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  • Great to see you this Monday November, 23rd.

  • I'm Carl Azuz for CNN Student News.

  • First up, Mali is a republic in West Africa, population about 17 million.

  • They're under a state of emergency and observing three days

  • of national mourning following a terrorist attack in the capital of Bamako.

  • The United Nations says two or three attackers

  • entered a hotel there on Friday and started shooting.

  • By the time international police forces had blocked off the area and rushed in,

  • ending the attack, at least 22 people had been killed.

  • This terrorist act was not blamed on the ISIS group

  • that targeted Paris on November 13th.

  • Two other militant Islamist groups,

  • one of them affiliated with Al Qaeda said they were responsible.

  • Mali has struggled with Islamist militants for years.

  • The instability caused by a military coup in 2012,

  • allowed terror groups to take control of territory in northern Mali.

  • The hotel where the attack happened was hosting international peace talks at the time.

  • The U. N. official says the terrorists who did it,

  • don't want to see peace in Mali.

  • Meantime in Europe, Belgium is on guard against terrorism.

  • French officials say the recent attacks in Paris,

  • which killed 130 people, were planned in Belgium.

  • A French citizen who grew up in Belgium and is suspected

  • in those attacks is on the run.

  • And the capital is under its highest terrorism alert level.

  • The threat level, level four, continues here in Brussels,

  • now into its second day, and it doesn't appear to be easing.

  • It was just announced that the metro will remained closed

  • the rest of this day, Sunday, as authorities meet late this afternoon

  • to determine whether or not they can lift all the restrictions

  • they have placed on life here in Brussels.

  • This all developed Friday night when the Prime Minister announced

  • a new serious and imminent threat,

  • something akin to what happened in Paris,

  • that had him ask for the closing down of all concerts,

  • restaurants, bars, anywhere where people gather.

  • All of this is taking place at the same time that

  • Belgium officials are still trying to track down that

  • eighth elusive attacker Salah Abdeslam who is from Belgium.

  • Threat level continues here.

  • People going on with their lives as best as they can

  • while keeping a wary eye on anything that looks suspicious.

  • Drew Griffin, CNN, Brussels.

  • The ISIS terrorist group has threatened other cities including some in the U. S .,

  • so police will be especially watchful as Americans travel

  • for the Thanksgiving holiday.

  • The triple A driving group is predicting that 47 million Americans,

  • the most since 2007, will be behind the wheel at some point this week.

  • The navigation app Ways says the best time to drive to avoid traffic

  • is on Thanksgiving itself, in the morning or the evening.

  • But increased security will probably be more noticeable

  • for those who choose to fly.

  • Millions of passengers will pack onto planes to kick off the holiday travel season.

  • From now until December 1st,

  • it's estimated a total 25 million people will fly on U. S. airlines,

  • 3 % more than last year.

  • This, as airports around the country remain on high alert.

  • TSA has to be a lot more thorough now because of all these concerns.

  • It's pretty simple mathematics. In the end, it's going to take more time

  • to screen each person, and that is going to add up to longer lines.

  • Travelers should expect longer wait times as TSA

  • spends more time inspecting passengers and luggage.

  • Expect random checks, hand swabs to test for explosive residue,

  • and additional random checks at the gate.

  • Even pre- checked passengers may be required to remove their shoes and laptops.

  • Homeland Security has also called for expanded

  • screening of all items on aircraft leaving overseas airports

  • with direct flights to the United States.

  • There's no known specific threat to the U. S .,

  • but passenger planes remain a target for terrorists.

  • ISIS claimed this is the bomb that brought down a Russian passenger plane earlier this month.

  • That crash, along with the terrorist attacks in Paris,

  • have led to a climate where pilots and airlines are taking no chances.

  • The next aircraft on file is the emergency aircraft.

  • Two Air France flights were diverted after bomb threats were called in.

  • As a precautionary we are declaring an emergency.

  • It's a security issue.

  • And Thursday night a Spirit Airlines flight was forced to

  • make an emergency landing in Fort Lauderdale after another bomb threat.

  • They all proved to be hoaxes.

  • But heightened airport security, paired with more holiday travelers,

  • will likely lead to long waits At America's airports.

