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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: How much sleep should we get and why aren`t we getting it?

  • Some ABC`s and Z`s in just a few minutes. First up today, Wall Street.

  • Yesterday, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed the day above 15,000.

  • That`s significant, but why?

  • But for starters, it`s never happened before.

  • And that number, 15,000 comes from a complicated formula based on 30 stocks that are part of the Dow Jones Average.

  • Higher number equals higher value for those stocks.

  • Those companies represent a variety of industries.

  • The Dow gives an idea of how the stock market is doing and the stock market is one indicator how the U.S. economy is doing.

  • So, when the Dow reaches a new record, it means investors are feeling more positive, experts seeing this as a sign that the U.S. economy is improving.

  • Next, President Obama welcomes South Korean president Park Geun-Hye to the White House yesterday.

  • This is her first visit to the United States as South Korea`s leader.

  • The countries have been allies for decades, and as part of that relationship, the two countries run joined military exercises every year.

  • A major part of this year`s exercises wrapped up last week.

  • Something else the U.S. and South Korean have in common - both countries have a tense relationship with North Korea.

  • That country recently made threats against South Korea and the U.S.

  • The tension has calmed down a little bit, but North Korean gave a new warning this week about military drills happening off the West Coast of the Korean Peninsula.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: See, if you can I.D me:

  • I`m a country that has one of the world`s only communist governments.

  • I`m the fourth largest nation in size, but I have the world`s second largest economy.

  • I`m first when it comes to population.

  • I`m China, and I became the world`s second largest economy in 2010.

  • AZUZ: China took over that number two economic ranking because its economy grew.

  • It`s something you hear U.S. politicians talk a lot about economic growth.

  • Usually, it`s considered a good thing, when a country`s economy grows too much too quickly,

  • there`s a chance it can start supplying things that aren`t in demand.

  • Ivan Watson gives us one big example:

  • IVAN WATSON, CNN CORRESPONDENT: It`s May Day, a national holiday here in China.

  • And in this factory town, families are packed into this amusement park outside a big shopping mall,

  • all taking advantage of the day off to have a good time.

  • From the outside this place looks like a festive boomtown.

  • But the view inside is very, very different.

  • Take a look at this: this is the new South China Mall.

  • When it opened more than five years ago,

  • it was promoted as the world`s largest shopping mall, but look at it today.

  • The escalators are covered with sheet, the elevators are not even working and it is virtually deserted, a ghost mall, some people call it.

  • There are almost no shops open in this entire place.

  • In fact, it looks like there are very, very few retail tenants operating businesses here at all.

  • The ground is littered with garbage.

  • And it smells like a lot of people have been using this place as a giant public bathroom.

  • It`s here in this eerie urban landscape that we stumble across two Taiwanese businessmen who say the timing was bad for the new South China Mall.

  • NELSON WANG, CHANG SHENG CONSULTING (through translator): You can`t say just because you build it, it will work.

  • You have to have enough demand first.

  • WATSON: The businessmen say they`re negotiating a deal to turn the failed shopping mall into an office park.

  • It`s too early to say whether or not these Taiwanese businessmen will succeed in turning what was supposed to be a Venetian-inspired shopping experience into a profitable office center.

  • But it`s important to know, this is not the first ghost mall we`ve seen in China.

  • These are perhaps an example of what happens when an economy tries to grown too big too fast.

  • You`re bound to get some pretty big mistakes along the way.

  • Ivan Watson, CNN, Dongguan in southern China.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Today`s Shoutout goes out to Mr. Lowery`s homeroom at the Lucaya International School in Freeport, Bahamas.

  • Which of this refers to part of the sleep cycle.

  • You know what to do. Is it RAM, RYM, ROM, REM?

  • You`ve got three seconds, go.

  • REM stands for rapid eye movement. It happens during sleep when you`re dreaming.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your "Shoutout."

  • AZUZ: You need more sleep. You`ve heard your mother say that, and many folks have listened.

  • But according to a new survey, Americans, even really sleepy ones aren`t doing anything about it.

