Lakes.

  • Lakers moved to L.A in 1960.

  • They`re not the only sports franchise that has relocated, and there could be more.

  • The NBA is considering moving the Sacramento Kings to Seattle, a city that lost its NBA team five years ago.

  • Casey Wian explores this tale of two cities starting in Seattle.

  • CASEY WIAN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Fans are rowing to bring the NBA back and the mayor is on board.

  • MAYOR MICHAEL MCGINN, SEATTLE: We`ve got a great city for NBA basketball,

  • one of the largest markets in the country, we got a great (inaudible) team.

  • We have political support and most of all, we got the fan support.

  • WIAN: Back in Sacramento, the mayor is former NBA start Kevin Johnson,

  • an all-start point guard, no point man for the city`s efforts to keep the Kings under local ownership.

  • MAYOR KEVIN JOHNSON, SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA: We`ve always said that it`s bigger than basketball,

  • so not only would we keep the thousand jobs that the Kings have here,

  • it also ties into a billion dollar economic development with a new arena downtown.

  • Those are very tangible and very specific.

  • WIAN: One advantage for Sacramento, the Kings are the only game in town,

  • there is no competition for fans from overlapping Major League Baseball of NFL seasons.

  • But that small size can be a disadvantage.

  • Sacramento is only the number 20 U.S. television market,

  • and its arena is sponsored by a local mattress chain.

  • Seattle`s Ownership Group includes the CEO of Microsoft and the manager of a multi-billion dollar hedge fund.

  • They`re so well financed, that when the NBA`s relocation committee recommended last month to deny the move to Seattle,

  • they simply raised their offer by $75 million.

  • SHAWN KEMP, FORMER SEATTLE SUPERSONIC: Yeah, definitely.

  • WIAN: Former Supersonic Shawn Camp owns a restaurant near the proposed Seattle arena.

  • KEMP: It`s not about money,

  • I think we deserve another shot simply because we cared about the little things around this area, it was about to -- like I said, the community relation,

  • so it was about doing and being a part of something.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Let me say this to Seattle: great city, great sports (inaudible), great fans, great ownership group,

  • they deserve a basketball team - just not us.

  • WIAN: Whatever the NBA decides, there`s a good change the outcome won`t be final until there`s a ruling in a non-basketball court.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Today`s "Shoutout Extra Credit" goes out to Mrs. Duvall`s political science class at North Bullitt High School in Shepherdsville, Kentucky.

  • What piece of music is traditionally played at academic graduations?

  • Is it Ode to Joy, Auld Lang Syne, Pomp and Circumstance or Pachebel`s Canon.

  • Rewind the clock to three seconds, and go!

  • That traditional graduation march is Pomp and Circumstance.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your "Shoutout Extra Credit."

  • AZUZ: Of course, "Pump and Circumstance" one of the traditions that comes with graduation ceremonies wearing caps and gowns also.

  • And the naming of the valedictorian, the top student in the class.

  • As (inaudible) the college here in Atlanta, there are two valedictorians this year,

  • and Erin Coleman from affiliate WSB explains,

  • these students have a lot more in common than just their GPAs.

  • ERIN COLEMAN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Kristie and Kirstie Bronner,

  • that`s Kristie on the right of your screen, Kirstie on the left.

  • They are identical twins, with an identical GPA.

  • KIRSTIE BRONNER, SPELMAN COLLEGE CO-VALEDICTORIAN: Before we came to college, we prayed that we would keep (inaudible) all the way through.

  • I don`t think that we really ever expected it.

  • KRISTIE BRONNER, SPELMAN COLLEGE CO-VALEDICTORIAN: You can have strength together.

  • COLEMAN: The Spelman College seniors will graduate in a matter of days.

  • They say they worked hard, so hard at first they made themselves sick, but eventually ...

  • KRISTIE BRONNER: We learned how to have a balance to life and meant to be able to appreciate a journey of college and be more healthy and be more happy.

  • KIRSTIE BRONNER: Every semester we learned something news about life, things that we can apply to life, things that we apply to school.

  • COLEMAN: They both majored in music, and just wait till you hear them sing.

  • KRISTIE BRONNER: You don`t have to be the smartest, you don`t have to be the one who came in with a prior knowledge to be the one to succeed.

  • COLEMAN: Life lessons from two of Spelman`s shiny young women, who are sharing the spotlight.

  • AZUZ: All right. Before we go, the worst pool party ever.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: There`s people in this backyard, just south of the bear (ph) here.

  • And there`s the bear, so one property away,

  • this is going to be very scary for those people if that bear continues over that fence,

  • and it looks like he indeed is going that way.

  • We have trees, we`re going to try to get around this (ph) move around -- house, -- and here are those people.

  • Look at the reaction, they are out of here.

  • There`s a bear and they are running for their lives, into the house, smart move and here`s another person.

  • He`s out of here.

  • AZUZ: Everyone got away from the animals safely, but just barely.

  • To avoid this in the future, they can hire a lookout, you know, a cub scout,

  • or they can do it by themselves by pulling their resources.

  • For CNN STUDENT NEWS, I`m Carl Azuz, have a great day.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: A king-size conundrum ruins ruined, twins who are both first,

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May 16, 2013 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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