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  • Whether you are watching this first thing in the morning or it`s ten minutes before the bell rings at the end of the day,

  • Fridays are awesome. I`m Carl Azuz with CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • There are just over 316 million people in the U.S. and two thirds of them are feeling a blast of unseasonably cold weather.

  • Now, cold is relative. Today`s high here in Atlanta, Georgia is 46, but it`s normally 64 this time of year.

  • The other day Casper, Wyoming`s high was two, as in two degrees.

  • It`s normally 45 right now. Denver, Colorado, Lovett, Texas, Livingston, Montana, they`ve all set records this week involving cold temperatures for mid-November.

  • It`s not that it never gets cold in these places or other American cities. It`s that it never does it so early in the season. So why?

  • Blame the bomb cyclone. Yep, that`s right. Bomb cyclone is actually a real weather term.

  • Frigid weather and snow are already in the U.S. So, how did it happen?

  • Blame it on the leftovers from Super-typhoon Nuri. It built up to Alaska mixing warm tropical air with the polar vortex.

  • And changing the direction of the Jetstream allowing cold air just going to the U.S.

  • Normally, between the polar vortex stays where it`s supposed to be - in the North Pole, trapping frigid air up where it belongs.

  • But the bomb cyclone shook things up and sent all that Arctic air south.

  • Bottom line, winter came early and it might be here to stay.

  • Quite a different natural event to catch you up on in the 50th U.S. state. We`ve been reporting on a slow moving disaster, a creeping lava flow from Hawaii`s Kilauea Volcano.

  • Since late June, the 2,000 degree lava has been bubbling its way toward a Hawaiian town named Pahoa.

  • It overtook and burned down a home there early this week. It happened in 45 minutes. NO one was hurt, the family get evacuated in September.

  • There`s hope for other parts of the community: for several days now, there`s been a pause in the lava`s advance.

  • The eruption hasn`t stopped, but the main lava flow isn`t moving towards structures at this time.

  • Scientists with European Space Agency say their Rosetta mission is trying to answer very big questions about the solar system`s history.

  • But a simpler question they are working on involves their comet lander.

  • Where exactly is it? The $1.4 billion mission made history this week by placing the spacecraft on the comet 67-P, but not everything is going according to plan.

  • Absolutely stunning images that we`re seeing from the surface of the comet 67-P, which is, of course, some 310 million miles away from Earth.

  • Now, the interesting thing about these images is that they are stunning to the scientists themselves.

  • They believed that on the comet surface they would find a very powdery substance,

  • they believed the surface itself might be very soft, and that the lander, if bad comes to worse, might sink in and wouldn`t be able to transmit any signals back to Earth.

  • However, what we are seeing on these images seems to be a very rocky surface,

  • but it`s unclear whether or not those are really rocks or whether those might be ice crystals mixed with some sort of metallic dust.

  • Again, these are all things that the Philae lander is supposed to find out in the coming days.

  • One of the interesting things that they just told us is that the landing seems to have been a rodeo ride, by any stretch of the imagination.

  • What happened was, Philae lander came and touched down pretty much in exactly the spot where they wanted it to touch down, but then a harpoon system didn`t deploy.

  • It jumped back up. That jump took two hours, because, of course, there is very little gravity here.

  • Then, it came back down very close to some sort of crater, jumped again for another seven minutes, and then came to a standstill.

  • And they think that right now it`s on the edge of a cliff.

  • It`s probably standing with two feet on the ground, the third foot, they believe, is up in the air.

  • They are not exactly sure where it is right now.

  • They know it`s on the comet, because that`s what the sensors are telling them.

  • And, they say, that pretty much all of the scientific instruments are working, the one thing they think might be a problem is drilling,

  • because the harpoon system failed and therefore the comet is not attached to the lander or the lander attached to the attached to the comet,

  • and they are afraid if they try something like that, that it might actually fall off the comet.

  • There is one problem that they have with the mission right now, and that is the place where they act right now, close to that cliff,

  • seems to be pretty far away from any sort of sunlight, so they are getting a lot less sunlight than they actually thought,

  • and that`s a problem because right now it`s running on battery power, but it will need power on the solar panel.

