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  • Thanks for spending ten minutes of your Wednesday with CNN STUDENT NEWS. I`m Carl Azuz at the CNN Center.

  • There are more than 1,000 U.S. troops in West Africa helping prevent the spread of Ebola.

  • Thousands more are set to deploy. For some in the Army, there`s a mandatory 21 day quarantine when they return to their base in Italy.

  • But for civilians who`ve traveled to the U.S. from Ebola-stricken areas, that`s up for debate.

  • The U.S. government has revised its guidelines a couple of times now.

  • Some criticize it for overreacting to the Ebola threat. Some call CDC`s guidelines too confusing.

  • Some criticize it for overreacting to the Ebola threat. Some call CDC`s guidelines too confusing.

  • Some criticize it for not doing enough to protect Americans.

  • But here`s the thing: the CDC doesn`t have the authority to enforce its guidelines.

  • States do, and a few have added their own regarding who gets quarantined and when.

  • It`s not illegal, the Constitution allows states to impose stricter health regulations than the federal government.

  • But they can`t be challenged.

  • San Francisco`s China Town was given a year-long quarantine order after a suspected case of the bubonic plague in the early 1900s.

  • This black and white video shows men, most likely the Health Department committee checking for disease.

  • And then there`s Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In the late 1800s, this startling historic illustration shows how a small pox outbreak forces people into isolation hospitals.

  • Perhaps, America`s most famous quarantine happened right behind me:

  • on Ellis Island, 12 million people were processed, more than 2 million would be hospitalized or quarantined.

  • CNN`s review of quarantine and isolation`s statutes across the country reveals that all 50 states have the power to isolate and quarantine.

  • At least give states, specifically detail their power to treat the sick involuntarily, at least four states mean business.

  • Violating the order is a felony. Wisconsin could have the stiffest fine, $10,000. Mississippi, the longest jail sentence, five years.

  • The Centers for Disease Control is not recommending mandatory quarantines for everyone traveling from West Africa.

  • Deeply concerned about the Ebola situation.

  • But a pen stroke could change that, if President Obama exercises his executive power allowing federal authorities to detain and medically examine people traveling between states or entering the country.

  • What prevents the government from overstepping its powers?

  • Whenever a citizen is incarcerated or confined, you can go into court and say to a judge, I`ve been locked up without good cause, and I want a hearing on the issue.

  • So, are fears about Ebola well founded? Also, what for debate: The World Health Organization says there`ve been more than 10,000 suspected cases of Ebola in this year`s outbreak.

  • It`s the worst in recorded history.

  • The CDC says on average, 36,000 people in the U.S. die from the flu every year.

  • Still, one difference is, that people are far more likely to survive the flu.

  • It has now spurred debates about whether you`ll be infected while flying or make doctors don hazmat suits or cause local governments to impose quarantines,

  • but between five and 20 percent of the U.S. population between now and February will likely come down with the flu.

  • Though most people will suffer only fever, aches or chills, but the very young, the very old or those who are already sick, the flu can be fatal.

  • The defenses are weakened by the flu virus and a bacteria can come in and set up sharp in the longs, so when that happens, you know, your lungs are compromised.

  • You might have very bad craft, you might even become unable to breathe without assistance.

  • Unlike Ebola, which is hard to get, the flu is easily transmitted by casual contact.

  • On public transit and restaurants, at any public event. And flu pandemics have ravaged the world.

  • In 1918, the Spanish flu killed an estimated 30 to 50 million people, perhaps many millions more.

  • Still, less than half of the U.S. population receives a flu shot, so the CDC says in any given year, 200,000 people will get a severe case of the flu, so severe they`ll wind up in the hospital.

  • So we got this segment called Roll Call. It`s a chance to have your school announced on CNN Student News

  • There is now only one way to submit a request, and you need to be at least 13 years old.

  • Go to cnnstudentnews.com, click where it says roll call, and leave a comment at the bottom of our transcript page.

