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  • This is CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • We`re bringing you current events from around the world with no commercials.

  • My name is Carl Azuz. It`s great to see you this Tuesday, August 18th.

  • If you follow the news over the summer,

  • you probably heard something about the Iran nuclear deal.

  • It`s an agreement reached by Iran

  • and six other countries led by the U.S.

  • and it concerns Iran`s controversial nuclear program.

  • For years, Iran has insisted the program

  • was for peaceful purposes like nuclear power.

  • Other countries, including the U.S.,

  • were concerned it was being used to make nuclear weapons.

  • The international deal announced on July 14

  • is called the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.

  • It gets rid of many international sanctions,

  • these economic penalties on Iran.

  • That could mean tens of billions of dollars will start flowing into Iran`s economy.

  • In exchange, Iran is required to significantly limit

  • its nuclear program in the years to come

  • and to allow international inspectors to investigate its facilities

  • to make sure Iran lives up to that end of the deal.

  • President Obama calls the agreement a good one,

  • saying Iran`s access to a nuclear bomb would speed up

  • without the deal and that there will be another war

  • in the Middle East without the deal.

  • Iranian President Hassan Rouhani also called it a good agreement,

  • saying the prayers of his nation have come true.

  • But Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says

  • the deal itself would bring war

  • and cause a nuclear arms race in the Middle East.

  • He strongly opposes the deal with Iran,

  • which has repeatedly threatened Israel in the past.

  • And U.S. critics say President Obama`s original goal

  • was that Iran would end its nuclear program altogether,

  • that this deal falls short of that.

  • The U.S. Congress gets to weigh in on this.

  • After a 60-day review period, lawmakers could vote to nullify,

  • basically cancelled out the U.S. part of the agreement.

  • President Obama says he`ll veto any legislation

  • that prevents the Iran deal from going through.

  • Congress could vote to override that veto,

  • we`ll be keeping an eye on this in the weeks ahead.

  • This is the CNN STUDENT NEWS Roll Call.

  • Who is watching from the around the world?

  • Well, we`ve got the Eagles today, the ones from Military Magnet Academy.

  • It`s in Charleston, South Carolina.

  • Flying over the Pacific, on the Hawaiian island of Molokai,

  • we heard from the Farmers.

  • They`re watching at Molokai High School in Ho`olehua.

  • I hope I got that right.

  • And in Southeast Asia,

  • hello to the International School of Ho Chi Minh City.

  • Thank you for making us part of your day in Vietnam.

  • There`s a major debate going on in Japan right now

  • about the future role of its military.

  • Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe

  • wants his nation`s troops to be able to fight in conflicts outside of Japan.

  • Their ability to do that would be limited,

  • but this would also be a significant change in the way

  • Japan`s military has operated since the end of World War II.

  • Japan`s pacifist constitution came about

  • after a very dark period in Japanese history.

  • You think about the country that you see today.

  • Imagine that 70 years ago here in Japan,

  • Tokyo and many other major cities were flattened.

  • They were in ruins.

  • Two atomic bombs have been dropped on the country,

  • several million had died.

  • And both the Japanese and the Americans

  • wanted to find a way to insure this kind of catastrophe

  • would never happen again.

  • And that is how Article 9 of the Japanese constitution came about.

  • The Americans helped write it and essentially

  • what it does is expressly forbid Japan

  • from using the military as a means to settle international disputes.

  • In a separate treaty,

  • the United States agreed to defend Japan from its enemies

  • and that has been the status quo for the last seven decades.

  • But now, some here are saying that it`s time to change.

  • Japan technically doesn`t have a military.

  • It has a self defense force that for decades

  • has been very limited in what it`s allowed to do.

  • Essentially, it can only defend the Japanese mainland.

  • Under these reinterpretations of the Japanese constitution,

  • the self defense force may be able to have a more expanded militarily.

  • A lot of people are upset about this

  • and we`re seeing it right here on the streets of Tokyo.

  • Some of the largest protests in several years,

  • people saying they don`t want to see Japan go to war.

  • They don`t want to see Japanese troops coming home

  • in body bags and they certainly don`t want a repeat

  • of those dark days of World War II.

  • China, South Korea, they`re also worried.

  • They remember just 70 years ago when Japan was an aggressor,

  • an occupier, a killer.

  • They`re very leery about the enhanced role of the Japanese military.

  • But if you look at it from Shinzo Abe and his party`s perspective,

  • from the United States` perspective, they`re saying, hey,

  • the world is a different place today.