  • Everybody understands that the first priority is to be safe.

  • Now, especially with the new security concerns,

  • you're really more than ever going to want to get to the airport early.

  • The other factor that could impact wait times,

  • TSA's full- time airport security staffing levels

  • have steadily decreased due to a shrinking budget.

  • Rene Marsh, CNN Washington.

  • Of course weather plays a part too in Thanksgiving travel,

  • and except for the Pacific Northwest,

  • forecasters are predicting decent Thanksgiving weather for most of the U. S ..

  • Should be a welcome relief to travelers in Chicago, Illinois

  • where hundreds of flights were canceled over the weekend.

  • The season's first big snow storm arrived.

  • Some parts of the northern U. S. were buried under as much as 20 inches of snow.

  • There were problems for drivers as well with freezing rain

  • and sleet making things dangerous on the roads.

  • It all comes down to the temperature,

  • at different levels of the atmosphere.

  • Take freezing rain for example.

  • You start with a snowflake high in the atmosphere.

  • It will enter a warm layer, temperatures above freezing.

  • That will cause the snowflake to melt and basically turn into a raindrop.

  • That warm layer is so thick,

  • the temperatures don't get below freezing until just above the surface,

  • and not enough time for that raindrop to freeze again.

  • So it freezes on everything it makes contact with.

  • Roads, bridges, power lines, tree branches, everything.

  • On the other hand, you have sleet.

  • The only difference is, that warm layer isn't so thick,

  • and the raindrop has enough time to freeze again.

  • That's why a lot of times you can hear sleet,

  • it sounds like ice hitting the surface, roads, cars, anything it touches.

  • Our producers pick schools for our roll call at cnnstudentnews. com.

  • We get thousands of requests, so please be patient.

  • We've been to Vicenza we've been to Livorno.

  • Today we're visiting Milan, in Northern Italy,

  • where the American school of Milan is watching.

  • To the capital of New Hampshire,

  • hello to the Blue Dukes of Rundlett Middle School.

  • Good to see you today in Concord.

  • And from Farmingdale, New Jersey, say hi to the Hornets.

  • Howell Middle School North rounds out our roll.

  • The Centers for Disease Control says an outbreak of salmonella

  • infections has sickened 838 people in 38 states since this summer.

  • Four have died.

  • The outbreak was linked to cucumbers imported from Mexico.

  • It's unlikely that any of them are still in food supply,

  • but if you've had cucumbers sitting in your fridge for a couple months,

  • you'll want to throw them out.

  • Salmonella is a bacteria that's not usually deadly but can make us violently ill.

  • Salmonella can contaminate foods in the field or

  • sometimes in the processing plant.

  • Sometimes salmonella can get into food in your own kitchen,

  • for example, if your cutting up chicken on one cutting board

  • and you don't clean it properly and then you cut up vegetables

  • that you're not going to cook. That's called cross- contamination.

  • Salmonella can also live on the bodies of animals

  • like reptiles or chickens.

  • So if you touch them and you don't wash your hands,

  • you could get yourself sick.

  • People usually get sick about 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food.

  • And symptoms include fever, diarrhea and abdominal cramps.

  • Each year in the United States 1. 2 million people

  • get sick from salmonella and 450 people die.

  • To keep yourself from getting sick from salmonella,

  • cook foods thoroughly, don't eat raw eggs, don't drink unpasteurized milk.

  • You might have heard the phrase don't spit into the wind.

  • And if you haven't you can probably figure out why you shouldn't do it.

  • But, who would've thought that kicking a soccer ball into the wind

  • would be such a threat to winning.

  • It carried the ball far behind the defender, bounces it,

  • pushes it over the hand of the goalie,

  • and scores for the other team.

  • What a nasty own goal.

  • The game would have been a victory for the team in white,

  • but nature tied things up determined to blow off a team's momentum,

  • win, lose, or draw.

  • It socc- hurts to watch! I'm Carl Azuz for CNN Student News.

  • We are back tomorrow, but then we'll be off the air for the Thanksgiving holiday

  • for the rest of the week.

Great to see you this Monday November, 23rd.

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November 23, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle

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