  • It`s going to need light rays if it wants to recharge those batteries and continue their scientific experiments for a long time to come.

  • So, that is something that they are working on, they say could impact the mission, but at this point in time, of course, people here in this town of Darmstadt, Germany,

  • absolutely jubilant at what they`ve achieved and that is to catch a comet in the middle of space.

  • Getting thousands of Roll Call request in our transcript page at cnnstudentnews.com.

  • Thanks for your continued request and your patience.

  • We are kicking things off at Washington Middle School.

  • It`s in Albuquerque, New Mexico, it`s the home of the Radars.

  • Paddling upstream to Beaver Creek High School, it`s in Beaver Creek, Ohio, with the Beavers watching CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • And in the pine tree state, the city of Old Town, Maine, we`ve got the Coyotes or the Coyotes of Old Town High School.

  • Hello to all of you.

  • An investigator for the United Nations says North Korea`s leader may be responsible for massive human rights abuses.

  • A U.N. report published in February accused the Asian country`s government of torturing, murdering and starving people.

  • t didn`t directly named Kim Jong-un. But a U.N. investigator now says there is enough evidence to hold the dictator responsible.

  • North Korea says the investigation is part of a U.S. plot to destroy its political system.

  • We know that system is communist, we know that government controls the media, we know that Kim Jong-un leads that government.

  • But there is a lot we don`t know about Kim himself.

  • North Korea is famous for creating cults of personality around the leaders of the country, and Kim Jong-un is no exception.

  • He was the youngest son of the previous leader of North Korea, Kim Jong-il, and his favorite wife Ko Yong-hui.

  • Now, as a child, he was sent to a prestigious boarding school in Switzerland where he registered under an assumed name and claimed to be the son of a Korean diplomat.

  • He then attends at the Korean Military Academy and was quickly promoted up the military`s ranks.

  • When in days of his father`s death in 2011, Kim Jong-un was transitioned into power with support from the country`s ruling elite.

  • Now, despite North Korea`s pariah status on the international stage, Kim Jong-un is creating an almost God-like image for himself in home,

  • similar to that of his grandfather, Kim Il-sung.

  • Wherever he goes, he`s met with fanatical devotion.

  • Mend wade waist deep just to get a look at him, women are crying at his feet.

  • It`s really hard to know how much of this devotion is real, but the North Korean regime is doing a pretty good job of keeping the cult of Kim alive.

  • Now, just like his father before him, Kim has drawn the ire of the international community for his nuclear antics and his human rights abuses.

  • Since he took power, prison camps in North Korea have expanded, and there`s been a serious crackdown on would be defectors.

  • Kim shocked the world when he had his own uncle executed. And since then he`s been purging party officials who have any connection to the uncle.

  • Trying to flack some of that criticism, Kim has been trying to show his softer side.

  • He`s been photographed touring children`s hospitals and orphanages, and he`s ordered construction of amusement parks and ski resorts in the country.

  • But despite the cults of personality that Kim has created, North Korea is steel seen as one of the most opaque countries in the world.

  • North Korea watchers say that jovial face we see (INAUDIBLE) the dark reality for the North Korean people.

  • Two things that may not seem like they go together. Surfing and Alaska.

  • Yes, you need a wetsuit, and the wave not far from Anchorage can tumble for 50 miles.

  • It`s a board-tide, when seawater surges in from a broad bay to a narrowing inland.

  • The young lady you see surfing that turned again arm board tides (ph) says she`ll go for as long as she can stand and not get distracted by the beautiful scenery.

  • Sometimes she`ll even take a rest, even while she`s riding a wave.

  • Of course, a board tide, or a tidal board could become a tidal bore if you detide your board in a pour of the ride of the tide any bore.

  • If not, the tide ride is good tidings for good ridings, with time in tide, tied for a ride, delighting riders biding (ph) time -(INAUDIBLE).

  • Tide. I`m Carl Azuz for CNN STUDENT NEWS.

Whether you are watching this first thing in the morning or it`s ten minutes before the bell rings at the end of the day,

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November 14, 2014 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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