  • We`ll pick three schools from each day`s transcript. You can make one request every day, but spamming will not help you.

  • Please tell us your school name, city, state, and mascot. Good luck.

  • Time for the shoutout. What is the southernmost U.S. state? If you think you know it, shout it out.

  • Is it Louisiana, Hawaii, Texas or Florida? You`ve got 3 seconds, go.

  • At around 21 degrees north latitude, Honolulu, Hawaii is farther south than Key West, Florida.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your shoutout.

  • Hawaii`s big island is even farther south than the capital in Honolulu, and its Mount Kilauea, one of the most active volcanic masses on earth, is threatening to destroy a village named Pahoa.

  • Hawaii`s big island is even farther south than the capital in Honolulu, and its Mount Kilauea, one of the most active volcanic masses on earth, is threatening to destroy a village named Pahoa.

  • It`s a natural disaster in slow motion. A lava flow with heat so high, it melts rock.

  • It was just feet away from homes when we produced this show.

  • Humans haven`t had great success in stopping lava flows. The thing that`s most effective, when the volcano stops erupting.

  • Right over here, that road block, that`s the way the lava is headed, and this is the main road of town.

  • Lava on Main Street. In Pahoa on the big island, a 2,000-degree river of molten rock is just a few hundred feet away from the town.

  • And there is no way to stop it.

  • Residents are on a moment`s notice to evacuate as the super heated stone threatens the town of 950.

  • Everybody, including myself, is quite nervous. We can`t see the future. The flow does what the flow does.

  • Hawaii`s famous Kilauea volcano has continuously erupted since 1983. Usually the spectacular lava flows pour south, eventually reaching the sea.

  • But in June, a new flow started heading the opposite way to the northeast.

  • A dark oozing mass, consuming everything in its path. And experts say the lava has picked up speed as it heads directly for Pahoa.

  • Hawaii`s governor, signing a request asking for a presidential disaster declaration and for federal aid.

  • As it gets closer, the key is communication with the community, keeping people informed, and everybody continue to work around the clock.

  • Officials going door to door warning residents as the flow inches dangerously close.

  • Already, some roads have been forced to close as the lava overtakes them.

  • With many residents fearing they`ll be cut off, Hawaii County is rebuilding alternate gravel roads around the expected path of the lava.

  • People downwind from the smoke have been advised to stay indoors.

  • I have asthma myself, and the smoke conditions, if they increase, are going to be hard on some people.

  • It actually has been raining on and off here, but the experts say that has absolutely no impact on the relentlessness of the lava.

  • So the only hope this town has is that it either suddenly stops or turns direction.

  • Otherwise, the same force of nature that created the Hawaiian islands could very well destroy this town.

  • We`ve got some folks watching today from the Northern Mariana Islands.

  • Just northeast of Guam in the western Pacific Ocean, big shoutout to Tanapog (ph) middle school, our viewers in Saipan.

  • In the northern U.S., it`s the Mount Rushmore state up next.

  • The Tigers of Harrisburg High School in Harrisburg, South Dakota are on the roll.

  • And in the Peach State, in Kathleen, Georgia, hello to the Gators of Mossy Creek Middle School.

  • A British technology company has introduced an idea for a passenger plane without windows.

  • Now, before you ask, where is the fun in that, have a look. It`s as if the whole thing is a window.

  • Don`t worry, this is not a plane made of glass.

  • Cameras capture live video of the scene outside and then stream it on the displays on the plane`s walls.

  • The company says without actual windows, planes can be lighter, use less fuel, and have more room inside.

  • Plus, view. It`s as if every traveler can have his head in the clouds without actually having his head in the clouds.

  • Unless you (inaudible), it looks plain awesome, really fly.

  • Video technology for the wing. From out of thin air, it really seems to fuselage of good ideas together.

  • I`m Carl Azuz for CNN Student News and I`m taking off.

Thanks for spending ten minutes of your Wednesday with CNN STUDENT NEWS. I`m Carl Azuz at the CNN Center.

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October 29, 2014 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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