  • There`s a greater threat of terrorism

  • and the United States and other allies are saying

  • that they need Japan`s help,

  • they need Japan to contribute to

  • keeping the Asia Pacific region stable and safe.

  • Huge historic changes that are happening right now

  • that have global ramifications.

  • Abuse of the drug heroin has skyrocketed in the U.S.

  • Since 2002, the number of people

  • who died from heroin overdoses has quadrupled.

  • Yesterday, the White House announced a new program

  • that targets heroin abuse in 15 states,

  • where it`s gone up recently.

  • The plan would team up public healthy officials with police

  • and instead of punishing users of the illegal drug with the arrest or jail time,

  • the plan would focus on treating them,

  • and finding out who`s distributing the drugs.

  • Critics say the $2.5 million that the Obama administration

  • is committing to this program isn`t nearly enough

  • and that this won`t do much to address heroin addiction in the long term.

  • Heroin is an incredibly addictive opiate.

  • How do these chemicals affect the brain?

  • One big way is by exerting powerful pain relief to the rest of the body.

  • Chemicals flood the system and latch on to millions

  • of opiate receptors peppered throughout the body.

  • Think of opiates in the receptors like puzzle pieces.

  • When they bind together, pain signals are dulled or they go away altogether.

  • If the brain already has opiate receptors,

  • does that mean it can naturally provide pain relief?

  • That`s right.

  • Feel good chemicals like endorphinsare natural opiates

  • that dull pain and also give you a rush.

  • The problem with manmade opiates that mimic endorphins,

  • take too many and they can overwhelm the system,

  • give you too much of a rush, that can lead to dependence or abuse.

  • Addiction becomes an even bigger problem,

  • because opiates also slow down breathing and heart rate.

  • Mix them with other things that slow down your body

  • and everything could grind to a halt.

  • In fact, every 19 minutes,

  • someone dies of an accidental prescription drug overdose,

  • most of the time involves an opiate.

  • It`s now more common than dying in a car crash.

  • If you want to avoid that fate, don`t take more that you`re prescribed.

  • Don`t use other people`s prescriptions.

  • Never mix opiates with alcohol

  • and maybe try other ways of alleviating your pain,

  • like over the counter pain relievers and good old fashioned exercise.

  • Well, heroin overdoses aren`t the only grim statistic

  • that`s up in the U.S. Traffic deaths are 14 percent higher this year

  • than at this time last year.

  • That`s according to the National Safety Council.

  • It says 2015 is on pace to be the deadliest year for drivers since 2007.

  • Why? The council says as the U.S. economy improves,

  • more people have jobs and are driving to them.

  • Gas prices are also likely factor.

  • They`re 30 percent lower on average than last year,

  • which makes it cheaper to drive.

  • Of course, all that affects traffic, too.

  • The time you spent stuck in traffic each year

  • depends a lot on your daily commute.

  • According to the U.S. Census, the average spends 50 minutes

  • commuting to and from work everyday.

  • Traffic makes it worse.

  • Drivers in the 10 worst congested U.S. cities

  • waste about 47 hours in traffic each year.

  • That`s more than a week`s vacation time.

  • So, what`s the solution?

  • Experts say building our way out of congestion won`t work.

  • In fact, studies show building bigger roads actually makes traffic worse.

  • New road just create new drivers.

  • Public transportation can help

  • but some urban engineers say it won`t fix the problem.

  • Another potential solution is to charge people to drive on congested routes.

  • Experts believe people will continue to drive as long as it`s easy and cheap.

  • Increasing the cost could reduce the number of cars in the road.

  • Whatever the solution, let`s hope it comes soon.

  • According to NREX (ph), traffic costs American families about $1,700 each year.

  • That cost is expected to rise to $2,300 in just 15 years.

  • The Gateway Arch stands 630 feet tall over St. Louis, Missouri.

  • It weighs more than 1,700 tons. It`s made of steel and concrete.

  • What`s it like to clean it?

  • Well, first, you got to climb up, step by step.

  • It probably helps if you`re not too scared of heights.

  • The arch can sway a bit in the winds,

  • so you want to be prepared for that, too.

  • Other than that, well,

  • it`s probably like cleaning any monument to Westward Expansion.

  • But you might not want to get roped in to a job like that.

  • Finding the right spots to clean can be a game of hide and seek.

  • But it`s important that someone steps up to this monumental task,

  • because after all corrosion is its arch enemy.

  • That cleans up today`s edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • I`m Carl Azuz. We hope to see you right back here tomorrow.

This is CNN STUDENT NEWS.

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2015年8月18日--中新網學生新聞,有字幕。 (August 18, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle)

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