  • Well, wake up and smell some facts: the Centers for Disease Control has called not getting enough sleep a public health epidemic.

  • Why? Because those who don`t sleep enough are more likely to be depressed,

  • overweight, less productive and may simply don`t look as good as when they`re sleeping enough.

  • Don`t you want to be beautiful?

  • The Better Sleep Council reports that nearly half the people in America say they don`t get enough sleep,

  • but fewer than half of them take specific action to catch some Zs.

  • That could be because many simply don`t believe a lack of sleep is bad for you.

  • 45 percent of guys, for instance, say that people can learn to live with less sleep.

  • The council, a non- profit group supported by the mattress industry calls that a myth.

  • 80 percent of Americans say they get stressed or have trouble concentrating when they`re sleepy.

  • But fewer than 30 percent of them believe a lack of sleep can contribute to memory problems, heart problems or diabetes. It can.

  • So, how much sleep do we need?

  • For kids it`s ten to 11 hours a night, teenagers should aim for 8.5 hours or more, and adults seven and nine hours a night.

  • If you`re not serious about getting enough sleep, the council is hoping this will be a wake up call.

  • Our next story today. When a young person is diagnosed with cancer, it can mean treatments, tests, doctors` appointments.

  • For some families, just getting to the hospital is a struggle.

  • That`s where Richard Neris comes in.

  • What he is doing in his community is why he is one this year`s CNN heroes.

  • RICHARD NARES: I know what those families are going through.

  • NARES: Cars coming in.

  • It is extremely difficult.

  • My son, he was diagnosed with cancer.

  • It was such a horrifying time.

  • We were fortunate we had rides to the hospital to bring Emilio.

  • And many of families don`t have that support.

  • Good morning!

  • We find out that many of them were missing appointments.

  • My name is Richard Nares.

  • No child should miss their cancer treatment due to lack of transportation.

  • There you go.

  • OK.

  • We give over 2,000 rides a year.

  • For these cancer patients it`s 120 miles.

  • "Ride with Emilio" plays an important part of their treatment.

  • We get them here in a nice, clean environment and on time.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We live here. It`s everything.

  • Treatment. We want to fight.

  • We`re in this together.

  • It`s all I care right now, my daughter`s life.

  • NARES: When you`re fighting for your child`s life, nothing else matters.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: They pick us up in the morning, and give us a ride back.

  • They`ll help us every step of the way.

  • NARES: 70 percent of our families are Spanish-speaking.

  • Having invited more stuff is extremely important.

  • I feel like it`s my obligation to help them navigate the system.

  • Take a care of yourself.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yeah.

  • NARES: from the someone who`s been there.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Thank you.

  • NARES: Even though he`s passed away almost 13 years,

  • he`s the main force of this, and I feel that I`m the right person to help.

  • UNIDENTIFIED CHILD: Cheese!

  • AZUZ: Teacher appreciation.

  • If you`re on Facebook, you can talk about your favorite teachers most memorable lessons.

  • Some of you have been sending us I-reports.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Hi, I`m Tiffany.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I`m Hannah.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Our teacher is Mrs. Johnson of Pendleton High School in Pendleton, Oregon.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: He`s most likely to teach a future president, thanks for being such a great teacher.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: See you in class.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Hi, CNN. I`m homeschooled and I`d like to recognize my mom as the most dedicated teacher.

  • Or you can say, my mom is the most amazing mentor ever.

  • AZUZ: Great job, you all! Our last story today: it`s normal for people to make requests of their government.

  • These fourth graders got an immediate response:

  • they were visiting New Jersey Governor Chris Christie when someone spotted a spider on the governor`s desk.

  • Bam! We don`t know if the students actually asked Governor Christie to address the arachnoid,

  • he might have take action into his own hand, but he did sent out the video later on,

  • so it seems like he was happy to engage in a little smack talk.

  • It sounds (inaudible) are bugged out. I hope you enjoy the rest of your day. Bye now.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: How much sleep should we get and why aren`t we getting it?

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May 8, 2013 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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